The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Shady Acre Homestead
Joined
·
14,283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering how old is the best to process if you have dairy crosses. Mine are part kinder, part pygmy/fainter. They are only 8 weeks old right now but I am trying to plan ahead for butcher dates.

Is there something I should look for to know they are "ready"? I would like the meat to be tender but would also like to get as much as possible.

Thanks for helping a newbie :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,606 Posts
I know at the sale where most goats go to butcher 60lbs is the best. I know with the fairs here the wethers have to be under a year old so that might be because thats the best time the meat will be. If you dont need to know that much in advance i would do it just when they look like they would be tasty :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,606 Posts
I have not butchered a goat, but with beef what we do usually is around 60 days before we plan to butcher we pour the grain to them, and let me tell you YUMMMM. I think 7-8 months would be good, they are not 100% at full size but very close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I've done over a year wethered or intact with nothing but good results. I'm going to do a 2 year old intact male in the end of spring for ground. I think more importantly than the age if you stay under 2 are a few other things. Try and butcher after spring when the grass starts dying. All the green grass might help with flavor. Mainly when you butcher use multiple knives (2-3) and keep your operation clean and in a cool area. Butcher with purpose and get the quarters on ice and cool ASAP. Should be great. I know most like younger. This works for us as we don't really grain so time puts meat on the bone for us.
 

·
Shady Acre Homestead
Joined
·
14,283 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have not butchered a goat, but with beef what we do usually is around 60 days before we plan to butcher we pour the grain to them, and let me tell you YUMMMM. I think 7-8 months would be good, they are not 100% at full size but very close.
That's what i'm hoping...I don't want to over winter them and I have limited space so i need to make room each year for babies for the 8 months...
 

·
Member with a bahhh
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
I did my dairy boys at 6-7 months. They were still on milk, alfalfa hay, no grain and even though they looked kinda thin compared to meat goats standards they were covered in fat.
 

·
Member with a bahhh
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
Xymenah~ How much meat did you get? And what cuts do you suggest?
I couldn't tell you how much meat but I'd guess we got around 35lbs including bone per goat. We never weighed them on a scale but I think they were around 80lbs live weight but most of them was a full rumen. We just separated the legs, split the ribs and removed the neck back. A leg curled up fit in our normal baking pot so we didn't bother doing cuts. We were novices though so we didn't want to ruin it by trying to make precise cuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
We feed ours just a little alfalfa at night as a snack. They pasture all day and if the pastures start getting thin we give a generous amount of oat hay or forage. We also feed them a mix of alfalfa pellets, black oil sunflower seeds, a little rolled barley, and a little purina goat chow in the morning. We just mix it all up and give them a little. We keep loose manna pro minerals, and baking soda on hand. We also give them lots of oak limbs, vegetables from the garden(when pulling for the new season or over ripe), and other tasty treats. As for cuts, I still need to learn. I don't know my cuts yet. I usually will make the hind quarters roasts or steaks, butterfly the backstraps(filet) and loin into medallions. The neck, front shoulders, rib meat, and any other meat I can pull of the bone goes to ground. Vacuum seal and it can last 2-3 years and taste like day one if its still sealed.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top