I need help with a grumpy male

Discussion in 'Beginners Goat Raising' started by amy_rainbow, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. amy_rainbow

    amy_rainbow New Member

    4
    Nov 13, 2012
    Hi
    Please can someone offer some advice, I am at the end of my tether!
    I bought a castrated male kid in March of this year (12 weeks old I think) and then I bought him a female kid. Everything was fine for awhile...they used to play around the garden, come into my studio, go for walks with us and the dogs. Woody the male used to sit on my knee and snuggle. All was well until a hidden testicle dropped (we bought him castrated) and he developed this temper where he would ram his horns into you repeatedly...my legs have been black and blue from him. I love him dearly but he is making me so sad. We had the surprise testicle removed by the vet but he is still butting and being a general pain in the neck. When I feed him he butts me until I can put his food in his bowl.
    The only time he is fine and a pleasure to be with is when he is out walking with us and enjoying 100% of our attention. When he is in the paddock with Bluebell (female goat) and the chickens he is ok until you go over then he butts and rams you.
    He is nearing 12 months old but I want to do something to make him nice again as I dont want to get rid of him but I bought him to be nice goat to play with children but I have to keep children away from him.
    Does anyone have any advice or suggestions?
    When he butts and rams you he twists he horns in and it can seriously hurt so I know a few people, me included, have lost there temper with him and grabbed his horns to twist his head away from you so they can make a run for it.
    When you brush him he is like putty in your hands but as soon as you stop, if there is nothing to interest him, he starts attacking again.
    I am exhausted by it all.
    PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE help!!
     
  2. erisfae

    erisfae Goat Mama

    78
    Sep 3, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Had a similar problem with one of my wethers. First and foremost, I'd recommend taping tennis balls to the end of his horns. I did that with my boy and it's wonderful! He quickly learned it wasn't as affective and backed down a bit. At the very least, it prevent serious damage.

    Grabbing and pulling horns just irritates them and may provoke him more. Instead, tweak his ear! A quick twist-tug and a shout of 'No!' always stops mine, right away.

    For feeding, If possible, I'd separate him from your doe. Try to feed him but, at the first sign of aggression, stop. Wait for him to calm and/or back away, and try again. It shouldn't take long for him to catch on that he doesn't get what he wants by headbutting. Don't be afraid to grab his ear when he butts you! He needs to know you're the dominant of the heard, not him. After a few days of pushing my wether away and not letting him get his way, he was a bit standoffish. I felt like a meanie when he wouldn't come up to me, but it was worth it. It took several days and a lot of patience for him to warm back up to me, like a shy goat to a stranger. Now, he's an all-around great goat. :D
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2012

  3. amy_rainbow

    amy_rainbow New Member

    4
    Nov 13, 2012
    Tried yanking his ears...even both of them but he just looks at me (as though he is laughing) rears onto his back legs then spikes me with his horns!
    Any other suggestions for the little tike??? ;)
     
  4. erisfae

    erisfae Goat Mama

    78
    Sep 3, 2012
    Pittsburgh PA
    Well, there's always the nose-twist. If you can, grab his upper lip and twist sharply. I've only used it on goats once, though, and it wasn't easy to get hold of. Honestly, your best solution may be a riding crop. Carry it with you and, when he comes at you, smack his nose. Every time he comes at you, he gets an unpleasant wack.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2012
  5. KarmakeeFarm

    KarmakeeFarm New Member

    635
    Jun 2, 2012
    how big of a boy is he? I have swept the legs out from under one of my previous bucks-he stopped after the 2nd time-he did not have horns-maybe a very loud horn when he does it to scare him? I hope something works!
     
  6. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Get a squirt gun. Goats usually don't like water.
     
  7. Arkie

    Arkie Junior Member

    571
    Sep 25, 2012
    North Central AR
    I suppose I'm a brutal, knuckle dragging hillbilly who might serve time if reported to some of the animal rights groups, but the first time ANY animal inflicted pain or injury to me or mine the memory of the thrashing they would receive (leaving no permanent damage) would last a lifetime. If there was a second incident, the lifetime would probably end up being pretty short.

    Bob
     
  8. zubbycat

    zubbycat New Goat Owner

    153
    Oct 13, 2012
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    One of the wethers I got does something a little similar, although not to the same extent. He has only actually butted me once. I'm a big advocate of force free training, and although I'm new to goats, the behavioral science behind training applies to all animals.

    You definitely don't want to reward him for butting you, so don't put his food down for him until he is calm and has all 4 feet on the ground. You want to always reward the calm behavior. I would recommend doing a little research on clicker training. That is what I'm doing with Nigel, and he has calmed a lot. I sort of try to "catch him being good" and reward that with food or scritches or other things he likes. It takes a bit of time, but its worth it because he will learn that bad behavior doesn't get him anything and good does.
     
  9. ladyharley

    ladyharley Senior Member

    373
    Sep 7, 2012
    New Mexico
    I started with that, but after a while, mine didn't care... My wether is just like the posters... I grabbed him by the horns today and twisted his head back hanging on to those horns and yelled no as I was walking him out of the pen... he is a butthead for sure.He makes sure the girls don't get in between me and them... and when it's food time, not funy... he is very possessive and he has never head butted me....I think I'd head butt him back LOL
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2012
  10. ThreeHavens

    ThreeHavens 7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether

    Oct 20, 2011
    New Jersey
    I don't believe in ever beating animals, but I do know what you mean. I have ZERO tolerance for poor behavior, and they know it. I do not hit them, but I will use the ear method, and I will scold them something fierce if I have to.

    The worst I've had to do is grab the ear and pull them for a few steps (much like you see in the movies when the teacher grabs the student by the ear :eek: ) If they're being bad enough I don't let them pull away. I will then go get their collar and give them a nice lesson on leading, setting up, etc. This gives them a constructive outlet for their energy. And if they behave for the setting up, I get to praise them, and the situation can be turned into a positive one.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2012
  11. Bambi

    Bambi Senior Member

    338
    Jun 9, 2012
    Central California
    We had a similar problem with a wether we were given. I carried a riding crop and whacked him firmly on the nose when he would try to butt. It took about ten times,but he finally quit. He would butt humans,dogs, and the rest of the herd. I put horn covers over his horns because he was ripping large holes in all our other goats. Finally six months later, he never wears the horn protectors and never butts anything. In fact he tries to snuggle with everyone and loves to be petted.Hopefully this will help you with your problem wether. It just takes patience.
     
  12. amy_rainbow

    amy_rainbow New Member

    4
    Nov 13, 2012
    Thanks for all the advice folks! Some great ideas which I pray work!!! Armed with Tennis balls (for horn covers) and a super squirter I hopefully will cure him!!!

    Also, if anyone has any ideas about making my female pygmy more friendlier then ideas welcome! She is about 10 months old but is still very nervous and skittish around people. Took me weeks to even get her to trust me enough to touch her now she will only let me for about 1 minute! She is beautiful and I just want to snuggle her! Ideas welcome!!
     
  13. Texas.girl

    Texas.girl Adopted by Goats

    Started having dominate issues with my Boer doe around her first birthday. Rancher told me to get a stick and hit her horns. They hate it. Amazing how fast she turned into a sweet polite lady. Our buck gets rambunctious at times but he knows what we do with sticks. Now he keeps he immediately calms down when we grab a stick. Yesterday we needed a shovel and the entire time we had a shovel in our hands, he kept his distance. Works like magic.
     
  14. amy_rainbow

    amy_rainbow New Member

    4
    Nov 13, 2012
    Lol...will try a stick! Although I hope non of this frightens my little female goat more than she already is!!! ;)
     
  15. Texas.girl

    Texas.girl Adopted by Goats

    Sticks work wonders. Why do you think sheep and goat ranchers own sheperds staff? I have 3 big goats in one pen (stinky and 2 does). Stinky is greedy. he jumps on the gate and I yell OFF. Everyone knows what off means. Then I enter once he obeys. But he jumps up trying to get to the food. Having a long stick in my hand really comes in handy at keeping him from getting to close to me.
     
  16. zubbycat

    zubbycat New Goat Owner

    153
    Oct 13, 2012
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    Great advice about tennis balls for the horns. I'm going to do that with Nigel so he stops scraping the donkeys up.
     
  17. ladyharley

    ladyharley Senior Member

    373
    Sep 7, 2012
    New Mexico
    I took some advice when my wether started pushing the girls away when I had food, I took a large stem (hard like a stick) and smacked his horns sideways, wow it worked he hasn't done it in my presence since yipee..
     
  18. sbhministry

    sbhministry New Member

    101
    Oct 12, 2012
    Our buck is almost a year. He likes to push with his horns or hook them around our leg. The sharp points had to go when he scraped his mother. I used a PVC pipe cutter and removed 3/4" from each horn. Much more would make him bleed. We carry a 2' piece of plastic pipe. Once he learned we are the boss and we don't play goat games, he is much better. If he puts his head down we raise our pipe. He backs down. Food is a little tougher. We guard our does grain with a shovel. The trick is to threaten when we is tempted. This save him from getting a clang on the horns.
     
  19. beautancus

    beautancus New Member

    8
    May 23, 2011
    I have a 3yr old billy that has become so aggresive that I"m left with only two options. give him away or castrate him. He has knocked my girlfriend down several times even I have to tie him up every time Im in the fence with him. will castrating him make him less aggresive? he"s a big goat and could very easily hurt someone
     
  20. KymberLeAnn

    KymberLeAnn New Member

    472
    Sep 16, 2012
    Yacolt WA
    Beautancus
    If I were you I would start a new thread about this.
    Castrating will calm him down a bit, but he definitely needs to learn who's boss.
    I would carry a big stick with you when you're around him to knock his horns when he threatens you.
    Or I've heard of others using squirt guns.