How do you know what they need?

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Korita, Jan 12, 2018 at 4:24 PM.

  1. Korita

    Korita New Member

    28
    Thursday
    Iowa
    Our goats have been healthy since we got them. But reading more and more, especially since we should be having kids soon, I’m nervous about my goats being deficient of something. How do you know? They always have fresh water, hay, mineral block they have free access to that seems to have everything that is frequently mentioned in posts (iodine, selenium, copper, etc) and they get grains. But I’m worried about my pregnant girls.

    We did a fecal to see if they needed to be wormed before kidding and the herd is all clean. But what about the other things? Is a block not right? Should they have lose minerals instead? Should I be giving this gel stuff I’ve read about?

    How do you know? Should I be sampling blood or something? Just signs? I want to be sure I do right by my goats. I’m so nervous.
     
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  2. Lstein

    Lstein Well-Known Member

    Oct 2, 2014
    North Dakota
    Without really knowing a whole lot about your goats/set up/etc, I can safely say switching to a good loose mineral and ditch the block is a great first step.

    Some signs of what to look for, for lack of copper and/or selenium are:

    The rest of the article can be found here.

    Not saying yours are deficient, it's just a common thing with goats. Plus they would get more benefit out of a loose mineral.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018 at 4:59 PM

  3. Lstein

    Lstein Well-Known Member

    Oct 2, 2014
    North Dakota
    What gel stuff were you seeing mentioned specifically? The only gel stuff I can think of is pro-bios, which is a handy thing to keep on hand but is something you would give when they're not feeling well; not for a preventive/supplement.
     
  4. Kath G.

    Kath G. Active Member

    200
    Jul 13, 2017
    Wisconsin
    Gel stuff could also be replamin, replamin plus, vit e/selenium gel, a calcium gel....

    When you're looking at a mineral supplement, a lot of people have good results with Manna Pro Goat mineral. It's a pretty good loose mineral, carried by some big names and thus usually easy to find, and I think I remember from one of your other posts that you have a smaller herd (sorry if I'm confusing you with someone else!). People with larger herds usually start looking for something that comes in a bigger bag, lol.

    eta Back to your original question, most people with goats become familiar with minor signs of deficiency to diagnose where their herd needs supplementation. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for really finding out where your goats are at on minerals; but, that has to be from healthy animals. For people who are butchering wethers for meat, that's a great way to go; but not everyone does that. That's where paying close attention to symptoms comes in.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018 at 6:03 PM
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  5. SalteyLove

    SalteyLove Well-Known Member

    Jun 18, 2011
    New England
    Post photos of your goats- full body side shots including head and tails. We can show you and tell you.
     
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  6. Korita

    Korita New Member

    28
    Thursday
    Iowa
    I tried to get some good body pictures while they were eating this morning. I found some loose goat minerals at a different town as my local store doesn’t carry them. I also found beet pulp pellets and read those are good for them too. And grabbed some b-complex to have on hand just in case.

    I don’t see any fishtail going on. Nelli has really hollowed out more now and Lucy is starting to hollow a bit too.

    Our buck is skiddish so this is he best I could get of him lol

    The girls have been really loud this morning too. I don’t know if it’s because our buck is outside the garage or because I was a bit later than normal to get them their grain. But they pigged out on it like they haven’t eaten in days then went right back to hollering non stop.

    I appreciate everyone’s help and am so glad I joined this group!
     

    Attached Files:

  7. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Loose salts and minerals are better than the blocks.

    Most your goats look good, as in coat color and condition. The goats in the last 2 pics look a bit rough.

    The first pic, the goat is really sunken in the flanks? As mentioned, when is their due dates?
     
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  9. Korita

    Korita New Member

    28
    Thursday
    Iowa
    The Oberhasli in the last 2 pictures is our buck. He’s not taking too kindly to being separated from the girls. I’m thinking if we get a buck we will keep him as a whether for a friend for him.

    As for the girls.... I don’t have a due date. That’s part of my craziness. We let them all stay together until this week. (Won’t be doing hat again because I can’t take the stress of the guessing game) I saw mountings in August and September so I’m guessing anytime between now and February. The vet is coming to ultrasound his Friday but they’re all starting to drop and Nelli (the girl without horns in the first picture) has really hollowed out in the last day or two. So I don’t know if she’ll be in labor soon or if they drop quite a while before kidding?
     
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  10. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  11. Korita

    Korita New Member

    28
    Thursday
    Iowa
    Iv
    I’ve seen this said many times but what does it mean? They keep you guessing and waiting forever? Lol
     
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  12. Goat_Scout

    Goat_Scout Well-Known Member

    Mar 23, 2017
    Louisiana
    Doe Code of Honor

    The doe's secret code of honor is as old as goats themselves and is the species best kept secret. No doe shall ever kid before its time. (Its time being determined by the following factors):

    1- No kid shall be born until total chaos has been reached by all involved. Your owner's house must be a wreck, their family hungry and desperate for clean clothes, and their social life nonexistent.

    2- "Midwives" must reach the babbling fool status before you kid out. Bloodshot eyes, tangled hair and the inability to form a sentence mean the time is getting close.

    3- For every bell, beeper, camera or whistle they attach to you, kidding must be delayed by at least one day for each item. If they use an audio monitor, one good yell per hour will keep things interesting.

    4- If you hear the words, "She's nowhere near ready. She'll be fine while we're away for the weekend," Wait until they load the car, then begin pushing!

    5- Owner stress must be at an all time high! If you are in the care of someone else, ten to fifteen phone calls a day is a sign you're getting close.

    6- When you hear the words "I can't take it anymore!" wait at least three more days.

    7 -You must keep this waiting game interesting. False alarms are mandatory! Little teasers such as looking at your stomach, pushing your food around in the bucket and then walking away from it, and nesting, are always good for a rise. Be creative and find new things to do to keep the adrenaline pumping in those who wait.

    8- The honor of all goats is now in your hands. Use this time to avenge all of your barn mates. Think about your friend who had to wear that silly costume in front of those people. Hang onto that baby for another day. OH, they made him do tricks too! Three more days seems fair. Late feedings, the dreaded diet, bad haircuts, those awful wormings can also be avenged at this time.

    9- If you have fulfilled all of the above and are still not sure when to have the kids, listen to the weather forecast on the radio that has been so generously provided by those who wait. Severe storm warning is what you're waiting for. In the heart of the storm jump into action! The power could go out and you could have the last laugh. You have a good chance of those who wait missing the whole thing while searching for a flashlight that works!

    10- Make the most of your interrupted nights. Beg for food each time someone comes into the barn to check you. Your barn mates will love you as the extra goodies fall their way too.

    Remember, this code of honor was designed to remind man of how truly special goats are. Do your best to reward those who wait with a beautiful doeling to carry on the Doe Code of Honor for the next generation of those who wait.
     
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  13. Korita

    Korita New Member

    28
    Thursday
    Iowa
    Oh my gosh I am dying of laughter! Thank you so much for sharing!!!!!
     
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  14. Pejink

    Pejink New Member

    17
    Dec 16, 2017
  15. Kath G.

    Kath G. Active Member

    200
    Jul 13, 2017
    Wisconsin
    Then there's the live action version on YouTube:
     
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  16. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Yep, the Doe code of honor, love the video. :)
     
  17. Korita

    Korita New Member

    28
    Thursday
    Iowa
    Speaking of the doe code of Honor...... we are going ice fishing this afternoon. I’m reluctant to leave. I really need to invest in a WiFi baby monitor ;) A friend of ours is going to stop out and check in them later this afternoon. I don’t think they’ll be having babies today but then again I will be over an hour away and I told them no babies because I was leaving.
     
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