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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i do alot of **** hunting by myself i hunt with 2-3 hounds at a time and it makes it for a long night with gun lights and **** to carry i am thinkin of a getting a pack goat but have questions can goats see and do well at night as **** hunting is done in the dark my dogs have been around pygmy goats their whole life so the dogs wont mind the goat but it make it easier for me if a goat could carry the dead **** n rifle but i am lookin to only take one goat with me at a time if i train it good enuff will it follow and do what i want even tho other goats are not in the woods with us?
 

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I hike at night from time to time. They are more skittish at night. i don't know whether it is the dark alone that makes them nervous or if in fact there are other kritters out that make them nervous. On one hike they were particularly nervous.. turns out we were being followed by a moose.

The mountain lions may be more active at dusk.

Because of their nervousness, they tend to walk more underfoot than in the day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
that would be alright i really dont run and go fast when in the woods and in indiana our biggest predature is coyotes i really have never ran into anythang in the woods if i have to i can tie the goat to my belt any other ideas be appreciated
 

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I don't hunt with my goats but I do walk with them at night sometimes. They stick like glue. But- if you are going hunting right from your house and you take your one goat, and something scares him, he may try to run home. If you are going to put him in the truck and drive a ways to go hunting, and he was raised by you around your dogs and gone walking a lot with you and them, then he would probably stay right with you. He would probably think it was great fun as long as he got some treats.
 

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I've never hunted '***** before, but I doubt that a goat would be much good for night hunting. Mine really don't want to go out at night. It's either as others have said, that they are afraid of predators, or maybe they just don't see well at night. And even if you had a goat who didn't freak out in the dark, I wouldn't tie my rifle on him. He would probably drag it off going thru the brush and lose it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i no people use mules to help them **** hunting in the south so why it couldn;t be done with a goat as far as the goat getin scared and runin away why i said maybe i could tie em to my belt. as far as them not being very helpful at night why wouldnlt they be if i could find a pack that has a rifel holder or tie it up good and sure make it easier for a goat to carry my dead **** than me/ my opinion on it but would like to hear others expeirence with goats at night also?

also my next question is breed i want a breed that is not spooky or high strung and willing to work and less stubborn most people say any kind of breed of goat can and will pack any suggestions for mei myself love boar goats and pygmys i no pygmys can pack but cannot carry as much weight as a large breed but if im only wantin it to carry 2-5 ***** at 10 pounds each i think it could handle it? thanks to everyone with their replys im trien to learn as much as i can before i start this
 

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Most of the dairy breeds would work for what you want. Just make sure they are bottle raised or at least very friendly so they will follow along with you with out needing to lead them. I think your biggest obstacle using a packgoat for **** hunting will be crossing the fences. Riding Mules used in **** hunting are taught to jump fences by placing your hunting coat on the top wire so it looks solid to the mule. I guess a goat could be taught the same thing but i would make it a lot harder to keep them in at home. ;)

If you need to carry up to 50 lbs then you are looking at a goat that weighs about 200lbs. Pygmies are definitely out. I have found that my goats have great night vision and they are moving around camp eating even when it is pitch black. I was just in Ohio two days ago and went **** hunting. Funny coincidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the ifno i guess i kinda exagerated on the 50 pounds it be more like a rifel bullets maybe a extra light and the dead **** wich weigh 8-20 pounds each but i rarly get more than 3 a night when i walk bymyself and don take the pickup to get to other woods close i was actuly hopin more so a larger frame pygmy would work as they eat less wish costs me less and i really dont have the room for 2 dairy size breeds maybe one pygmy and one dairy size i could fit when i had pygmys before as i have been out of the goat buisness for years now and run chickens all my pygmys ran free on the farm so i guess i will start to reasherch dairy breeds and see if a pygmy could carry what i want maybe
 

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from wiki answers:

Goats (and most other animals with hoofs) have horizontal slits which are nearly rectangular when dilated. This gives goats vision covering 320 - 340 degrees; this means they can see virtually all around them without having to move (humans have vision covering 160 - 210 degrees). Consequently, animals with rectangular eyes can see better at night due to having larger pupils that can be closed more tightly during the day to restrict light. Interestingly, octopuses also have rectangular pupils.

But then I've never heard of anyone packing an octopus at night either.

Goats horns can actually make them go blind, negating the effect of the rectangular pupil.

Pig stuck his head in an empty bag of calf manna and couldn't get it off. He knocked over the BBQ grill, and didn't even think to just stop in his tracks.
 

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Goats can see just fine at night. They have huge expanding pupils like horses. We take our goat walking all the time at night and he has no trouble at all, even crossing cattle guards by balancing on the little support bars underneath that are practically impossible for a human to see at night. He sticks closer to us at night than in the day, but he's not nervous and he has no trouble avoiding obstacles in the path, walking on top of rock walls, or spotting a tasty weed ten yards away that looks higher than its neighbors.
 

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There are some folks here who have had bucks. I think they just neutered them. They probably had a good reason. Most will say that bucks have an odor that wethers don't have, and behavior can be more aggressive.

Horns or not is a personal choice. Those who remove horns cite safety reasons around novices and children. Those who don't just have cooler looking goats ;-)

The horns may help cool the animal, and may give it a bit of protection if it is on its own for any reason. Plus they can scratch their own butt.

You will find many posts in the archives on these subjects.
 
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