The Goat Spot Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been posting a lot to trying to learn as much as I can about goats, and now have a new issue!

Our 3-month old Nubian wether just developed very soft stool, almost diarrhea-like. He's penned up with our new ND buck using premier fencing on grass. We pulled out the little buck (2 months old) and I'm pretty upset. I feel like our grass is just full of worms! Can goats get worms on grass they haven't grazed? I thought worms in goats occurs because they eat live worms, hatched from their own larvae. Can they develop worms from the larvae that exist on the grasses! I am so confused at this point. Is the wether able to get coccidiosis at this age, or do you think this is jut standard worms?

What can I use for the wether. I have safeguard and it seemed to have worked for our two does.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
8,197 Posts
Parasites (worms) can be in grass. Deer drop them, other animals, etc. Most worms are species specific, but some can effect more than one species.

The best way to figure out which worms your goats have is to take clean (not touched the ground) fecal samples to the vet. Then you will be able to treat them correctly. Safeguard does not always work well, anymore. It was overused and used incorrectly so, the worms developed an immunity.

The soft stool can be caused by worms, coccidea, fresh grass, heat, stress, etc. By taking a poop sample to be tested, you can figure out what is going on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,675 Posts
I have been posting a lot to trying to learn as much as I can about goats, and now have a new issue!

Our 3-month old Nubian wether just developed very soft stool, almost diarrhea-like. He's penned up with our new ND buck using premier fencing on grass. We pulled out the little buck (2 months old) and I'm pretty upset. I feel like our grass is just full of worms! Can goats get worms on grass they haven't grazed? I thought worms in goats occurs because they eat live worms, hatched from their own larvae. Can they develop worms from the larvae that exist on the grasses! I am so confused at this point. Is the wether able to get coccidiosis at this age, or do you think this is jut standard worms?

What can I use for the wether. I have safeguard and it seemed to have worked for our two does.
Is this his first time on grass? You have to let him at it slowly... like a bit of time each day... not just put him in a d leave him. His tum needs get used to new food.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
14,760 Posts
I agree that if he wasn't on pasture, or the grass is different, that you have to be careful so they can adjust to it. I'd give him probiotics and some B-Complex (orally is fine), and see if he bounces back. You can have a fecal done to rule out worms like others have mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,199 Posts
Take a deep breath, it's okay. This is totally normal for all young mammals. Worms are just part of the deal. As long as you aren't feeding hay and grain on the ground then don't panic about where they are coming from. Yes the goats grazing very over grazed grass short to ground can reinfect themselves over and over but at this age, parasites are just part of the normal. From approximately 6 weeks old through a year old, one could anticipate the goat to be needed to be dewormed possibly 3-6 times. And had prevention or treatment for coccidia as well

Don't remove the companion. That will just cause even more stress. Weaning is stressful, moving is stressful, and finding a spot in the pecking order is stressful.

Everything will be fine! We will help you. Use the tips mentioned above and we can work it out.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top