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We have a few Nigerian weithers for pets and I trim hooves every spring and fall. We got them 1 year old and they were not trained to allow trimming so it is a fight every time. Any advice. We do not have milking stations or anything since they are only pets. I normally end up sitting on ground and rolling them upside down in my lap to do it but they fight. They will not allow to do it while they are standing.
 

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Goat Mentor
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Well, if they are small enough, have someone pick them up.

If not, maybe get a stanchion, or train them to tie with collars.

I also saw someone who recently created a hoof trimming sling!!

You may be needing to trim hooves more often than every spring and fall, do make sure they aren’t getting too overgrown!! Some have to trim monthly to keep up.
 

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Kinder Goat Breeder
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I do not have a station or milking stand. I use goat halters from Jeffers and then tie them somewhere near a wall so they cant get away. It's a fight sometimes, but as long as you don't let them think they can get away and win they get the hang of it eventually. My does lay down while I do it which is kind of annoying, but I can still get the job done. One of my bucks basically puts all his weight on the foot I have lifted so I have found a way to have one knee under him supporting his body and this way I don't have all that weight to hold up. Oi. It's not fun. I am sure a stand would be easier, but I make it work.
 

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If the hooves are softer, it makes for easier trimming. Walk them a bit through wet grass or (if possible) soak in warm water a little while). Wet grass works the easiest.

An inexpensive stand really is a time saver and a back saver. I see a lot on Craigslist, etc. and they are really not too hard to make.
 

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I usually tie mine with the 1 foot short dog leashes to my fence. I did have a friend make a milking stand - never to be used for milking! - that I'm slowly training them to get used to so I can do feet on there.

One bright spot was a new pair of trimmers I bought after doing some research on here. I had the blue handled TSC ones and they just couldn't seem to cut very good. I bought new multi-purpose shears from Amazon and man, they are like a hot knife through butter. I have to be careful I don't cut myself or too much of the hoof, but at least I don't have to struggle cutting through the hoof and the girls don't get stressed more during the procedure taking longer.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001VB1IPI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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A rope halter, and since they are minis, a few wood pallets with solid top, or some other platform to get them off the ground a bit stacked up against a good strong fence. Halter Tie them SNUG to the fence, no slack, with head elevated. If the head is down low, they have more power to struggle. Then put your shoulder against their ribs so they are along the fence and trim, pivot them around to put other side of the body against the fence to do the other side.

Alternatively, tie them tight, straddle backwards, and bring rear foot turned towards butt, but with them being very short, you would probably be way too bent over to be comfortable.
 

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I just want to point out that I trim my two wethers’ hooves during their “sleepy time” and it may take a day to do each hoof but it’s worth not having all the stress, for me and the goats!!
 

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Fair-Haven
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I would start working with them to tie - not for hoof trimming but daily if you can. A few minutes to start, treat at the end. They won't be so stressed when it comes time for the trim.
 

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trimming stress-free needs to be the end goal of a long process! the slow way of training is usually more beneficial for you and the goats in the end.

IE i start tie-training my kids at about three-four months old when feeding (on a 10 inch lead) and when they become comfortable with that, i begin desensitizing them to having their legs touched and feet picked up. when it becomes time to trim, they at least know kinda what to expect. this can be done with adult goats too.

i have a general rule that once the goat is safely restrained, i will not let go of the foot (***not twisting the leg in a painful or unnatural way) until i am ready, and IF they are calm, so the reward for them holding still and not struggling is having their foot back. as long as the goat isn't panicked, it is intelligent enough to learn how to cooperate.

good luck!!
 
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