how big of a risk?

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by crow, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. crow

    crow New Member

    39
    Sep 6, 2009
    Iowa
    Hello, I could use some advice/knowledge, I do alot of carpentry work for folks and I have been working on a Ladys barn, They have about 45 goats and lets just say that she does not take care of goats the way most do, (ill just say it) These poor goats are walking death, half are blind! their eyes look really bad, every goat there has really bad diarreha, I told her I noticed they didnt have any baking soda and she asked why they would need that, I am really worried about my herd , I take my boots off in the van and leave them in it along with any tools used there. bathe as soon as I walk in, is this enough to keep my herd safe? how risky is this? I would like really really freak out if my herd caught anything. what would you do? I wish now that I would turned the job down. but I geuss you cant ask folks if they got any dying animals on their farm before working for them... it makes me very nervious. any help?
     
  2. Epona142

    Epona142 The farm that Hope began

    May 25, 2008
    Madisonville, TX
    Your best bet is to follow strict quarantine habits. I've had to work in similar situations with other animals when doing rescue.

    When you come home, strip, preferably in a mud room or something. Clothes you wore go straight into a hot wash.

    And you go straight into a hot shower.

    Absolutely disinfect your shoes EVERY time, and any other objects that come into contact with the sickly animals.

    You should be sparkly clean when you visit your goats after work.

    The risk is real, but with proper management, you can do it.
     

  3. crow

    crow New Member

    39
    Sep 6, 2009
    Iowa
    Cool then Im doing about all I can do as thats about how Ive been doing it. Thanks allot man, you hepled calm my nerves, I was starting freak! Thanks :thumb:
     
  4. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    I agree with Epona. Do not go near your goats after you have returned home until you have taken a shower and changed clothes, BE SURE to disinfect your hands very well before handling your goats. I personally would throw the shoes that you use when you go to that house once you are done with the barn unless they're really expensive then just disinfect them VERY well. That is to bad that lady's herd looks so terrible. I wish she understood that goats should not look like that or if she does then to do something about it...that's not good at all!
     
  5. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    You did the correct thing. Make sure those shoes are bleached before you wear them to your barn.

    It is so sad to see how other take care or should I say do NOT take care of their herd. What kind of goats are they? I feel so bad for them
     
  6. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    How contagious it it really depends on what the goats have. Pink eye is really contagious, im not saying this is what the goats have but pink eye can cause blindness. Like the others said bleacing your shoes each and every time before you walk on your property, having a bottle of bleach water in the car is a good idea, and not just the shoes you wear to her place, all of them. Even if you bleach your shoes before you get out you still wore them in your car, carpet is a breeding ground for bacteria. showering before handeling your own goats and changing clothes.
    I even do this between my own goats and the dairy i work at. And the owner of the dairy is as anal as i am about cleanliness and testing for diseases.
    beth
     
  7. Not trying to "stir the pot", but if it's that bad shouldn't animal control be called and at least try to educate her?? I dunno I have ZERO tollerance for people who don't take care of thier animals. They are at our mercy, we've made them ours therefor our responsibility to take care of them PROPERLY! :angry:
    Sorry I get a little wound!
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I have to agree with the others.....they have given you the best advice....nothing more to add there... :wink: :thumbup:

    I know how you feel ... :hug: ...animals need full care.....to be healthy.....and happy.... :hug:

    it all really depends... on if ....they just got them... at the auction already in that condition.. ........it does sound like ...she needs to be educated...though.....

    I for one........ had a bad experience.......before we even had goats... about someone calling animal control on us...without asking questions ............We purchased a horse in need.. at an auction............he weighed 700 lbs....and was almost on his death bed... in which... this 16 hand high animal ...should of weighed ...way over a thousand lbs.....well...... my DH and I...... felt so sorry ..........for old "Herb".... we took him home... floated his teeth....started him on a good diet...wormed him ...groomed him ect...... To find out... a week later......animal control ...left a note saying... you must get in contact with animal control.......... we proved... that we just bought him... from the Auction....but had to pay... the big fee ...to get him back....when we ...didn't do anything wrong.... :doh: ...

    It took a long time but he eventually ....gained back alot of weight and the kids ... were able to ride and enjoy him..... :wink:
     
  9. redneck_acres

    redneck_acres New Member

    Oct 17, 2007
    Idaho
    Yeah, if those animals are as bad off as you say they are-then i'd call animal control. And a good rule of thumb all goat breeders should use is to either clean their shoes after going on someone else's farm(unless you know 100 percent that they are disease free) or have a special pair you only wear on other folks' farm.
     
  10. crow

    crow New Member

    39
    Sep 6, 2009
    Iowa
    Well to right honest bout it I wanted to slap the taste right outta their mouths! and I did think about turning it in, but I got a break in the ordeal today, I am going to help these folks out, I had time today to kinda talk to them about their herd and found out they are just totally clueless, and they agreed to let me show them how and when to trim hooves and mineral info ect. ect. I am making them up a list of things that need done, dont know why folks would get that many goats and not have a clue as to their needs :? but I do feel that I was sent there for a reason, now I know. If it where my choice Im "very" sorry to have to say at least 40% would need a lead pill, its too late, their in really bad shape. I am going to try and help, I just hope by doing so nothing comes my way from this herd, and yes I agree it should be turned in, but I will give knowledge over judgement the first time, after that no way. caller in! Thanks for your reply's CRow.
     
  11. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    Thats great! So glad they are willing to learn.
    beth
     
  12. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I am glad ...they are allowing you to help...that is terrific news....... :hug: :thumbup:

    hope the goats... will make a good turn around...... :pray:
     
  13. Well everything happens for a reason, it's all a plan bigger than us. It's nice that you are taking time out of your life to help them, not many people would do that anymore. :angel2:
    Hopefully you can save some of them. Maybe you can talk them into keeping only a few, as this would lessen the work and cost involved.
    I will be praying for you to have the right words to speak to these people.
    KUDOS to you! :thumbup:
     
  14. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Guest

    101
    Oct 12, 2009
    Hopefully you can help them at least save some of their goats. That is really sad, and too bad for those poor animals that their owners did not get educated before buying them.

    I know someone who got in trouble with a rescued horse also. The guy bought a really skinny abused horse that was in terrible shape, covered in wounds and scars and just very sickly. He put it in a corral on his farm and was getting it back into condition and someone took pictures of it and animal control tried to take it, and pictures of the horse were all over the news because he was a big-name person in town...While a horse I called animal control about that was really being neglected never got any help. They were keeping this poor little horse in a chain link dog kennel in which it could barely turn around and had no shelter, in Colorado in the mountains where it gets to -40 sometimes at night, and they just threw a little bad food in every now and then on the ground which was about a foot deep in manure. Animal control just told me that they didn't want to deal with livestock, and 'it's a low income area, so people can't afford vet care, fencing, etc...' I understand about not having the money for all the nice things, since I'm in that predicament myself, but if it is bad enough that your animals are getting sick from poor care...it would be more loving to give them up, even though it is hard to do.
     
  15. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    I think we all agree that people do abuse animals either out of stupidity or out of shear negligence but crow here has stated that these individuals just weren't educated about proper goat care. They are willing to work to improve the conditions and help their animals.

    discussion about abused animals aren't pertinent to the topic of this thread so lets keep it on topic :thumb:
     
  16. crow

    crow New Member

    39
    Sep 6, 2009
    Iowa
    Thanks folks, after working around there for a few days I have seen that These folks do love their goatys and they just didnt know sqwat about them, I dont belive they meant any harm, and they can afford to properly care for the herd, its just a plain lack of knowledge, I am afraid there is pink eye really bad in several, a few are stone blind, now pink eye is like very contagious right? I havent touched any with the eye problem, can they be helped? They are willing to send some to the vet and get testing done, so thats their first step to getting it right, I may have to explain to them that some wont make it, I hope they can understand what may need to be done to save the ones that can be saved, This herd is a mixed up bloodline of boer and nuby and even some pigmy's and some I have no clue? I think these might have came from sale barns and such, in a few months they'll be looking good! Ihope and prey. Thanks.
     
  17. Sounds like we get a happy ending!! :leap:
     
  18. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    yes pink eye can be treated -- going blind isnt an end all just sometimes part of the illness. yes it is highly contagious. I have some information on my website www.endofthelinefarm.com because I dealt with it once before. Strangely only one goat got the illness and everyone else was fine.

    I certainly would strongly suggest they get a vet out.

    They should have fecals run to determin what they are dealing with specifically parasite wise so they can target correctly with the right wormer and or cocci medication.

    THey shoudl have a good grain, hay and loose mineral and from there it is just time.
     
  19. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    I would ruin fecals no questions asked on at least two thirds of the herd if not everyone. As for the pink eye it can be treated with terrimycin and pen, usually but like stacey said i would have a vet out to determine how bad it really is. Be really carful as people can also get pink eye from goats.
    beth