The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well you see, I plan on getting a new goat soon. I already have one goat, she's AWESOME But when I get home with my new member I'm not sure how to interduce them. (Well they will both be girls, so that may help)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,188 Posts
My preference is to let them out into a very open neutral area (a large fence pasture) and just let them work out the new herd hierarchy right away. But if it is very hot and taking them a long time of sparring to figure it out then I will separate to let them settle and try again later. Or distract them with food for a break.

I prefer not to share a fence line because I like to reduce damage to my fences and because I feel like the tension just builds up until they can get to each other and decide who is boss.

Choose a goat that also has horns if yours does, and don't choose a baby if you have an adult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My preference is to let them out into a very open neutral area (a large fence pasture) and just let them work out the new herd hierarchy right away. But if it is very hot and taking them a long time of sparring to figure it out then I will separate to let them settle and try again later. Or distract them with food for a break.

I prefer not to share a fence line because I like to reduce damage to my fences and because I feel like the tension just builds up until they can get to each other and decide who is boss.

Choose a goat that also has horns if yours does, and don't choose a baby if you have an adult.
Good idea!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
Old military horsemen in Sweden had some useful "ceremonies" when putting horses together. First ride them more and more close to one another, during several weeks, so they get used to seeing one another. When they already know about one another, ride them one day rather hard, so they get tired and hungry. Groom them, water them, and let them out on a nice grazing pasture. They will begin by rolling, and then haste to eat. When not as hungry as before, they start looking at one another, but it is sort of not so very NEW any longer.

In addition, it has been adviced to let a newcomer gradually get used to the microflora on the new place, and the general routines, persons, smells, sounds and so on. Only thereafter give her the challenge of getting a ranking place in her new flock. In your case, there is only one plus one, so it will probably go easy. If they choose to fight about ranking order, let them do so, but check that they do not damage one another, breaking someones leg between horns or such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
I agree with others, you will have some bickering as they establish a pecking order. I got my goats about a week and a half ago. It was two young adults. They seemed to mesh pretty well but I do still see some bickering over pecking order. They have a pretty big pasture. After a while the pecking order will be established and you still may see some bickering on occasion but it should calm down quite a bit :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Old military horsemen in Sweden had some useful "ceremonies" when putting horses together. First ride them more and more close to one another, during several weeks, so they get used to seeing one another. When they already know about one another, ride them one day rather hard, so they get tired and hungry. Groom them, water them, and let them out on a nice grazing pasture. They will begin by rolling, and then haste to eat. When not as hungry as before, they start looking at one another, but it is sort of not so very NEW any longer.

In addition, it has been adviced to let a newcomer gradually get used to the microflora on the new place, and the general routines, persons, smells, sounds and so on. Only thereafter give her the challenge of getting a ranking place in her new flock. In your case, there is only one plus one, so it will probably go easy. If they choose to fight about ranking order, let them do so, but check that they do not damage one another, breaking someones leg between horns or such.
Okay, that's helpful! Thanks for the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree with others, you will have some bickering as they establish a pecking order. I got my goats about a week and a half ago. It was two young adults. They seemed to mesh pretty well but I do still see some bickering over pecking order. They have a pretty big pasture. After a while the pecking order will be established and you still may see some bickering on occasion but it should calm down quite a bit :)
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,120 Posts
Among goats, girls generally fight harder than boys, though not so often. Boys often have a wrestling practice every day, while girls usually fight - or do fighting movements - only when it is serious.

Generally. :buttheads: When two individuals are equally strong and intelligent, a struggle about rank can be long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Among goats, girls generally fight harder than boys, though not so often. Boys often have a wrestling practice every day, while girls usually fight - or do fighting movements - only when it is serious.

Generally. :buttheads: When two individuals are equally strong and intelligent, a struggle about rank can be long.
Oh, Thant makes since. Thank you.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top