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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I first got into goats and was far into my research, I came across that some goats do not need to be bred each year and will stay in milk for lengthy amounts of time (like years). Is there a specific way to know if a goat will do this? (Besides the obvious way of just not breeding her). This was our first year breeding and milking goats and one of my girls had a TERRIBLE time kidding (babies began coming out head first - no feet:(:wallbang:). I am hopeful she is a goat who does not need to be bred again.....

Any way, if there are any clues, I would love to know!!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My girl is a full Oberhasli. Her mother was a very strong milker (though I'm not sure how much she continued producing throughout her lactation).

We weaned her son off her and her production spiked to 1/2 gallon each milking (1 gallon per day). She hasn't reduced to much...some days vary as she was not eating her full ration of grain (her choice).
 

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I would try her kidded out once more anyway. If she's a FF they usually don't do well with long lactations simply because their body doesn't know how to do it. It's all new and very stressful.

It sounds like you may have a promising girl on your hands if you indeed do wish to milk through.
 

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I would also breed her at least one more time. Older does seem to be the ones that will milk and milk and milk. Genetics plays a huge factor in if she will continue to milk, but most good dairy goats should continue to milk well even if they aren't bred. They might drop in the fall as their body naturally prepares for another pregnancy but then will pick up again in the spring.

Next time your doe is close to kidding, give her a shot of Bo-Se 2-3 weeks prior to kidding and make sure she has access to and is eating a good quality loose mineral (my 10 does will go through a 50 lb bag every 2 weeks when they are heavy bred). Almost all kidding difficulties when the kids are malpositioned can be associated with a mineral deficiency (usually selenium), or if they have 3 or more kids and they get tangled up.
 

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To know if a doe will milk thru you have to determine how much will to milk a goat has. In general Oberhaslis don't have a good will to milk but if she is still milking close to a gallon you may be able to milk her thru.

I have found that kidding is a much greater stress to the system of a doe than milking.

Also if you milk a doe thru then her lactations will be longer any time you freshen her.

However if the doe had a ton of problems kidding you may not want to keep any kids out of her anyway. Always choose your replacement animals from animals that are productive and don't give you a lot of problems.
 
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