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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We live in South Florida, and apparently there's a hurricane that could potentially be on its way toward us. This got me thinking: what do I do with my animals? I doubt my boss thought about this when he purchased them, so now I 'm starting to panic. We don't really have any major concrete structures that would hold 22 goats and 8 alpacas, (which would be lovely since I was remembering stories of zoos putting their flamingos in the zoo restrooms during a storm). So is there any advice out there for what I should do with my babies for storms? Getting extra water troughs, building up their pens with dirt so they aren't flooded too bad, maybe reinforcing their shelter with extra wood? I'm clueless and freaking out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was going to ask our vet when he comes out on Monday. Other than that, we're one of the few "farms" around, most of our neighbors are residential without livestock.
 

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Make sure they have some sort of identification on them. . Best of luck to you.
Will be sending prayers and good thoughts that all is well and weather misses you all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you! It's looking like we will likely miss the majority of it, but I want to be prepared. Our area hasn't seen a true hurricane in 10 years, so I think people have forgotten how bad they can be.
 

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As a member of CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) I can assure you that in a disaster, there are many things you can do to ensure that your animals will be OK. Here are some links with tips that will help you prepare! By the way, the tip Goats Rock gave you is quite important. Make sure all your goats are tagged or tattooed and make sure you have that info with you if you have to take them elsewhere or if you have to evacuate and leave them behind. It will make it much easier for you to get them all back later.

http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/animal_rescue/tips/disaster_preparedness_for_livestock.html

http://emergencypreparedness.cce.cornell.edu/family/Documents/PDFs/Farmanimalprepare.pdf

http://hspca.convio.net/site/DocServer/Prepare_your_Horses__Farm_Animals_-_English_97.pdf?docID=1421
 

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stock up on water
and i've known people to spray paint their phone numbers on a horse large enough that it can be seen when you can't get near them
good luck
 

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If you can, take a a picture of yourself with each animal - this can help in getting them back afterwards. It never occurred to me, but a friend learned this tip.
 

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I just read an article on Facebook about what to do for your horses during times of natural disasters, many of the suggestion should also work on goats.

The first thing was to make sure you have an access to fresh waster if a disaster occurred. See if you can find a person/ business that has a building sturdy enough to keep supplies in.
Get enough grain for 2 weeks ready and keep it somewhere safe.

Make sure you have them somewhere that they can get away to.

Make sure you take pictures of the animals, write up documents including any health requirements for the goats in your state. On the documents record distinctive markings that can be used to identify them If needed.

They suggested to spray paint your number on the horses, you may be able to do this to the goats.

They had break away identification tags attached to the horses mane and tail, and legs.
Maybe you can do this to the goats?

Also gather up any supplies you can use to medicate the goats if needed.
 

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I've been through 3 hurricanes before, although this will be my first one with the goats.

If it strengthens to an actual hurricane we can make a small pen for the 5 of them in the quonset which is rated to withstand over 200 mph winds (yes, you know the wind bearing on your structures if you live in Florida). My only problem would be keeping one separate from the others because there is a good chance she'll be in heat. Honestly, she's made weight so I could just let nature take it's course. She weighs 54 lbs and her momma weighs 73 lbs, so that puts her at 74% which I think is okay to breed.

Our other regular preps are done. Generator works fine. I have a well and septic, so the generator will ensure my water supply and waste disposal. I'm just crossing my fingers that all fences withstand the winds because those repairs are expensive and necessary.

I honestly don't expect this to be that big of a deal. It's only slated to be a Tropical Storm and not a true hurricane. I live about smack in the middle of the state, so it will be even less when it gets to me. Once those things hit about a 2, then I get a bit worried and take many more precautions. Like our governor said, just keep informed and prepare as necessary.
 

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It sounds like rain may be your biggest threat. (according to the news in Ohio this eve)
Stay safe and dry!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just spoke with the vet, he said that the safest thing is to let them be free in their pasture (which is relatively large). We extended their pen to go back into the woods, but that floods very easily, so he said that the woods would not be a good option, and to block it off. He told us about a horse that sat in the middle of it's field in the middle of Charlie about 10 years ago. The wind would pick him up and move him, but that horse would go right back to the middle of the field.
He said that when people try to relocate their animals to "safer" enclosures or fields, the animals freak out since they don't know the area and end up dead more often than not.
So, I think what I will (attempt) to do is to reinforce their barns, build up the pen with additional dirt, and try to make the fence stronger.
We have a large "warehouse" like thing for our employees to keep equipment in, but I don't think that would even be safe in a storm. If I had maybe 5 goats, this would be super easy, however I have 22 of them to worry about.
 
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