Hoop shelters with wood walls

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by 21goaties, Sep 19, 2020.

  1. 21goaties

    21goaties Well-Known Member

    Mar 13, 2018
    Southern GA
    If anyone has ANY photos of shelters similar to these (photos are not mine):

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    I would love to see them! I'm trying to figure out how to build hoop shelters where the cattle panels don't sink into the ground over time, but the shelter is still pretty sturdy.
     
    Iluvlilly! likes this.
  2. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    We have had one for 5 years! We just recently tore it out as we desperately needed to add a new barn, so after looking at options we are installing a carport and turning it into a barn. BUT, we'll keep the cattle panel shelter as an extra shelter especially in the winter so they can be moved around and not in the barn all the time.

    Old picture, excuse the glare it was through my kitchen window lol. This was 11' wide x 19' long. Cattle panels are attached on the inside of pallets, and OSB and plywood used on the outside, then we made a doorway on one side in the back, and then the door in the middle on the front that we could open/close depending on the weather. It was usually about 10 degrees warmer in there in the winter, but very hot in the summer even with the door open - but also in direct daytime sun.
    We used billboard canvas for the top, and I highly recommend if you want long usage, and have a mix of weather that you use a heavy tarp, canvas or find used billboard signs you can repurpose.
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    Biggest issue is we didn't paint the wood, so the weather really deteriorated the sides.

    We put a V hay feeder in the middle, and my husband used posts from dead trees he'd cut up and that also helped support the middle of the the top especially in case we got snow.
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    The front faced south, back faced north, and the only issue we had was rain somehow would blow into the back by the doorway so it always stayed moist back there which absolutely drove me crazy. No sun hit that spot. So get a good idea of where you will have your doors and make sure you get sunlight and make sure your weather won't blow right into it that away it can dry out and not have weather blown into it. Our weather tends to come from the west, sometimes from the south, but we seldom had issues with it blowing into the shelter which was great.

    If you look at this video you can see how we temporarily set it up so the girls still have shelter until their new barn is done. We do have the small barn, but it's not big enough for everyone come kidding season and we have a couple of does that stay in there at night since one has a baby (so she has a creep feeder at night)
    This shelter can comfortably house 6 Boer does. You can see that old canvas billboard sign again 5 years old is still very useful! We do have a few holes in it, but have a piece of old billboard sign under it to help stop any leaks which were super minor.

     

  3. Sfgwife

    Sfgwife Well-Known Member

    Feb 17, 2018
    North Cakalaki
    That is how we do shelter for our pigs in winter. Minus the wood walls. They really dont sink in the ground.
     
    MadHouse and Moers kiko boars like this.
  4. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    Here's the one I made, I've since closed in where the wire front is with plywood. It's on skids so I can move it to different areas for rotating pastures. It's now 3 years old and I just change the skin each spring.easy!
    I used this YouTube video as a guide to make it then added solid walls.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  6. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    I will state that if you do a hoop shelter, I would definitely use the wood on the sides so your goats are not tearing up the cover. Our girls are thankfully leaving it alone, but if we had mischievous goats or kids they would climb on or chew on it not doubt. That is whey we did the wood on the sides of ours. That thing has been solid, sustained 70mph winds a couple of summers ago without an issue, whereas our whole county was devastated with tree damage and power/phone lines taken out = looked like a tornado hit our county but they said straight line winds.
     
  7. 21goaties

    21goaties Well-Known Member

    Mar 13, 2018
    Southern GA
    Ours do! Part of it is that dirt builds up around it over time. Basically what ends up happening is that when I'm trying to replace the tarp I have to dig like 1 or 2 panel squares down to find the bottom of the panel and attach the tarp to it.
     
    Sfgwife likes this.
  8. 21goaties

    21goaties Well-Known Member

    Mar 13, 2018
    Southern GA
    Yeah. We put a single electric wire around ours so they won't climb them. We don't have kids though (our goats are pets)
     
  9. 21goaties

    21goaties Well-Known Member

    Mar 13, 2018
    Southern GA
    Do you have to anchor it to the ground or anything?
     
    MadHouse likes this.
  10. 21goaties

    21goaties Well-Known Member

    Mar 13, 2018
    Southern GA
    MadHouse likes this.
  11. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    I have 4 t-posts on the inside corner of each skid. It even held up when we were hit by a EF-1 tornado, it just got moved around ... I just hooked it up and dragged it back in the fenceline and put in new t posts.

    The skin I use I get in Home Depot paint department it's thick 6mm plastic tarp that comes on a roll. I bought one 100 foot box/roll and am still using it so it's worked out as pretty inexpensive housing. If a hole gets poked in the skin I just take a piece of gorilla tape to it and that's that. It's worked great for my herd.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020
  12. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    That's similar to how we did ours except we used the pallets then the OSB/Plywood, we just never made it 'pretty.'
    I do think the pallets helped anchor it down on the sides, so if you get any wind/storms I would highly suggest making sure it's anchored down well and seriously can not beat good canvas/billboard cover, it's heavy, and very durable, and if you check around you can usually get a used billboard fairly cheap.
     
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