Hoof Trimming Phobia

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by TexasRanger, Feb 26, 2010.

  1. TexasRanger

    TexasRanger New Member

    589
    Feb 2, 2010
    San Antonio, TX
    Anyone live near Canyon Lake, TX want to teach me how to trim a goats hooves? :oops: I can trim a horse's, but I know nothing about goat's hooves. I'm always worried I will somehow manage to hurt her. So, any takers? It also doesn't help that when I pick up her foot, she immediately collapses and tries to tuck it under her :roll: , this goes with any hoof. I haven't found a vet who really knows anything about goats yet. Help! :tears:
     
  2. cdtrum

    cdtrum New Member

    Aug 25, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    I was in your shoes about a 2 years ago......Stacey has a how too on her site , End Of the Line Farm and you can do some web searches of how to's, I know that Fiasco Farm has a how to on her site. I just kept reading over and over and looking at the diagrams on the web, also there are some videos on some sites.....what works for me is, I have my husband hold my guys while I trim (my guys are all minis). Yes, they do try and pull their leg up under them, but once they realize your not giving up then they relax and give in to it, at least mine do.....my guys have also learned that treats come afterwards!

    Just take it slow and easy, start out just trimming a little off, every time you trim you will get better at it.
     

  3. DebMc

    DebMc Member

    845
    Dec 10, 2009
    What about a farrier? I lucked out and found one that not only has experience w/goats, but he also uses only positive methods of handling. Afterwards, my girls mobbed him for more treats. :ROFL: The farrier was flabbergasted. He said that was the first time he's ever had goats come back for more and he attributed the difference in their behavior to mine's training (I use only positive training methods). Mind you, a few months earlier two of those does were running wild on the range up on the reservation and were fearful of people. Yes, their hooves were overgrown but not that bad, really.

    Anywho, in preparation, you may want to start conditioning your goats to having their hooves picked up and handled and train them to stand on cue (for treats) - if you haven't already. Good luck!

    Deb Mc
     
  4. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    Looking at the above mentioned websites helped me tremendously, when I started out.

    Do you have a milk stand to work on? It helps some if they are eating while trimming. My stand is big enough for me and the goat so if a new one wants to collapse I sorta prop her up with my body while I trim. And of course, they are always loved on and given treats after wards too. Eventually they learn to love getting on the stand for just about anything.

    We are quite a distance from each other but if you ever get over towards Giddings give me a holler I can show you on some of mine.