How long does it take for the teat orifices to seal themselves after milking?

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by Feira426, Aug 31, 2020.

  1. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    280
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    I’m sure there must be a post or a comment somewhere on this site that mentions this, but it’s not the easiest thing to find with a search engine. Lol

    I saw an old post by an inactive member that said you can feed hay right after milking and that will keep the does standing long enough for their teats to seal back up. Just curious if anyone knows how long it takes?
     
  2. NDinKY

    NDinKY Well-Known Member

    645
    Aug 3, 2019
    Kentucky
    No idea on that. We spray with Fight Bac right after milking. I assume the cold spray helps the orafices close up but haven’t thought too much about it. No problems with mastitis so far.
     
    Feira426 likes this.

  3. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Why the concern? Keep in mind that nursing kids open up the teat orifice.
     
    Iluvlilly! and Feira426 like this.
  4. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    280
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    A week or so ago I thought my doe had mastitis. She tested negative but I looked at a lot of mastitis stuff while I was researching and saw people suggesting the use of a sealing teat dip post milking to prevent nasties from getting into the udder while the orifices are open.

    Then I saw someone saying that if you can get them to not lie down for a little while after milking, you don’t need to seal the teats. I was just wondering how long it takes. Just curious.
     
    Iluvlilly! likes this.
  5. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Do you use Fight Bac or another antibacterial type dip or spray after milking?
     
  6. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    When the kids nurse, they have something in the saliva that helps prevent bacteria from entering the teat oriface after they nurse. The teat closes about 10-15 min after milking. Fight Bac is cold and does help close the teat, but the spray itself puts a thin coating over the end and that helps keep germs out. Iodine dip repels the germs. Most goats eat hay or whatever after milking, so the teat will close naturally.
     
    toth boer goats and Feira426 like this.
  7. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    280
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    Not currently. I didn’t really understand what they were for until very recently, so this is sort of my research phase I guess.
     
  8. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    280
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    I saw something yesterday about kid saliva doing that. That’s pretty amazing!

    I’m basically trying to decide if I think I need to start using a teat dip, or if keeping my does standing for a short time after milking will be satisfactory.
     
  9. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    I would think your does would naturally keep standing. I know mine do.
     
  10. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    280
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    They usually do. I was just thinking of waiting to feed my hay until after milking, just to insure they don’t go immediately lie down in the shade or something.
     
  11. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  12. Ranger1

    Ranger1 Well-Known Member

    Sep 1, 2014
    You still should use some kind of disinfectant after milking. Laying down puts the teats directly in the dirt and manure, but the doe kicking her teats, dust rising onto the teats, a crawling fly, etc. also give bacteria plenty of opportunity to get into the open orifice.
     
  13. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    Absolutely dip or spray teats with an antibacterial. I love fight bac - it's easy and economical. Preventative care is much better than hoping nothing gets up in that orifice and causing mastitis. I've been told 30 minutes for the teat to seal - however some take longer if they have a very large orifice.
     
    Feira426 likes this.
  14. Feira426

    Feira426 Well-Known Member

    280
    Dec 11, 2019
    Texas
    Got it. Thanks everyone! You’re all so full of good info!
     
  15. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California