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he still doesn't like it, he's barely liking his feed. I'm not sure if he'll ever like the supplement. did u ever get any tips from your friend about the supplement?
No unfortunately I haven't heard back from the one I asked, I will ask again, I know they've been super busy (teacher/end of school year craze).
I'm sorry he is not eating well, especially his grain. Have you made sure he is not wormy? I know that can be an indicator of worms when they are not eating well. if not, you might look into giving him some oral B-Complex and probiotics for a few days to see if that helps with his appetite. If weather is hot or yucky that can play a part in appetite/consumption.
You might also look into Vitacharge Liquid Boost, I've used it under stress in the past and the goats did well. It kept my son's buck eating through hotter days and at shows.
I wish I had more advice to offer, unfortunately, it's tough to know how these critters will react to different supplements or feeds. I never expected the bucks to love their power fuel so much. They wouldn't be getting it if they didn't need a little more cover on them.

Kelp is eaten more by the goats who need it. You should take the fact that some don't like it as a good thing.
I really think a majority of them are not wanting it. I don't add much at all to their feed. I figure if there is something left in the bottom of the feeder, then someone must like it because it's gone by the next time I go out to feed lol.
 

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Mine eat kelp like candy.lol I tried free choice, and they ate 25 lbs in a week. No more free choice kelp. This was along side of cargil onyx, cobalt block and weekly replamin plus gel.
 

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Never add kelp to feed. Goats should eat as much they feel is necessary.


Of course, with money issues, it is a hard hit on the budget because some will eat the whole bag. I fill the feeder at a specific rate daily, a rate I can afford. It is up to my goats at that point how much they wish to eat. I do not believe in adding any sort of mineral supplement to feed.

Mine used to go gaga for kelp, then switched to filtered water instead of the well and they eat it at the same rate of loose minerals. A lick now and then.
 

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Kelp is high in iodine. Since iodine is categorised as a trace mineral, there is a risk of receiving/ingesting excessive amounts. Iodine levels are used and processed as a type of regulator for thyroid function. Inadequate amounts of circulating iodine leads to hypothyroidism, too much excess leads to hyperthyroidism. In moderation, kelp can be a healthy supplement. In excess, the iodine levels can alter the endocrine functions of the thyroid gland over time. Goats have thyroid function just like other mammals.
 

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Kelp is high in iodine. Since iodine is categorised as a trace mineral, there is a risk of receiving/ingesting excessive amounts. Iodine levels are used and processed as a type of regulator for thyroid function. Inadequate amounts of circulating iodine leads to hypothyroidism, too much excess leads to hyperthyroidism. In moderation, kelp can be a healthy supplement. In excess, the iodine levels can alter the endocrine functions of the thyroid gland over time. Goats have thyroid function just like other mammals.
Which is why it should not be given as a feed additive. Self regulation is the safest form of feed. Goats will eat the kelp they need, and they do know when to stop based on their needs just the same as loose minerals. In excess our loose minerals could do more harm than good as well. But we do have to trust our goats, to a certain point. Kelp is quite a safe form of iodine.
 

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Which is why it should not be given as a feed additive. Self regulation is the safest form of feed.
Good point. This is also why goats need a separate salt lick apart from the minerals. Forcing the goats to get all salt from the mineral mix can lead to mineral toxicities, as the goats ingest too much trying to get enough salt.

Kelp is not a grain, @Dwarf Dad, and they won't eat it to excess like they will grain. It can be really expensive to offer at first, but they will reach satiety. Perhaps offer more and more until they reach a happy balance with you?
 
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I guess I could try again, as I have swapped 1/2 of the alfalfa pellets out for pelletized feed. Good idea.
 

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Never add kelp to feed. Goats should eat as much they feel is necessary.

Of course, with money issues, it is a hard hit on the budget because some will eat the whole bag. I fill the feeder at a specific rate daily, a rate I can afford. It is up to my goats at that point how much they wish to eat. I do not believe in adding any sort of mineral supplement to feed.

Mine used to go gaga for kelp, then switched to filtered water instead of the well and they eat it at the same rate of loose minerals. A lick now and then.
I agree, you don't add anything like loose minerals or kelp or anything of that sort to feed unless it's in small amounts to a pelleted feed - it will fall to the bottom of the feeder and if they want it they will eat it, if not they won't. I just have a small container of Kelp that was given to us, if I can get enough of them eating it/liking it then I'll consider trying to find bigger container/bag of it.
 

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I agree, you don't add anything like loose minerals or kelp or anything of that sort to feed unless it's in small amounts to a pelleted feed - it will fall to the bottom of the feeder and if they want it they will eat it, if not they won't. I just have a small container of Kelp that was given to us, if I can get enough of them eating it/liking it then I'll consider trying to find bigger container/bag of it.
Again, the ones that need it will like it - the ones that don't will not. If your goats don't all love it, you are doing something right.
 

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Ive gotten lucky it seems. Bonnie is pretty good, but Clyde is a dumpster. He will eat most anything. Ive heard Molasses will trick most goats into eating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
No unfortunately I haven't heard back from the one I asked, I will ask again, I know they've been super busy (teacher/end of school year craze).
I'm sorry he is not eating well, especially his grain. Have you made sure he is not wormy? I know that can be an indicator of worms when they are not eating well. if not, you might look into giving him some oral B-Complex and probiotics for a few days to see if that helps with his appetite. If weather is hot or yucky that can play a part in appetite/consumption.
You might also look into Vitacharge Liquid Boost, I've used it under stress in the past and the goats did well. It kept my son's buck eating through hotter days and at shows.
I wish I had more advice to offer, unfortunately, it's tough to know how these critters will react to different supplements or feeds. I never expected the bucks to love their power fuel so much. They wouldn't be getting it if they didn't need a little more cover on them.

I really think a majority of them are not wanting it. I don't add much at all to their feed. I figure if there is something left in the bottom of the feeder, then someone must like it because it's gone by the next time I go out to feed lol.
He doesn't have worms, I've been checking his eyelids and stool everyday and they are perfect. He just doesn't like his feed but this is the third feed I've tried and I don't know what to do. He would be a great show wether in terms of muscle if he would only gain some weight. I'm not sure how to get him to eat anything anymore. All I know is that he does eat sweet gum leaves, so if anybody has a trick or tip with sweet gum leaves, leave it below please. Thanks- Emily 6-6-19
 

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He doesn't have worms, I've been checking his eyelids and stool everyday and they are perfect. He just doesn't like his feed but this is the third feed I've tried and I don't know what to do. He would be a great show wether in terms of muscle if he would only gain some weight. I'm not sure how to get him to eat anything anymore. All I know is that he does eat sweet gum leaves, so if anybody has a trick or tip with sweet gum leaves, leave it below please. Thanks- Emily 6-6-19
Eyelids and the appearance of poop is not a fool-proof nor comprehensive way to tell if parasites are present. I would proceed with a fecal test for worms and cocci.
 

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@NigerianDwarfOwner707 This is what I've read...
So show season is coming up in Texas and i've got my wether and hes doing well, learning to walk and brace but,.....please really need help he has to gain 23 pounds to make weight.
Apparently there is a weight issue in order to qualify for the show ring. Time is running out.

Emily, I'd consider trying a different supplement at this point, such as cottonseed, or Calf Manna? Mine really like cottonseed hulls. Maybe it would help your guy?
 

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@NigerianDwarfOwner707 This is what I've read...

Apparently there is a weight issue in order to qualify for the show ring. Time is running out.

Emily, I'd consider trying a different supplement at this point, such as cottonseed, or Calf Manna? Mine really like cottonseed hulls. Maybe it would help your guy?
I agree. I am not familiar with this supplement.

What is the goats' current diet?
 

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I've not used the Purina High Octane Champion Drive, but my wether friends have. The ones I've spoke with had no issues getting their goats to eat it after a few days.
We use Power Fuel to try and get some cover on our breeding goats, and keep some cover on young goats that are being weaned (since we started weaning a few weeks before show season).

Here is a chart that sort of explains how some of the supplements work - unfortunately every chart I've ever found talks about cattle, but it works the same way with goats/sheep pretty much.



This is what E Roberts is trying to get their wether to eat:

http://pulse.sullivansupply.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/High-Octane-Champion-Drive-sell-sheet.jpg

This is what we use:
http://pulse.sullivansupply.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/High-Octane-Power-Fuel-sell-sheet.jpg

So they do 2 different things.
 
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