How long was the longest you have milked a doe?

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by MadHouse, Jul 10, 2020.

  1. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    We have been milking Willow since May 2019 and figured it was time to breed her this coming winter. She has been giving a constant amount of milk that is just right for us. We are wondering how long she would keep on producing if we don’t breed her this year. I know it’s impossible to know, but maybe there are some signs I could watch for, if anyone has observed a pattern. Obviously if she drops in production that would be a sign. We have until November to decide.
    Thanks for any input.
     
  2. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    Milk production drop would be a sure sign. If you breed her in Nov. she would milk until Feb. then you would want to dry her off to prep for the new baby. That would be a 21 month lactation. That is really good! We breed every year. So, I've never intentionally milked anyone longer than a year.
     
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  3. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    The longest I have gone is 3 years but mine could have gone longer. There are goats out there that have milked for years. If you really don't want kids, just keep milking her. If she shows obvious signs of slowing down, then breed her.
     
  4. Driver

    Driver Member

    64
    Nov 11, 2019
    Western Washington
    Glad I stumbled on this I thought you had to bred every year. Whats the average time before you'll need to breed again to keep in good milk? We only need 3/4 gallon weekly 2 does.
     
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  5. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    That is individual to the goat. Most people breed every year. So you have to figure out how long each goat will stay in milk.
     
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  6. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Thanks
    I will see how the production is until November and decide then.
    Willow is not a heavy milker, and I’m wondering if her slow and steady “wins the race”.
    We have had 2 birthings here so far, all boys. It is a bit hard on the heart, because we can’t keep them all.
     
  7. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    I learned at a farm where one doe hadn’t been bred for 4 years and came back into milk in the spring. She was over 10 years old. That’s how I knew it is possible.
     
  8. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    When milking a goat through there will be slow in production at some point then when kidding season arrives many creep production back up. Our Saanen has been in milk since Feb 22 2019, so nearly 17 months. She is a half gallon milker and dropped to a quart.. she is back up to half gallon since the other kidded. Every goat is different, we plan on keep milking ours through unless something changes.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2020
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  9. MadHouse

    MadHouse Well-Known Member

    Is this your first goat that you are milking through?
     
  10. happybleats

    happybleats Well-Known Member

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Yes. I should have tried this a long time ago lol.
     
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  11. CaramelKittey

    CaramelKittey Well-Known Member

    We breed every year because we want the kids, and the milk. :)
    We usually breed in late October---early November, giving us kids in March. Last year we had kids in February, and haven't decided if we want to do it again. We usually milk from April to November and stop when we lease a buck. Currently we only have three does, but we are considering breeding one of them later so we can have at least one doe in milk year round. ;)
    I'm glad to hear Willow is doing well. :)
     
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