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We are starting our herd of Boer goats. We bought a registered buckling and we’ll be getting him around Mother’s Day. He’ll be around 10-12 weeks old. How have y’all handled your bucks? Do we need to spend time with him, avoid him, find a balance? I don’t want to have an aggressive, 300lb buck on my hands. Any advice is appreciated.
 

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Is he dam raised or bottle fed? Have you had a chance to observe the demeanor of his sire?

My advice is never play pushing games with him and never let him jump on you. He should move out of your way when you walk, a knee out of the way to let him know you are herd queen if he doesn't. He won't start testing you until age 2 or so usually. If a buck it going to become unmanageable, it's usually about age 3 as they come into full maturity and finish growing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is he dam raised or bottle fed? Have you had a chance to observe the demeanor of his sire?

My advice is never play pushing games with him and never let him jump on you. He should move out of your way when you walk, a knee out of the way to let him know you are herd queen if he doesn't. He won't start testing you until age 2 or so usually. If a buck it going to become unmanageable, it's usually about age 3 as they come into full maturity and finish growing.
He is dam raised. We don't know anything about his sire right now, other than pedigree, but I plan on asking when we pick him up. Thank you for the input!
 

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I prefer to keep our bucks on the less friendly side. When I walk into their pen, I don’t want them under my feet for safety reasons. They can be friendly, but they can’t think I’m their equal, and they aren’t allowed to get head rubs here. It seems they’ll just assume we are scratching posts from that point on. I’m not about to be rubbed on by a 300lb+ buck. No thank you! Lol

Additionally, we do not tolerate aggressive bucks towards humans. If they attack anyone, their future is in our freezer.
 

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When we first moved to texas, we got into boer goats, and here is my experience with boer bucks. (we went through a horrible drought in 2011, and sold 50 goats, and 80 head of cattle, getting out of them)

YOU are in charge! Never let them think otherwise. My husband would feed them, and the kids were NEVER allowed to go in there with them. Now, it sounds a bit extreme, but hubby would have a baseball bat with him at all times when he was with the bucks, because we had one that we bought that was aggressive! He pinned the previous owner against the fence, and slashed his belly! He was fine, but still, scary. Hubby did have to hit him on the head pretty hard once because he charged him, but he learned his lesson. Never got close to us again, which was fine by us LOL! He never felt the hot shot, believe it or not! Never even phased him!
 

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Since you will be getting them when he is young, I would suggest you spend as much time as you can taking him on walks and making sure he knows that you are always in control. I have 2 Boer bucks. My little sister and I take them for a walk every evening. One is 3 years old and he is a perfect angel. The other one is just over a year and he has been having some behavior issues but he is coming around. I got them both when they were about 2 months old.
Don't ever let him think that playful behavior with you is acceptable because that is not cute when he is full grown. Good luck!
 

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Dont let him be blubbery over you, he sees you as his equal. The best buck out of rut can change once in rut and you may find yourself needing to go over the rules again.
Not letting them walk in front of you or cut you off goes with the does too.
Start all of this young.
 

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Do not let them do anything that you would not let them do once they are full grown. What is cute now can be deadly later. I do not want my bucks terrified of me but nor do I want them under my feet. They are expected to give way anytime one of us comes through, no exceptions. I* made the mistake of over handling my first one. At 3 he turned down right scary. Never again.
 

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I love reading these threads, they are so helpful. What does it mean when people say not to let a buck cross in front of you? What does it look like? Do they do it in close proximity or farther away? Do they look at you when they do it?

We have a mature buck, but he likes to keep to himself (which I appreciate). He’ll wearily walk over to me if coaxed, but just for a sniff and a treat. I like that he is this way. I don’t think I have ever seen him do this?
I’m currently looking to add another buck to grow our herd and I want to make sure I understand these things!
 

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I love reading these threads, they are so helpful. What does it mean when people say not to let a buck cross in front of you? What does it look like? Do they do it in close proximity or farther away? Do they look at you when they do it?

We have a mature buck, but he likes to keep to himself (which I appreciate). He'll wearily walk over to me if coaxed, but just for a sniff and a treat. I like that he is this way. I don't think I have ever seen him do this?
I'm currently looking to add another buck to grow our herd and I want to make sure I understand these things!
When I say it I mean purposefully trying to block my path. Similar to the way goats do each other. Watch your herd one day and you will notice that the higher their rank in the herd the less they move out of another goats way. You will see the lower ranked ones give way and walk around that goat instead of making it move. On the opposite side a goat with a higher rank typically does not walk around a lower rank goat. You may see a head tilt, a swipe with their head or in the case of our queen she makes the weirdest bugling sound and they get out of her way. When you give way you are acknowledging that they have a higher rank than you. Hence in the future if they are coming through to you and you do not move .. then they swipe a head at you they are simply observing herd mechanics. It's not always meanness. Don;t get me wrong there are truly rank bucks ( attitude wise) out there. The above mentioned mechanics is also why bottle babies tend to be more of a problem with getting rank. You are just another goat to them.
 
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