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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an 18 month Torg wether that after we go on our walks he does not want to be caught to go back in the pen. The goat pen is roughly a half acre with a child's play structure, tractor tire, stumps and even a soccer ball so it's not like he is going to jail. He has developed this habit over the past two months and after reading some posts I may have made the matter worse! I read Nanno said to not chase goats because they are prey animals. I have not chased him but I have just kept walking at him until he gets himself corned in a few spots on the property and then I make sudden movements to grab his collar. Is this behavior curable? I have one of my younger goats that seems to think he is pretty neat and sometimes won't listen or come so I can put him in the pen. Can anyone please advise me on a course of action.....even if its time to just cut bait and get another bottle baby. Oh we did not bottle feed this guy although he was bottle fed and out of the four we have he listens the least and we have bottle fed the others and they listen much better. Thanks far any advice.
 

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We have a Togg, Moose, he's 3.5yrs now and we have bottle raised him from a few weeks old. We've had our challenges with him, all things we expected and heard were normal Togg behavior. This is one of them I think. If you read John Mionczynski's book he even states he has to catch his Togg before all the other goats in order to keep him from running away to get saddled. Moose is very sweet, bonded, and has been awsome on all the hikes we've been on. He is so smart though, you couldn't catch him if you wanted to, or at least until he wanted to let you. If we go out just to say hello and play with the guys he comes running right up for scratches and stands next to us, follows like a champ. Now, if we go out with wormer, hidden so he can't see it, he takes off right away and seems to just know. We can never catch him when we want to, only when he allows us to, even with treats. We were very frustrated by this in the begining, but he is so smart and alert on the trail he is worth the extra effort. My husband doesn't like that he is so skitish, but loves how he hears or see's an animal way before anyone else (goat and human). I think they just have a lot more wild in them, but a lot of good instinct comes with that. Especially if you plan to use him to hunt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do plan on using them for hunting and that is the main reason I am worried about this begavior. How in the world would I catch him on the mountain if he turns out similar to yours and won't come to treats. I might end up leaving him there if I have to pack out a critter cuz I can't catch him. how are you making it in the woods if he is so smart and won't come to be saddled or loaded even with treats?
 

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I do plan on using them for hunting and that is the main reason I am worried about this begavior. How in the world would I catch him on the mountain if he turns out similar to yours and won't come to treats. I might end up leaving him there if I have to pack out a critter cuz I can't catch him. how are you making it in the woods if he is so smart and won't come to be saddled or loaded even with treats?
I've been reading this thread with interest and probably have little to offer. That said, I have an 11 month old Springer Spaniel female and we have a 1/2 acre lot next to several other open 1/2 acre lots. Different I know but maybe not completely.

We take our Springer up in the mountains and on hikes all the time as well as all my kids soccer and baseball games. However, she went through a phase (and still does once in a while with my wife & kids) where she doesn't always come to them when outside in OUR yard. Part of it is they are different than me in relationship. (Is your goat better with one of you over the other?) Next, it was a phase and getting upset just made it worse especially if you got upset when she came back...as tough as it is, need to always keep it positive. Finally, when we are out and about anywhere else...anywhere...true to her breed & being very bonded, I never ever have a problem in the field. The other poster reminds me of that & I wonder, outside of their comfort zone, if it will be a non-issue. Just a few ignorant thoughts...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well thank you all for the advice! Tonight's after walk went much better. The treats worked......I did have to find the right one though (tomato basil triscuts), I had know idea a certain treat would get that kind of reaction. He actually spit out a cheese puff, honey mustard pretzel and plain old regular salty chips. He also is much more compliant with my wife and she has been the one dealing with him lately...I was losing my patience so she took over. They have not hiked out of their comfort zone yet only on our property so I can hope that will help too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks TOU.....after seeing the reaction to triscuts I may just have to test him next week with a walk off the property to see how he does. I would this weekend but I am packing in for four days on my back cuz it's archery elk season here in Oregon. Still have two years before I will hopefully be using my goats to pack in.
 

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Finding exactly the right treat is the key to unlocking all sorts of good behavior from previously intractable critters! Unfortunately for Mr. Picky-Pants Cuzco, the "magic treat" was this particular type of horse cookie that was as hard as rocks. We had to use them for several years until he finally expanded his tastes. I think that's probably why his back teeth were all worn down to nubs by the time he was nine years old. Triscuits sound a lot safer!
 

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We don't have a problem with Moose on the trail, otherwise it would never work, it is only at home. It seems most behavior like this is a non issue when they're out of their comfort zone. If they're well bonded they look to you and follow your every move for the most part when away from home.
 
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