Housing for goats

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by Itchysmom, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. Itchysmom

    Itchysmom New Member

    Apr 2, 2010
    Washington
    Sooooo... Hubby just told me that he is spending ALL his time on our house and setting it up for next winter. This means that he will not have the time to set up a shelter for my goats! :hair:

    The summer will be no problem as I can just set up something temp for them for shade..but winter is another story! I need HELP!

    Obviously the "barn" will not be built this summer, horses have a tree line and are also used to being out in the open during the winter. But, I need something simple for the goats. I do plan on breeding the doe for babies next spring when snow will still most likely be on the ground. Apparently IF I want the goats to come with me I am the one who will have to make a shelter for them! Until she kids I will only have the doe and her whether to worry about. But when she kids I could have up to 5 goats, two adults and three babies. :GAAH: Take in consideration that I am not a carpenter so I need something simple that I can do, with maybe some help, that will keep them warm and dry when it snows. We can get up to 4 feet of snow at any given time. I will need the roof so that the snow load will slide off. Any suggestions?????
     
  2. fiberchick04

    fiberchick04 New Member

    572
    Mar 8, 2010
    Colorado
    We took our old window wells and put them on a couple of bigger logs that we had. And then put a wood back on it. It is like a little hut type deal. It was very easy to do and you can find them on craigslist for pretty cheap. another thing that we did was we took pallets and a couple sheets of plywood and made a chelter out of that too. They have held up very well in the snow. We live in Black Forest, CO and often get a lot of snow. A-Frames have also worked well for us.

    Hope this helps some
     

  3. mistyblue

    mistyblue Senior Member

    815
    Nov 13, 2008
    Angleton, Texas
  4. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    What part of the state are you in? Those gigantic plastic containers work great but you would need a flatbed to haul one.
    In a pinch you could stack a bunch of straw & throw a piece of plywood on top.
     
  5. Itchysmom

    Itchysmom New Member

    Apr 2, 2010
    Washington
    Thanks!

    I didn't think about straw bales...now that I could do! All I would have to figure out is how many I need and put a roof on!
     
  6. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Hehee! Im no carpenter either!! Put a few cinder blocks on your roof so it dont blow off & you're good to go!
    You can even slant it enough for run off. The roof wont last forever but at least its a roof!
     
  7. Itchysmom

    Itchysmom New Member

    Apr 2, 2010
    Washington
    nancy d: what plastic containers are you refering too? I live in north central WA...outside of Oroville/Tanasket
     
  8. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Those gigantic containers they use I think for fertilizer out in your neck of the woods.
    I believe they are freebees after the contents are gone. They make great goat huts I saw them at my breeders near Soap Lake.
    Calf huts are great too though we havent used those either.
     
  9. Itchysmom

    Itchysmom New Member

    Apr 2, 2010
    Washington
    I am not sure what containers you are tlaking about....could you maybe ask your breeder for a picture of one or where they got thiers? I am trying to keep my expensies down as we still need to buy things for the house, but if they are free, well.....
     
  10. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I cant see how straw bales would be lasting and a good enough structure to house kids in a wintry setting.

    why would you want the snow to slide off the roof? snow will insulate the housing
     
  11. Itchysmom

    Itchysmom New Member

    Apr 2, 2010
    Washington
    I know a guy who bales straw and he bales really tight heavy bales. I think they would last the winter here. If not I can always buy extra and change them out if need be.

    You make a good point on the insulation of the snow on the roof. I was just thinkig that I didn't want to have to sweep snow off the roof.
     
  12. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Extra large dogloo's work well... just layer with straw bedding in the winter and they keep cool in the summer. Check craigslist.... people sell used ones for cheap.... just make sure it comes with the bottom.
     
  13. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Good point about snow being an insulator Stacey I didnt think of that!
     
  14. Itchysmom

    Itchysmom New Member

    Apr 2, 2010
    Washington
    I did think about those dog igloos. Are they big enough for a goat to kid in? Again remember mine are Saanens.
     
  15. jay13

    jay13 New Member

    417
    Apr 12, 2009
    Central NC
    Only problem I can see with a plywood roof with snow sitting on it would be how heavy it may get. Snow gets heavy! perhaps if you put a couple of wood poles or something across the top to support it. Would also help give you something to anchor the plywood to. You might also consider tucking some plastic or a tarp around the top few bales to help keep the roof leak free and keep the snow/rain/melt from degrading the plywood too fast. They actually build houses out of straw bales and then stucco them in AZ/NM. Using straw bales would also give you the ability to "TRY" different arrangements and see what works for you. Good Luck!
     
  16. OhCee

    OhCee Yak Lady

    609
    Feb 26, 2010
    Western MT
    There are construction-grade straw bales that are used in building straw houses (yes, I'm serious)... We are thinking of making a straw addition :) You don't just leave it straw, you have to cover it with slip/mud... but it's very insulated. Rebar, straw, do it like bricks and rebar through each half of a bale...
     
  17. jay13

    jay13 New Member

    417
    Apr 12, 2009
    Central NC
    Yes, that is how they were building the straw house I saw in NM. Heck if you do that you can tell hubby you got it done! it would then be basically a permanent structure!
     
  18. Realfoodmama

    Realfoodmama New Member

    425
    Apr 12, 2010
    Santa Fe, NM
    Just a tip about straw construction:

    Here in the NM desert, moisture isn't much of an issue. But if moisture gets into the walls of a straw bale construction, your walls will mold and crumble from the inside, resulting in potentially toxic air and crumbling buildings.

    It is a GREAT insulated construction, but it really has to be done correctly the first time, otherwise it's a bit of a disaster ;)
     
  19. jay13

    jay13 New Member

    417
    Apr 12, 2009
    Central NC
    good point... maybe just better as a temp construction over winter then... Making me think now too... but we have WAAAAAy too much humidity here in the summer to even consider it.