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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I got my buck "Ace " he was already a yr old with horns. He is almost 2 now. I'm too scared to band them after seeing horrible gone wrong pictures. So just wondering if its possible to get a vet to remove them and how they would do it?

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Normally they put them under, saw the horns off, then scoop the horn out. His sinus cavity would be open and have to be covered for a long time though. But no, he shouldn't get any scurs afterward. It is not a cheap procedure though.
 

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We doe ours ourself. I take a pair of gougers and snip off most of the horn. I take my red hot calf dehorner and seal the end of the horn (WILL bleed). Then now that I can get to the base of the horn I take the gougers and grab off the horn. I then proceed to cauterize and dehorn as I regularly would a kid to ensure no scur regrowth. Works great. I'll have to grab a pic of Baby "after". It's been 4 months almost since our last run in with horns. I do have a before pic though.
 

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It's gruesome, and you need to be able to remain calm while working quite swiftly and efficiently. Easiest with two people.
 

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So just wondering if its possible to get a vet to remove them and how they would do it?

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Yes, a vet can do it. The vet removed a horn/scur that was headed for the eye of an 18 month old doe of mine. The situation was caused by a botched disbudding. Long story, but suffice it to say that I am not the one who attempted to disbud her. The vet sedated her - did not put her under - and sawed off the horn/scur with a wire-type saw. The vet then dusted her head with antibiotic powder, wrapped it with gauze, and I took her home. I kept a close eye on her for the next few weeks, and everything was fine. It cost me $75.00 for the whole thing. Had there been 2 horns, it would have been $150.00. It was not pretty, Calypso cried, and there was a very real chance the sedation could have killed her. If he were my buck, I would learn to live with the horns.
 

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I agree 100% with "GOATCRAZY"... Due to the pain , and not to mention the chance of death , I would find a way to live with the horns , or id get rid of him and get another that's hornless.. His horns are beautiful! Why do you want to remove them? PLEASE DONT MESS WITH HIS HORNS....Post the reason and issues your having from the horns and we will advise you how to correct it without removing his horns..
 

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There is a thread around here with pictures of a handsome fellow who had his horns removed by the vet, but I am rushing out the door to work and don't have time to find it. The lovely boy with the long bangs, I think his name was Toupee or something like that. It is MAJOR surgery and requires significant after care. I have banded horns on a mature doe, but they weren't as wide at the bottom as that fellow's. They took three months to finally come off. I have banded several sets of horns now with nothing but good results but I would be hesitant to band ones that sturdy. I would try to find some other way to deal with them, personally. In fact that is what I am doing with my meat mix buck now that I have finally excepted that I need to go horn-free he will get to keep his just because they are too big for me to feel comfortable banding and i won't put him through a surgical removal. So he has to live with a piece of pipe duct taped to his head for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
After hearing what you all said I'm just gonna let him keep his horns:) I don't want to take a chance on him dying or being in any pain. I was just curious about it. If I could have had it done by a vet without any pain or risk to him then I would do it . I just didn't know anything about it. Thanks for the info :)
 

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@Jodi


What? That makes no sense.

If you were referring to us getting knocked out while we were doing the procedure, I say easiest with two simply because one can burn, the other can gouge. I sat on the goat and burned, my DH gouges. He's quick, no hesitation, no slips. One quick movement. Make sure the gouges are sharpened and clean.

Must not be around cattle too much. This is very commonplace. With cattle many people skip dehorning through fly season, as we do. The heat, flies, stress, and all the flying pollen really risk the animal's immune system. Fly strike, infection, heat stress, things of that nature. We do mass dehorning around here in mid-fall. Sometimes 75-100 head. Gouging, burning, it's all used. Horns of all sizes from nubs to 3 inches across at the base. We do it all.

Call me cold hearted but this goes on way more than you think and animals handle pain soooo much better than measly humans. Their down time is hours, ours would be weeks.
 

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I know so many people who just simply cut the horns off and none of them has lost any goats. I have done it with cattle, I have one that her horn goes down then into her face and we cut it off and burned. My issue with goats is they SCREAM!!! I have a few does that their horns need to come off, one she loves my kids but is a lamancha cross and her horns go straight up and I dont want one of my human kids eyes poked, but since I am chicken Im going with banding this winter :)
 

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It sounded really painful to me, I meant I hoped the goats were knocked out or given some kind of pain relief
 

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It sounded really painful to me, I meant I hoped the goats were knocked out or given some kind of pain relief
Ah ok I thought you meant like you wanted to knock us out! Lol
 

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Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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I had the horns removed on a pack goat prospect that ended up being sold as a breeder when a friend of ours saw him and more or less demanded him :). Our vet came out and did the surgery. It went flawlessly and the recovery didnt do to bad though an infection set in during the warmer months but all in all pretty good and with very little scur growth afterwords. With that being said, we would never do it again. I have seen and help do cows and that is quick and easy. Its not like that with goats. And the boy we did was only about 2 to 3 months old. So If you are not having problems with him butting or getting his head stuck, then dont even bother.
 

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Will he likely grow scurs back?
He could...depending on how much the vet take out. My goats was disbudded too late and they have deformed horns. I took them to the vet twice to remove the 'horns'. There are still some growth as of now. The vet at the time said unless I am prepared to take almost the whole skull, sawing the horns at the base does not guarantee no more growth.
If you can stand them, it is probably best to leave them. If you can't, sell him.
 
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