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Oh hey look, ANOTHER post. Y’all are probably thinking “holy crow, this lady is crazy!” I have temporary housing for my goats at the moment - a nice, wooden shed where they have some sturdy “shelving” to jump up on. This is perfectly awesome until we start getting heavy snow. The trek from the back deck to the shed is about, oh, 500+ feet. Not so bad, right? Well… when we get a butt-load of snow, it literally will pile up to my waist - I’m talking 2 feet minimum when we get lots of snow, and up to 4+ feet with storms (I live in upstate New York, very rural, up on top of a giant hill). Shoveling is going to be quite difficult. I mean, I’m strong enough to a point, but it’s MURDER on my back when we start to get that wet, heavy, snowman making snow.

I have a guy down the road who breeds dairy and show goats. We went to school together and I’m pretty sure if not for him helping me figure out how to get Flower to take a bottle, we would have been in real trouble. He uses a pole barn, beds them down really well, has structures to keep them off the ground (or wood flooring, I can’t remember). He let me know that yes, a sturdy, anchored galvanized steel shed would be perfectly fine provided they have been bedded down very well, free of drafts. He realized, well, I only have two young boys. We talked about insulation, but both acknowledged there is NO WAY to safely insulate the inside (too much risk for them eating it) unless I spend a fortune on lumber to put in to cover the insulation. I had a plan to get this 8x12 shed that we could expand as they got older. The problem? They wanted 3500$. Sure, I could do a payment plan for 60 months at 140 a month. Not horrible, right? Well, unless you pay it off within 90 days, that 60 month agreement ends up with me paying almost 9000$ for the shed. Sure, in the short-run that works, but it’s just not possible right now. I have someone willing to help me get an 8x10 steel shed for now, which can then be moved to the backyard for storage in the spring until I can get them the shed I want (this is NOT bragging, but I’m a single mom who makes… uh, well, NOT a lot of money as an adjunct college professor, so I tend to get a larger chunk of tax returns) and pay up front, or get the kit to build my own (it’s just the framing, joists, etc.)

I’ve read through TONS of posts about housing - wooden sheds, steel sheds, barns, 3 sided shelters vs. 4 sided. Some are older, some are newer. BUT, not all of them really answered some of my questions. This is all temporary - so, if I have to get the steel shed (about 370$) for the winter, how should I bed them down? I read to get some flooring in there, or some structures to keep them off the ground, as well as putting down dirt, pine bedding, AND straw. I don’t know if a steel shed can be insulated from the outside… I really, REALLY don’t want a 3 sided shelter. The wind up here constantly changes direction, not to mention last winter we had -15 degrees at times! I’m freaking out, honestly. My step-father has been promising me since June that he would help. We have a rather large carport - it has a slanted, shingled roof, 22.5 feet long, 10.5 feet wide, and about 10 or 11 feet tall. Lumber from the Amish is the cheapest while still having good quality. I’ve measured like he asked, I’ve talked to people about PAYING them to clean HIS stuff out from underneath, and he promised that he would help me close it in if I got the lumber. Well, he’s close with the Amish near us, and still hasn’t asked for lumber prices, and also changed his mind saying I can only have 1/3 of the carport. I do not know what to do. I can keep them in the nice wooden shed until about November at the latest, but they ABSOLUTELY have to have a structure closer to the house by then. I am panicking. I just… don’t know what to do that isn’t going to cost me thousands of dollars (which I have literally already spent since I got them in June, getting them healthy, which NO complaints here). I just… don’t have that kind of money with all the bills I’m paying and no income until my paycheck at the end of September.

I am SO sorry for being so long winded, but I’m really desperate for solutions. I can find people to help me move/assemble things, but I really don’t know how to go about this. If I had the size heard that my friend has, I wouldn’t worry about a steel structure as they could help each other stay warm, but these little guys… I’m begging y’all for ANYTHING. I’m so sorry to be a worry wart, panicking all the time, but my pets are my kids (haha, see what I did there). I mean… I spent 4500$ 4 years ago to amputate my cat’s leg and save him from cancer (he’s 15 now, and OMG the best cat ever, but I digress). I will literally go without groceries if I have to and live on gluten free cereal, but I won’t have a large amount of money until the END of February, so… yeah. I’m just repeating myself now, and that’s 100% annoying haha.

I am so grateful for all of you ♥
 
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Hi. I understand..lumber is Krazy expensive. I go to Craigslist. They have people giving away buildings if you move them. I used a tractor & a trailer and moved one on my place. Ive bought sheet metal from businesses that have scrap sheet metal for cheaper price. Its usually a perfect length for goat shelters. I use wooden fence posts and wooden pallets for walls. Then useing sheet metal screws, add on the metal. Inside the wooden pallets i stuff old feed bags for insulation. Its paper, wont hurt them if the eat some of it. Also to raise them off the ground, wooden pallets, throw a rubber mat over them. Then wood chips, then hay. Just keep layering throughthe winter. Its just real fun to clean out in Spring(not). But the layering generates heat for winter.
But any bargain lumber stores, farmers with barn metal laying around, business with scrap sheet metal. Hope this helps. I understand about barn costs. I put the money into the herd, and not the buildings. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi. I understand..lumber is Krazy expensive. I go to Craigslist. They have people giving away buildings if you move them. I used a tractor & a trailer and moved one on my place. Ive bought sheet metal from businesses that have scrap sheet metal for cheaper price. Its usually a perfect length for goat shelters. I use wooden fence posts and wooden pallets for walls. Then useing sheet metal screws, add on the metal. Inside the wooden pallets i stuff old feed bags for insulation. Its paper, wont hurt them if the eat some of it. Also to raise them off the ground, wooden pallets, throw a rubber mat over them. Then wood chips, then hay. Just keep layering throughthe winter. Its just real fun to clean out in Spring(not). But the layering generates heat for winter.
But any bargain lumber stores, farmers with barn metal laying around, business with scrap sheet metal. Hope this helps. I understand about barn costs. I put the money into the herd, and not the buildings. Good luck.
IT does help. Anything does. I’ll keep an eye out. I did look at some craigslist stuff; they said they were in the area i live in, and then they were actually like 3 hours away. I think once i start getting income again this will be easier. I realize I panic a lot; i just don’t like waiting until last minute because winter can be so unpredictable up here. I take every bit of advice into consideration. So, thank you :)
 
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Make sure what ever shelter you choose can handle the weight of snow. Those thin metal buildings won't. I like the ideas given above. Check local Craig's list and FB sites for used material. You can even build a hoop shelter out of cattle panels and a very sturdy tarp. Search pinterest for good plans for that. It can be built up close to the house too and moved around if built of skids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Make sure what ever shelter you choose can handle the weight of snow. Those thin metal buildings won't. I like the ideas given above. Check local Craig's list and FB sites for used material. You can even build a hoop shelter out of cattle panels and a very sturdy tarp. Search pinterest for good plans for that. It can be built up close to the house too and moved around if built of skids.
I definitely wouldn’t be able to do the tarp thing. We get heavy snow and it would just collapse that right down. I’m looking for used stuff on craigslist now - none of it looks great so I’ll keep looking! :)
 

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With a cattle panel hoop style shelter..the panel supports the tarp like in this picture. I have seen them done with pallet sides for added durability. Definitely would need a back to this one and have the opening face away from wind. It's deep enough to make bedding way in the back and plenty of room for hay rack and feeder.
 

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Another option..it might work. We bought craftsman building at Lowes for about $800. It has a floor, its heavy duty type plastic stuff, double walled. It might work to get you through this winter. Time to save some $$$$ till Spring . Then use it to hold feed or lawnmower. Its 12×12 and 7 ft tall.
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Oh hey look, ANOTHER post. Y’all are probably thinking “holy crow, this lady is crazy!”
Please, we are all stewing in our own forms of crazy, here, so please don't think we would call out on your crazy!
Crazy bonds us all together. It works for us.:geek:

The hoop house, if built correctly, WILL take the snow. It is one of the cheaper, temporary options you have.
The craftsman shed also looks doable but maybe that $ is also too much.
Pallets with some kind of cover (depends on how close the boaards are nailed) may be your best choice for dry flooring.
Straw, leaves, pellet bedding, all that is after the building.
Basically you have to have some kind of wind break, and a place that stays dry.
Snow also insulates. Will you be feeding/watering inside the building?
When, typically, does your winter weather start?
 

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Plastic sheds:
I've found that, although attractive and easy to assemble at first, they can have a relatively short life. The plastic becomes more brittle in the cold and can warp in the warm. And before you know it the doors don't close well anymore. The real problem is they are difficult to repair. No doubt the experience of others varies.
 

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The panels run $25 - $30 each, for 2 goats, 1 panel should do but 2 would be nicer. Instead of cheap plastic tarps, buy repurposed outdoor sign material, usually easily found online or Craig's List..
Pallets or scrap lumber to build a frame for the base....same for the ends/doors.
They don't last forever but will last until spring if well attached and the tarp pulled snug.
You need a roll of gorilla tape for pinhole leaks, some kind of flooring.
 
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