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It is impractical to remove the cap, so I can only cram about 20 bales in, if the tail gate is down.
Yeah, that's the problem with caps, toppers, and cages--they're hard to get on and off if your truck is a multi-use farm vehicle and you also haul goats in it several times a week. It's a good thing we live in a place with lots of sunshine so my guys don't really need a roof when hauling. We blanket them during winter hauling if the trip is longer than 20 minutes or so. I suggest blanketing any goat being hauled in an open bed (tied or in a cage), especially on the highway. Wind chill can be brutal. They either need a proper enclosed shelter or blankets if the weather is cold. If it's raining or snowing, they need an enclosed shelter unless it's a very short trip.
 

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I have big goats so I got the tallest canopy (topper) I could find which was a Leer 122. Do not tie them in there. Have a rubber mat down, then back half a closed cell foam pad with straw. Full length sliders with screen on each side of the canopy and one on front as well so lots of ventilation when needed.
 

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I just put them in the backseat of my impala. I just put a blanket over the seat. It's and old police car so has plastic seats anyhow for easy cleaning. I have even carried two full grown nubian bucks back there together... that gets you some odd looks on the highway! :crazy:
 

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Yep been there and done that with them riding in the vehicle! Here's a pic from my kids 2nd year/first real year showing in 4-H. Had to take 5 young does to get health papers and one had to have a state tag inserted so she could be shown as a commercial doe. Put down the seats, put down tarps and bedding. It was so much fun riding with them like this. We did have to put a bully in a dog crate. One of the does stood or laid down with her head between the front seats watching dvd player with my son and watching the road in front of us.
We bought a trailer probably a week later....then had to upgrade to a bigger one..and a bigger one.. lol

 

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I agree wholly with not tying goats, but...like in some big emergency or something, would cross-tying be any better? I know that's how you're supposed to tie a dog in an open truck bed, & it's used for horses to keep them in place better. Just curious--my goats ride in the back of my mini-van. I fold down the seats, put down a new tarp, & then some old cardboard & then a bit of shavings. Then I can sort of roll up the tarp with everything in it once we're home again.
 

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I agree wholly with not tying goats, but...like in some big emergency or something, would cross-tying be any better? I know that's how you're supposed to tie a dog in an open truck bed, & it's used for horses to keep them in place better. Just curious--my goats ride in the back of my mini-van. I fold down the seats, put down a new tarp, & then some old cardboard & then a bit of shavings. Then I can sort of roll up the tarp with everything in it once we're home again.
I honestly wouldn't even cross tie. Goats are so naughty... I've seen them get their leg over the rope/lead where you wouldn't think they could do it, and then they end up twisting themselves up and can either suffocate or break a leg. Difference I think is horses are so much bigger and goats just seem to be able to bend themselves in whatever direction they want to go.

Just like the pic I posted above, I used to do the same thing you do with your minivan. All of our first goats came home in the back of my SUV!
My kids showed around 13 goats last summer (does, wethers and bucks) between the 3 of them, so no way they are fitting inside a vehicle lol
 

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I cross-tie goats that are not trained to stand tied in a truck bed yet if I can't use the center of the headache rack. I also cross-tie goats that are being mean to other goats during the ride. Horses, because of their size, strength, and ridiculously long necks and legs, are much more dangerous to themselves when tied than goats are! Goats are also a heck of a lot smarter than horses. They figure out leading and tying much faster and with fewer incidents. If creatures as dumb and panicky and accident-prone as horses can learn to stand tied, then goats certainly can! In my experience, goats are even smarter about riding in truck beds than dogs and won't even attempt to leap out once the truck is moving. I don't think we give goats enough credit.

That said, my first goat always preferred to ride in the back seat of a sedan. His favorite ride was my '88 Buick because it had the cushiest plush seat. After the Buick died we bought a '59 Fury and the back seat wasn't as comfy, but it was roomier. We trained him to to lay down when he rode in the car because he was too big to stand up and his horns weren't good for the headliner. It also helped keep him from going to the bathroom during the trip, but we always put a waterproof mattress pad over the seat for longer trips "just in case". It also protected the upholstery from his sharp hooves.

The "GoatMobile" - (My younger goats have no idea what they're missing, and it's a good thing too because if they did there would be a full-scale revolt and I'd never get them to jump willingly into an open truck bed again!)
Automotive parking light Wheel Tire Car Vehicle
Car Vehicle Motor vehicle Wheel Hood
 

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Everyone has their preferred method of carrying their goats. If it works for you then great. Myself, I used a goat panel and some 2 inch 14 gage angle iron and manufactured a cage large enough to just fit between the wheel wells and it has a gate that is half the width of the cage. Of course the cage has a top but no bottom. I tie it down to the cargo hooks so it doesn't move forward or backwards. In cold weather I have ply wood sides and top that just fit the cage to protect against the wind. I don't like to carry a goat in cold weather and don't. I pile hay into the bed of the truck/cage for bedding so the goat can stand or lie down which ever it chooses. It is safe for the goat, the goat isn't getting out of it and the cage works in hot or cool weather. :devil:
 

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Like TexasGoatMan, I prefer a cage to tying or transporting in "people" spaces. I wanted something that met these criteria:
  1. Lightweight, so I can load/unload/lift by myself.
  2. Fits flat on the bed of all of my trucks and trailers
  3. Can be divided if necessary
  4. Low cost
So, this meant it would be a custom job. We used 1.25" UV-resistant "electric conduit" PVC, combined with FORMUFIT connectors. Dimensions can be whatever fits your vehicle(s), but we made sure the L, H, and W are all multiples of 4. This is to fit sections of "utility panel" fabric, as my local McCoy's calls it, which is sold in 48"x20' panels and has fairly goat-proof 4" squares. I used stainless hose clamps to hold the fabric sections to the frame. 3.5" vinyl vertical blind slats woven into the roof and top of the side panels provide sun & wind protection. Not pictured is a panel I cut of the same fabric that can be suspended from the top as a divider using carabiners or similar.

Here are a couple of pictures. One of my grandson helping me "test" the door swing :), and one holding a few goats headed for a new paddock.

Chin Shorts Vertebrate White Product
Wheel Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Motor vehicle
 

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That is nice Saddlebronc! I've seen some homemade trailers somewhat similar that people use for hauling a couple of market goats to shows, and they are really nice.

I cross-tie goats that are not trained to stand tied in a truck bed yet if I can't use the center of the headache rack. I also cross-tie goats that are being mean to other goats during the ride. Horses, because of their size, strength, and ridiculously long necks and legs, are much more dangerous to themselves when tied than goats are! Goats are also a heck of a lot smarter than horses. They figure out leading and tying much faster and with fewer incidents. If creatures as dumb and panicky and accident-prone as horses can learn to stand tied, then goats certainly can! In my experience, goats are even smarter about riding in truck beds than dogs and won't even attempt to leap out once the truck is moving. I don't think we give goats enough credit.

That said, my first goat always preferred to ride in the back seat of a sedan. His favorite ride was my '88 Buick because it had the cushiest plush seat. After the Buick died we bought a '59 Fury and the back seat wasn't as comfy, but it was roomier. We trained him to to lay down when he rode in the car because he was too big to stand up and his horns weren't good for the headliner. It also helped keep him from going to the bathroom during the trip, but we always put a waterproof mattress pad over the seat for longer trips "just in case". It also protected the upholstery from his sharp hooves.

The "GoatMobile" - (My younger goats have no idea what they're missing, and it's a good thing too because if they did there would be a full-scale revolt and I'd never get them to jump willingly into an open truck bed again!) View attachment 126527 View attachment 126528
I know you have done this, but I've not met anyone in person that has successfully tied a goat that didn't almost kill itself. I still feel it is better to be safe than sorry.
I've actually worked with horses years ago, mares and foals on a thoroughbred breeding farm (my husband has been working with horses for many years), and they were super easy to lead train and train to tie. But we started them as foals. One person walks mom, the other walks the foal. Within a week or so, one person would lead foal and mom to pen/paddock.
We had 17 mares & foals in our barn, and about 30 mares out in 2 fields behind our barn. We herded them up into 2 pens between barn and their fields, that had eyehooks mounted in the walls around the 'corral'. About 15 mares in each pen, tied with bungee ties with snaps on each end. During breeding season, they'd bring the teaser pony in, and that's where he'd tease the mares to see if any were ready to be bred (all were 'barren' mares). Then we'd feed them after he left. Seldom did we ever have any issues. The only time we had any problems at all is if someone accidentally spooked a mare and she'd break her bungee tie. We once had a mare who must have been injected with testosterone before she was sent to us, because she would act very studly, and would try to mount the mares. That was the worst time ever with having them ties, but the bungee ties would break under pressure, which made them very safe to use. That mare was nuts and she was also pregnant at that time lol.
So with that said, I'd rather deal with horses being tied up than a goat. Goats are smart, meaning they can find fast ways to get themselves into serious trouble.
 

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Well, we can agree to disagree. I've been training horses for most of my life, so I'm not just making up stuff when I say I think goats are easier and safer. I agree that training horses to lead is usually quite simple and safe if done correctly. Goats just happen to be even easier in my opinion, and smarter in the sense that they are better at NOT getting themselves into trouble with a rope.

Any goat that can't be tethered safely is completely useless as a pack animal, and yet that is what many people use goats for. Most of them tether their goats on a low line in camp at night and no one watches them after lights out. None of their goats are dead from entanglement. So rather than say, "They're doing it wrong!" you have to ask, "What are these people doing right to have better outcomes than all my friends?"

Occasionally I have to tie a goat in the trailer (yes, out of view and unattended) because it is determined to abuse its trailer mates. I've had fewer problems with goats tied in the trailer than with horses tied in the trailer. I don't want anyone reading this thread to think it is always wrong and dangerous to tie a goat during transport. Sometimes leaving them loose is far more dangerous. Not all of us have compartmentalized trailers and truck cages and it's important to keep our options open. If you're using the right equipment and adjusting it properly, then there's no reason why a goat should get itself into a dangerous situation just because it's tied up.
 

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We are suppose to pick our kids up in a few months. I have a Forester and figure with a tarp under it, I can use a x-large dog crate. When they are adults, same thing only in the back area on tarps and shavings.
 

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Well, we can agree to disagree. I've been training horses for most of my life, so I'm not just making up stuff when I say I think goats are easier and safer. I agree that training horses to lead is usually quite simple and safe if done correctly. Goats just happen to be even easier in my opinion, and smarter in the sense that they are better at NOT getting themselves into trouble with a rope.

Any goat that can't be tethered safely is completely useless as a pack animal, and yet that is what many people use goats for. Most of them tether their goats on a low line in camp at night and no one watches them after lights out. None of their goats are dead from entanglement. So rather than say, "They're doing it wrong!" you have to ask, "What are these people doing right to have better outcomes than all my friends?"

Occasionally I have to tie a goat in the trailer (yes, out of view and unattended) because it is determined to abuse its trailer mates. I've had fewer problems with goats tied in the trailer than with horses tied in the trailer. I don't want anyone reading this thread to think it is always wrong and dangerous to tie a goat during transport. Sometimes leaving them loose is far more dangerous. Not all of us have compartmentalized trailers and truck cages and it's important to keep our options open. If you're using the right equipment and adjusting it properly, then there's no reason why a goat should get itself into a dangerous situation just because it's tied up.
I have much respect for your comments and input, and am glad you are able to do so, and that pack goats are popular in your area.
I feel that in order to risk tying a goat, you have to know what you are doing, just like with a horse. How many people would read this topic and think, oh okay, we'll tie our goat. I'd feel awful if not giving a warning to prevent something bad from happening.
We've been to a lot of goat shows, with a lot of goats, with all sorts of ways of transporting, but never seen anyone tie their goats, and everyone cautions against it.
Sad thing is I don't know anyone in our area, or state that has pack goats.

Did you train horses for show or pleasure? I worked with race horses. I miss it very much, but with young kids I had to give it up. I do media work instead at the local racetrack during the race meet and major sales, some eventing coverage, and stuff like the KY Derby.
 

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Maybe everyone cautions against tying goats because none of them have bothered to take the little time required to train their goats to tie safely. Unfortunately, people tend to take goats for granted because they are small and weak compared to horses and cattle. It can take 2-3 hours and a half a dozen strong men to force an untrained horse into a trailer, and you only hope that no one is maimed or killed in the process. Therefore we take time to train the horse so we don't face a dangerous and cruel scenario when transporting him. Untrained goats, being smaller, weaker, and less panicky than horses, can generally be manhandled into a truck or trailer by one or two people in half a minute. Therefore we tend to take goats for granted and not bother training them for practical things like loading up on command or standing patiently while tied in a truck or trailer.

I've trained horses for pleasure, show, carriage, and ranch work. I enjoy jumping, cross-country eventing, hunter pace, trail riding, cattle sorting, team penning, carriage driving, and most recently obstacle course challenges. I also love to teach riding lessons during the summer. I've ridden horses my whole life and currently own two of them. Goats are a more recent passion of mine, but I've found them much easier to train than horses, less panicky, and more intelligent about staying still and waiting for help when they get caught in a rope or fence.

I've seen your photos from the racetrack. Great work! My husband and I enjoyed visiting the Kentucky Horse Park in 2016.
 

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I think many times, especially in the showing world, people either don't take their goats away from home often - especially if they only do their county fair show each year. Or have multiple goats. I know families who show about 6-14 goats between their kids. My kids showed something like 13 goats last year.

I've become a bit lazy this past year, and haven't posted as many photos as I usually do. Typically upload to the website I work for and randomly upload to flickr. I have so many pictures sitting on computers/hard drives it's pathetic that I haven't done more with them.
Seems like we chatted about your 2016 visit, or maybe that was someone else? Did you go for a particular event? I live about 15 minutes from the horse Park (Midway/Versailles). My husband has been working with horses for 20 years, he works at a horse farm down the road from the horse park. I love the horse park, but lately I only seem to go for the 3 day event.
 

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Like TexasGoatMan, I prefer a cage to tying or transporting in "people" spaces. I wanted something that met these criteria:
  1. Lightweight, so I can load/unload/lift by myself.
  2. Fits flat on the bed of all of my trucks and trailers
  3. Can be divided if necessary
  4. Low cost
So, this meant it would be a custom job. We used 1.25" UV-resistant "electric conduit" PVC, combined with FORMUFIT connectors. Dimensions can be whatever fits your vehicle(s), but we made sure the L, H, and W are all multiples of 4. This is to fit sections of "utility panel" fabric, as my local McCoy's call:D:devil:s it, which is sold in 48"x20' panels and has fairly goat-proof 4" squares. I used stainless hose clamps to hold the fabric sections to the frame. 3.5" vinyl vertical blind slats woven into the roof and top of the side panels provide sun & wind protection. Not pictured is a panel I cut of the same fabric that can be suspended from the top as a divider using carabiners or similar.

Here are a couple of pictures. One of my grandson helping me "test" the door swing :), and one holding a few goats headed for a new paddock.

View attachment 126561 View attachment 126562
I like that a lot. Really cool. Looks easy to handle and load/unload. I see that it does the job well also. My cage fits in the 4 wheeler trailer which was custom made. 3,500 lbs axile with expanded metal sides and bed welded to angle iron frame. The trailer is 5 ft long and 4 ft wide. Lots of times I just hook up to the lowboy trailer with the truck and hook the wheeler to the wheeler trailer and load the cage into it, then drive the wheeler out to the goat pen and load up there with the goats and run the wheeler and trailer up on the lowboy trailer and drive where ever I need to go. It is sure nice to unload a billy that is not so tame and doesn't lead well, straight into a pen and or load from a pen. I am not into fighting with a goat that doesn't lead good. Just load him or her up on the spot and drive away. Goat people are some of the most ingenious open minded folks you will find. If there is a will then they will find a way.
 

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We usually use an extra large dog crate ratchet strapped down.

When we first started with goats a few years ago and before we had a truck or mini van we had an old Toyota Corolla. Guess how many full sized goats fit in the trunk of a Corolla? Three. Ask me how I know! ;)
 
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