Howdy from Tennessee

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by bee_pipes, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. bee_pipes

    bee_pipes New Member

    Howdy folks!

    My name is Pat. Me and my wife Karen are retired to Middle Tennessee. We have chickens, guineas, turkeys, honeybees and dogs. We're trying to reduce our dependence on the outside for food, and dairy is a real weak spot. We recently tried our hand at cheese with reasonable success (30 minute mozzarella) and I'm a milk drinker, my wife is not. We use milk for coking and both eat butter and cheese. Adding another variety of meat to our diet would be good too.

    The cheesemaking, no real bargain if you have to buy the milk, got me to thinking about dairy animals. I'm not up to wrestling with a cow or large goat. Sheep looked interesting because they are supposed to yield twice the amount of cheese for a goven quantity of milk, but I've been told there's a "wang" to the milk and it's not usually drunk as a beverage. Shame, I like lamb. Being a boy from the suburbs, there's a bad reputation for goat's milk where I come from. Seems to be just a predjudice and not really founded on fact. So, got me to thinking about goats. With just me and my wife, we don't need large quantites and I don't want to start a business - just milk to drink and cheese - butter and cream if possible. Read Storey's "Raising Dairy Goats" and figured it was time to start listening in on people raising goats for more practical information. Reading will only carry you so far.

    I was mopst interested in Nigerian Dwarfs - look small enough to be easily manageable. Space isn't too much of an issue, I have fencing and sheds to build before we can make a purchase. I'm a hopin' I can enclose part of the creek to keep them in fresh water.

    Thanks for the welcome.

    Regards,
    Pat & Karen
     
  2. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) New Member

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
    Waco, KY
    Shoo, got worried there for a second. It said no post existed when I tried to reply.

    WELCOME! There are a few here from Middle Tennessee and some of us are in surrounding states. Fencing is #1 thing when you have goats. What do you have in mind to use?
     

  3. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    howdy!! Glad to have you with us. I love Nigerians. Another meat/diary animal that is small is the Kinder. Which is a mix between the standared Nubian and a pygmy.

    ps. is there a way you can downsize your avatar just a tad?
     
  4. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Hello to you and your wife!

    I raise Nigerians in Washington and LOVE them. I did not want large goats either, so this was a perfect choice for me.

    I am planning on starting to milk mine when babies are born shortly so that I can make cheese and mabey butter. I love goat cheese.

    Kinders might be another good choice if you are wanting to use them for meat also. The dressage percentage for kinders is much higher. These guys are a little bigger then nigerians, but have high yeilds on birth, milk, and dressage.

    Hope this helps a bit! And welcome
     
  5. GSFarm

    GSFarm New Member

    312
    Oct 6, 2007
    Fairview, TN
    Welcome! Welcome!

    What part of M. TN? I'm just outside of Nashville and I raise and LOVE my Nigerians. They are great milkers and great pets!
     
  6. goathappy

    goathappy New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Illinois
    Welcome!! We have dairy goats and are on our way to having a farmstead cheese production here, so if you have any questions about dairying, feel free to ask! :D
     
  7. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    Welcome to The Goat Spot!!! I know nothing about Dairy goats..I am a meat goat breeder, but I do like the ND's too, they are cute!!
     
  8. bee_pipes

    bee_pipes New Member

    I was figuring on stretched wire - cattle fencing? - around their shed and as a pen. Electric for pasture - I have seen solar chargers out there, and that would work for a remote location. You tell me - that's why I'm hear, to hear it from the folks with hands on experience :greengrin:

    You got it! Didn't know it would do that...

    Backwoods Home Magazine did a piece about kinders. It's all going to boil down to what I can find locally. I know there are a number of NGD breeders in the vicinity.

    I don't know that I've read anywhere about butter from goat milk. Is that doable? Was afraid the difference in fat globules might make that difficult. What about cream separation?

    North of Linden, in Perry county, between the Buffalo and Tennessee rivers. Lived in Donalson when I first got out here, on the banks of Percy Priest, got married and moved to Columbia, then out here. Made that drive to Nashville for 3 months (yech!) and was lucky to get out before gas broke $2.50 a gallon.

    Thanks all for the warm welcome. I have had a lot of luck with forums like these on the internet. This seems to be no exception.

    Regards,
    Pat
     
  9. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    just want to thank you for downsizing your avatar - it looks great :D
     
  10. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Honestly, I am not sure about the butter - I just saw if when I was researching the cheese, and thought mabey I would try that at some point also :)
     
  11. fritzie

    fritzie New Member

    751
    Oct 6, 2007
    TENN
    welcome. yes you can make butter. you can preety nuch make what ever is made with cow's milk with goats milk. i love the taste of my alpine goats milk & have a few costomers that never had goats milk before & said that they could not tell the difference. i live in Waverly TN. it is near dickson & erin. if you are ever out this way stop by. i love to meet new goat people.
     
  12. eliya

    eliya New Member

    Yep, goat milk makes great butter, cheese, yogurt, ice cream...

    I started with the Nigerians when I began with goats. For the same reasons you did... I didn't want to wrestle a big goat, didn't need to much milk etc. Then I got a Nubian doe and began breeding MiniNubians (Nigerian/Nubian). I was hooked! The Nigerians were cute but the MiniNubians were cuter. I actually like the size of the MiniNubians better than the Nigies. Most of my does are about 24 inches tall. Most of them are also A LOT easier to milk than the most Nigerians. Their udders are a little higher off the ground and their teats tend to be larger. Also the MiniNubians weren't as bad of escape artists as the Nigerians. Those Nigies could get out of ANYTHING!!! The MiniNubians tend to have really high butterfat giving lots more cheese per pound of milk than some breeds.

    Anyway, I'm sure you will have fun with what ever goats you get. I just thought that you might like to hear my experience. You can see some MiniNubians on our website (see my signature).

    Have fun looking for the right goats for your family!
     
  13. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) New Member

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
    Waco, KY
    By stretched wire, do you mean woven wire? We use that on the perimeter, but still put one strand of electric on the inside as young goats can get their horns stuck. We use goat panels to divide up the barn (smaller openings than cattle panels), and use electric on the interior pastures. I do not recommend a solar panel. We tried that and had absolutely no luck. When/if you start to breed, you want to light up your buck if he tries to sneak back in with the does. As far as heights for the electric, start at 6" to keep small ones in. We did 6", 12", 18", 24", 36", and 48" at our other farm. But I think we only have 4 or 5 strands at this one. I'll check with Brad, my hubby. Make sure you get it grounded good. And get a fence tester to make sure all of it is working and to trouble shoot when it goes dead somewhere.
     
  14. bee_pipes

    bee_pipes New Member

    Figured this was getting a little more specific than a howdy, so I replied at:
    http://thegoatspot.freeforums.org/viewtopic.php?p=11757#11757

    And thanks everyone else. Enjoyed looking at your farms and goats. The mini nubians sound good - will have to see what the local breeders have. Registered and show quality are not a priority, food is. We pride ourselves on letting our livestock have the best life possible so that when it comes time to harvest we know they enjoyed life as much as they could and are not loaded up with hormones, pesticides, etc. We are fortunate not to have a bad predator problem. The chickens, duck and turkeys are locked up every night. The guineas have taken to the habit of roosting in the trees. We used to lock them up too, but the adults are getting too cantankerous to share their quarters with the rest of the poultry. We have lost one guinea and one turkey. The turkeys were roosting too until we lost that one, now they are locked down in the evening. Our old dogs have been trained not to molest the poultry, and I assume we'll have to repeat the process for goats. We got some new dogs and are going through the training process all over again.
    http://thegoatspot.freeforums.org/viewtopic.php?p=11812#11812

    - I'll be seeing you on the other threads - I got some reading here to catch up on...

    Regards,
    Pat
     
  15. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    Welcome to The Goat Spot!! Nice to have you here.