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Kinder Goat Breeder
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Well I've been reading a lot of posts recently that have shown me just how typically inept veterinarians tend to be about treating goats. What are the questions I should ask to weed out the pretenders?
 

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Well I think the biggest issue is there isn’t enough Goats out there for any vet to be totally 100% goat worthy. You have your dog vets and horse and cattle because they have enough clients to devote to those.
I think just flat out ask them if they know anything about Goats. If you get well no but I have cows or sheep (whatever) then chances are you may run into a few issues, not always though! Even then the best vet I had was one
That flat out said I know nothing about Goats and I even killed one once! He knew he didn’t know anything and he looked up everything before he did anything. He also listened to me! The worst vet I ever had was one that said he worked on Goats all the time and when I told him Goats were sensitive to sedation he told me no not really, and yeah he killed my goat.
What I would do (and still do when I take a chance on a vet) is do my own research. If they say it’s this or I’m gonna do that look into it yourself. I trust people on here WAY more then any vet because they deal with these animals 24/7 not here and there
 

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Unfortunately, now you have to have a vet / client relationship in order to get any prescription meds at all. So, once a year I have to have a vet come out, look at my herd and say "yep, you have goats", charge me $170, then I can tell him what I need and hope he will sell it to me. (Most is off label, so he can get really strict if he wants). And I usually tell him what is wrong, he is a horse vet, but the only one to make farm calls.

The best vet is one that will listen to the goat owner and not assume goats are 2nd class citizens of the livestock world. Good luck in your search!
 

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I’ve had two cow vets kill 2 goats. My best advice would be a horse or dog vet. They know they don’t know how to treat a goat, so they look it up. The ones who treat other ruminants treat goats the same and that ends up with a dead goat.
I’ve had the best luck with a deer vet, if you can find one local
 

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First, make a few phone calls and make sure to find out which vets will even look at goats. Try to get a feel for their attitude on the phone. Do they sound happy to treat goats, or do they sound like they'll do it if they have to but goats are beneath them? Even if a vet doesn't have much experience with goats, if he cares about your animals he'll take the time to educate himself when a problem arises. Know-it-all vets are not only annoying, they are dangerous to your animals' health. I've been fortunate to mostly get good vets who care about my animals even if they don't know much about goats and who will listen to me if they aren't sure what's going on.

Ask whether a vet will make farm calls or if you have to bring your goats to the clinic. I prefer vets who do farm calls but where I live that's not always an option. Ask how much they charge. If they are outrageously expensive, it may be a sign that this vet doesn't want to deal with goats and/or doesn't have time for new clients. The most popular vet in your area is probably popular for a reason, but he may not be readily available if you have an emergency so try to have another option.

The first time you have to see the vet, try to get a feel for him. Is he concerned? Does he take enough time to make a proper diagnosis? Does he ask you questions? Does he answer questions without acting offended or dismissive? Does he give precise and detailed answers to your questions? Is he willing to admit when he's not sure about something and needs to do some research? Will he take the time to do that research? Does he truly want to see your animal get well? Does he care about your budget? I knew one vet who seemed offended if we didn't opt for the most expensive and exhaustive treatment available on the first try. I don't want a vet who shames me for not spending enough money on my animals.

On the other end of the spectrum, there's a vet I work with who generally seems to think it's better to put a goat down if we have to spend more than $100 on treatments. However, he's a very capable and experienced vet who came to respect how I value my animals once he saw what type of goat breeding we do. Now that he's no longer dismissive, he's my preferred go-to vet for prescriptions and advice on things like mastitis. He's very good at keeping his clients' budget in mind, but now that he knows I'm willing to spend money on my goats, he makes me aware of the more expensive options available and tells me whether he thinks they'll be better than the cheap option. Sometimes you have to work with a vet a few times for them to get a feel for you too.
 

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I know I’m guilty of not seeing a vet until an emergency, but you should spend the money and try to have the vet meet your animals when everything is fine, maybe for shots or just a well check. That way they can start to get a baseline idea on the animals, and you
 
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