The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At what age do wethers grow horns?? I am worried that my baby might be getting them!!! He is about 2 or 2 1/2 months old.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
59,286 Posts
He should already have horns if he is that old. You usually have to disbud within 5 days of birth if you want to disbud. So a 2 month old should have some growth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well the guy I got him from said he won't grow horns. He has really small nubs were they would be. I think he said he was like a mulley head or something like that.

So does that sound right that he won't grow horns??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well with amigo nothing has broken the skin yet and he wasn't disbudded. Like in the pic above I can see horse with him there are just a few lumps were the horns would be under the skin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
Well the guy I got him from said he won't grow horns. He has really small nubs were they would be. I think he said he was like a mulley head or something like that.

So does that sound right that he won't grow horns??
Mulley (or muley) headed is an archaic term for a polled animal. I've heard it used by old farmers around here about goats and cows. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok thanks just wanted to be 100% sure!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
621 Posts
Are there any Nubians that are naturally polled? I don't like disbudding and so far I have gotten skurs twice. If you get a polled buck what is the percentage of kids that will be polled vs. horned with horned does?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
Yes, any goat, given it is in their genetics, can be naturally polled.
And I believe it's a 25% chance of the offspring being polled, might be more, I'm not completely sure on it.
it depends on whether or not the polled parent is homozygous for the polled gene or heterozygous. All of the charts I have read say it is 50% chance on a Pp to pp breeding. Here is a sample of a Punnett square showing how that works (just replace their letters with "P" and "p" and you can see how it works):



Just a small article about it:
http://americangoatsociety.com/education/polled_genetics.php

Chart showing the possible results from heterozygous, homozygous and horned crosses:

http://nigeriandwarfcolors.weebly.com/polledhorned-genetics.html

Had a poled yearling Toggenburg doe kid with triples and all of them were also poled :)
You should play the lottery, haha!!!

My polled buck is from a polled to polled breeding, clearly they were heterozygous because out of triplets he was the only polled kid. And none of the three kids from his dam's sister (polled, bred to the same polled buck) were polled. I got a polled doeling and a horned buckling out of my horned doe crossed to my polled buck. I am hoping to get another polled doe out of her before i retire her (mini nubian who milked a gallon a day prior to old scar tissue causing her to stop producing in half her udder, still getting well over half a gallon from the other side).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,787 Posts
What happens if you breed polled to polled? Some horrible birth defect like lethal white in horses or something?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,285 Posts
The dominant poll trait is closely linked to a trait that conditions recessive hermaphrodite in females.

So in matings between a poll and a horned goat, you will average 50% poll kids and 50% horned kids and no practical chance of hermaphrodites.

In matings between two poll animals both of which are carrying the horned gene, you will average 75% poll and 25% horned progeny. On average you will have half males and half females in each category. Among the females, 25% will appear 'male' and be hermaphrodite polls, 50% will be normal female and polled and 25% will be horned and normal.

Among the males, 25% will be homozygous polled, that is have two copies of the poll gene, 50% will be heterozygous polled (one copy poll and one copy horned gene) and 25% will be horned (two copies of the horned gene).

Of the homozygous poll males, some will be sterile and some fertile. It depends on your line of animals whether they are fertile or not. The fertile ones will produce 100% poll progeny
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top