How do you walk a goat with a collar?

Discussion in 'Pack Goat Training' started by CaramelKittey, Jan 16, 2020.

  1. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Alright, alright. I know this sounds like a really silly question but I have a really REALLY silly doe.
    Gracie is a Nigerian Dwarf doe who has never had kids. We are planning to breed her really soon. Is it true that they calm down once they have kids?
    Soo..she is incredibly stubborn whenever I grab her collar. She jerks a bit until she leans her head on the ground and lays on her knees. I’ll gently pull her up, and she either stands her ground, or just takes off! We don’t live near any roads, streets, or loud cars that may scare her. What’s her problem?
    The weird thing is, she is pretty good walker in a goat show. When she wants to be. She is good at following other goats, but is pretty awful when she is in front. I always try to get her somewhere in the middle when she is shown, as she does best there. Her other weird habit, is that she is fantastic the first class she goes into, (which is usually showmanship, so I’m always glad she walks then!) but declines over time. She hates having her hooves trimmed on a stand with food, but she would gladly stand on the floor with no food and let me trim her hooves or shave her! I don’t remember dropping her as a kid, but it sure looks like it! To make it stranger, She was a bottle baby too. Soo..why doesn’t she walk?
    Thanks in advance for any advice you have! Sorry for the length.
     
  2. elvis&oliver

    elvis&oliver Well-Known Member

    828
    Jun 27, 2018
    Pa
    Others who are a lot more educated will leave better advice for you I’m sure:)
    When I started to train mine to follow me with a collar and leash and also without, I carried a plastic container with raisins. They knew what it was and at the end of the walk I gave them a little handful. I started out with small walks then gradually built up to long ones. I would shake the container gently in front of me as I walked forward with pressure on the leash when they wanted to stop or lay down, for mine it encouraged them to simply follow me. Only because I had the raisins and I wouldn’t give them any until we walked back into their enclosure and I took the collars off. The container was small enough to tuck into my jacket as well which made them curious enough to follow. They never jumped on me to try and find it but I wouldn’t have let them I kept moving forward. Again I’m sure an expert will give you much better advice but it worked for my 2 boys. They’ve never showed so I’m not educated on that but now I don’t carry anything and we walk daily all over our 30 acres without any issues :) Good luck!
     

  3. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    I hate to say this but Clyde is a better leash goat then Bonnie. Ive had Clyde on a collar and leash since he was about 10 months old. He still rares back and tries to stop sometimes, but for the most part he will amble around. I do use treats occasionally to keep his attention.
    Bonnie is a pygmy. She will lock down all four hooves and try to look all bad. I just tug her along, tell easy lets go and she will walk along. Time and practice :)
     
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  4. spidy1

    spidy1 Well-Known Member

    she is way two spoiled, for training (some Boer shows use them) I use prong collars, not rough be gentil, but strict, if they fight stand there and let them fight with it, after a bit it will stop, if they stop or lay down, pull them on dont stop with them, a quick flick on the leash also helps
     

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  5. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    @elvis&oliver
    @MadCatX @spidy1
    Thanks for all the helpful advice!! I will definitely try the raisin thing. Do you think it might work with bits of apple slices as well? I have read that it is good to use treats when walking however, my goats usually get overexcited and jumpy. I just push them down and tell them no. (I Always teach them what ‘no’ means as kids. They usually listen. :rolleyes:)

    I’ll definitely look into the prong collars. I used to be incredibly strict with the kids however I must have down something wrong because Gracie (She is the most temperamental goat I’ve ever had.:devil:) had a phase where she would run away when she saw me. She is gradually regaining my trust.

    Thanks for all the advice! I’ll definitely try training her (And future kids) using your methods!
    Thank you! :goatrun:
     
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  6. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    Well lol now goats are stubborn as all get out. LOL Like yesterday a very rutty Clyde got his butt tore up for not listening. Which sounds bad but he just stood there blubbering at me like he was into it. lol But yeah the apple slices are great mine LOVE apples. so any treat like that works. Bonnie loves kiwis...lol wierdest thing ever..so i go to the store, when they reduce them and buy them up for goat treats. gives them vitamins sugars and such and they enjoy it.
     
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  7. spidy1

    spidy1 Well-Known Member

    I use apples and alfalfa pellets for treats
     
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  8. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    @MadCatX
    @spidy1
    Thanks you! We don’t have alfalfa pellets, but we do have kiwis and apple slices! Today, is WAY to cold, but when it’s warm, I’ll be doing lots of training! Any tips on convincing the goats that the treats are good? My doe Gracie is a picky eater!
    Thanks again!
     
  9. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    Bonnie is a picky girl to when in doubt buy Great value tortilla chips the circle kind, mine tear those up and the hint of lime kind ;)
     
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  10. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  11. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Lol. We always get the triangles, but if we need to, we can get the circles. Personally, the hint of lime disgusts me! :hide: I’ll never understand how a goat could like hint of lime but, they do eat grass and bark!
    Thanks for the info!
     
  12. Lindan

    Lindan Well-Known Member

    179
    Aug 19, 2018
    :omg:those are straight up illegal in this country:omg:

    A normal dog collar & leash and some apple slices and alot of patience works well here.
     
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  13. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    LOL - Clyde has felt the lash a few times. Like I said it seems to excite him. But now, when i grasp the leash he stands still and then will put his head on my leg. Ill tell him hes a good boy and explain what he did wrong.

    LOL and thes guys were eating pickle flavors chips they love the tart and tangy.
     
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  14. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    @spidy1
    I’ve been doing a lot of research into the prong collars and although they look scary, I see now that they are a lot better than the common choker chain. I honestly feel kinda bad for using a flat chain on my goat because it can damage his/her windpipe. If I am not allowed to use a prong collar in the ring, I will just have to train my goats with the prong collar until they are well behaved enough that I can safely use the flat chain. Thank you!
     
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  15. spidy1

    spidy1 Well-Known Member

    This is exactly right, I WONT use a choke chain on ANYTHING, I even have a tiny prong for kids, just starting out even flat leather colors can hurt them but the prong does not, the best way I have found to explain it to the not heads that think they are cruel, is put a choke chain and a prong color around each arm and pull, imagining where there wind pipe is, the choke chain cuts off the wind pipe and damages it, the prong slips around it and never hurts it or cuts off air
     
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  16. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    Exactly! In dairy goat shows, the does must be shaved. Do you think the prong collar could possibly hurt the doe at all when her fur is shaved? I’m sure it is still much better than a flat chain though. I am not to worried about a shaved doe and a prong collar though. After all, they do ram into each other at random times ‘for fun’ :rolleyes: But, the goats don’t ram into each other’s wind pipe. They are smarter than that! :)
    Thank you!
     
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  17. Lindan

    Lindan Well-Known Member

    179
    Aug 19, 2018
    Maybe use neither?
    We use normal non choke, non prong, wide-ish nylon dog collars, we have only horned goats.
    we don't use any whips/chains/electric prods, just a spray bottle with water, patience and treats.
    It works with both bucks and does.
    When a buck gets out of line, we grab the opposite legs of where we're standing, flip em on their back, and stand over them until they calm down, then we let them up and pet them, then continue with what we are doing.
    Both does and bucks will follow like puppies with enough training.
    Just because goats can be brutal to each other doesn't give humans a free pass to use the same methods... That's what we have our smarts for:clever:
     
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  18. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    Mine are standard dog collars
     
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  19. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    @Lindan @MadCatX Thank you for the tips! We have been using regular dog collars and we will always use them whenever we have to grab them and lead them somewhere fast. I’m more interesting in using the prong collars for training purposes. Don’t worry, I won’t be using any shock collars or any harmful learning methods! Goats have thick enough skin so I’m not worried about the prong collars damaging them.
    The spray bottle is a great idea! We used to use spray bottles to discourage kids from nibbling, but we will start using them for training too!
     
  20. MadCatX

    MadCatX Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2018
    GA
    Oh Clydius d Goat got introduced to the electric fence haha. I trained him with the dog collar. Hes slow learning but hes getting there. Hes a good boy with a good personality.
     
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