How to protect from night time predators?

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by grace4every1, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Hi,
    I was hoping to get some ideas on how other people protect against night time predators. We have a 4 foot non climbing goat fence and we have a barn for them that locks them in at night. My problem is what do we do when we're not home by dark to out them away. We have coyotes, foxes, etc. Is 4 foot high enough? Will installing an electric fence on the top and bottom of our 4 foot fence work? Will barb wire across the top work? I'm just wondering what works for other people before I invest in and trust something that doesn't work.
    Thanks,
     
  2. Kelly-Mae Clampett

    Kelly-Mae Clampett New Member

    13
    Jun 20, 2019
    Michigan
    I'd like to know the same thing! This is mine. Coyotes every night!
     

  3. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    As far as I know a log house is the very best. But of course it requires a human administrating it!

    Second best is probably an electric fence, but 4 feet - that is 120 cm, right? - is by far not enough, and I think the best would be a double one, preventing the predator to chose freely where to land after the jump.

    Also remember the flying predators, especially when there are newborns. Against them they say - I have not tried - that fishing lines can be effective, since these animals do not like to collide with something they cannot see.

    Others in here may inform you about guarding dogs, which I know exactly nothing about!
     
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  4. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Thank you. I think we are going to add another foot with 2 strands of barb wire and the electric fence. We have a LGD, unfortunately the goats and the dog are all 11 weeks old so he isn't ready to work yet.
     
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  5. NicoleV

    NicoleV Well-Known Member

    351
    Dec 11, 2015
    SF Bay Area, CA
    To protect against dogs or coyotes digging under the fence, you can put an apron of fence material on the outside of the fence either buried or just covered by a few inches of dirt/rocks so it's held down well. The animals always try to dig right at the bottom of the fence and hit the buried material. They can't figure out to back up a few feet to dig under the apron.
     
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  6. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Thank you. Yes, we have fencing buried 12" deep. I need to somehow keep them from jumping over the top.
     
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  7. NigerianNewbie

    NigerianNewbie Well-Known Member

    Jun 5, 2018
    Central NC
    Something to consider in advance. An adult goat could attempt a jump over a 4' or 5' high fence, they also stand on fencing to reach for what seems tasty to them slightly out of reach and overhead. Having barbed wire on the top could be a risk at a later date. I have seen the damage to livestock and deer caused by barbed wire fencing and it is not a pretty sight.
     
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  8. Drmike

    Drmike Well-Known Member

    117
    Jun 23, 2019
    Japan
    We have bears foxes and wild boars

    Only thing that stops them is electric fence. I have one powerful enough to really deter a full grown bear.

    Best way is to have earth and positive wires at fence top and wires a little outside the fence at ground level to stop digging and at animal eye height

    But best deterrent at night when I’m not around to lock them in is I built auto door closures for their house

    Just a timer and an actuator

    It’s programmed to close the door at dusk and open at dawn


    I’ve often seen foxes and raccoon dogs in the undergrowth outside the fence looking in depressed

    Foxes can jump over 6 feet tall fences with ease...
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
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  9. Drmike

    Drmike Well-Known Member

    117
    Jun 23, 2019
    Japan
    Google foxes fence jumping and you will quickly realize they can jump over any fence. You need electric wires at top of fence to shock them off and/or stand off fence to stop jumping. Put fence energizer on a timer so off during day if concerned about goats getting zapped
     
  10. Drmike

    Drmike Well-Known Member

    117
    Jun 23, 2019
    Japan
    Personally I’d prioritize the door auto closure way first myself
     
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  11. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    Hot fence is what I use. I have barbwire on top but it’s mostly for the cows lol foxes and coyotes are more go under and threw a fence not jump over. Bob cats and mountain lions (if you have them) usually will climb and jump. Usually with cats keeping trees away from the fence helps out a lot.
    But for my fence which honestly the biggest threat is dogs is I just have a single stand of hot fence about 12-18 inches off the ground on the outside. I also have it the same on the inside to keep goats off my fence but it does play as extra safety.
    Another thing you can use, and I do use this on my goats when I turn them out to free range. Wolf pee. Just make sure there are NO wolfs in your area. A lot of people use it to keep coyotes away. You can just spray around the fence line. I wasn’t totally sold on it but figured what would it hurt? I actually sprayed a squirt on a few goats as I let them out (no way to spray around 800 acres lol) and I actually saw a coyotes heading in the direction of the goats and stop, smell the air and went the other way. I THINK it also works for foxes but if you go to predatorpee.com they have a list of different “pests” and what kind of pee you want to get
     
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  12. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Thank you, this is very good info.
     
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  13. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Thank you, we have Bobcats too, I didn't even think about them! I'll look into the predatorpee site.
     
  14. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Thank you, I will definitely get my husband to YouTube and do that for for them.
     
  15. grace4every1

    grace4every1 New Member

    23
    May 1, 2019
    Franklin, TN
    Thank you, we are pretty sold on the hot wire and figuring out the auto close door.
     
  16. NicoleV

    NicoleV Well-Known Member

    351
    Dec 11, 2015
    SF Bay Area, CA
    That's interesting about wolf pee because wolves definitely hunt coyotes! That's why coyotes are so smart is to avoid the wolves, at least that what I've heard.
     
  17. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  18. Drmike

    Drmike Well-Known Member

    117
    Jun 23, 2019
    Japan
    Personally I like at least one hot and a ground wire next to it spaced about 6” apart and wires at an angle to the fence so that any animal that jumps on top the fence will touch both a live and ground wire. If only a hot wire it’s possible for animal to not get a shock
     
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  19. Trollmor

    Trollmor Well-Known Member

    Aug 19, 2011
    Goatless in Sweden
    An electric thread some 30 cm above the ground and a meter or so from the fence, on the outside? (Unless you get onto your neighbour's land! ;) )

    I agree, barbed wire is dangerous, for many reasons! Especially after 50 years, buried in the dirt, with a piece a dm from the ground, and a horse ... Or a human ... Or an innocent wild deer ... :eek:
    This seems to me to be the best advice so far!

    - How do you make sure the goats are inside when the door closes?
    How far from the fence?
    One of my friends went daily all around his patch, peeing himself, and making his dog pee. Watching tracks in the snow, he could see that the nearby wolf pair did sniff on the pee, and turn the other way. So I tried the same, being a woman I used a plastic bottle for my pee, spraying on "land marks", urging the dogs to do the same. But I do not know if this worked, never saw any evidence of predators there. - - Worth trying?
    I did, and found this:
    https://www.predatorpeestore.com/SnakeGuard.html
    but I can not see how to set the trap again, after having poured food oil on it. Can you?
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
  20. Jessica84

    Jessica84 Well-Known Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    California
    I use the longer insulators, I can’t find a tape measure at the moment so I’m going to say it’s about 6” from the fence.
    Human and dog pee might work. Probably depends on the coyotes and what they are used to. Here, as in where I’m at, I don’t think it would work. We border a subdivision and 90% of the coyotes diets around here are people’s pets and garbage. They will actually go onto people’s porches and snag small pets. They really are not all that fearful of humans. On my place they have a little more fear because I will not hesitate to shoot one that gets too close to my house. I’m in the middle of 800 acres, there is large ranches on the 3 other sides of me, they have no reason to come close to me and mine. But before I set up the goats pen basically all around my yard, they would come in all the time to get my chickens. They really don’t like anything that looks like a trap so they respect the fence. But on our other property we have about 30 minutes north I bet human and dog pee would work for them. Really never hurts to try it but I wouldn’t totally rely on it until proven otherwise.
    $30 for 1 snake trap! I don’t see how you would be able to use it again either and there is no way I would pay that much for one trap. That’s got to be for people that just happen to see a snake on their front step and they set that trap out instead of getting a shovel and either killing it or relocate it because they are scared. If you have issue with snakes look into something different. We have rattle snakes here and supposedly moth balls keep them away. I have found just a lot of movement keeps them away. Between the pigs, chickens, dogs, and other critters running around the yard it’s not very often they show up here. When we have drought years I have to keep a eye around the water troughs because they do come in looking for water and they will chance all the animals running around for it. But bottom line I would not pay $30 for a single trap