The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I did a search online. And get positive
and absolute no no on giving Ibprofen to
goats.
It only came up because Luke strained his leg
out in the wilderness and my son gave him
Ibprofen.
I was not there. He had no asprin so gave him
what he had. It did help and Luke is still
alive and not limping.
Of course as soon as I found out I went online
to see if my goat was going to die. And found
controversial information.
Anyone know why you can not use Ibprofen?
I know that it is dangerous for dogs and cats.
Oh and just for the record. Baby asprin is not
asprin. Not since the 70's and toxic shock syndrom.
I say this because alot of the websites say to use
baby asprin. :roll:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Just a quick question, from where did you get your information on aspirin? "Baby" and "regular" aspirin are chemically the same and have the same mechanism of action, the only difference being the taste/texture (because of additives for the baby asa to make it chewable and do I dare use the word tasty?) and concentration. Baby aspirin contain 81 mg of aspirin whereas regular aspirin contain 325 mg of aspirin, each respectively . As far as I know, that is the only clinical difference, and I give it routinely in my line of work so I try to stay current on research. Could you point me in the direction of your source on info? I am interested in learning more.. I know that this is a bit off topic but I give my horse and goats aspirin frequently and they seem to like the flavored baby aspirin more ;)
 

·
Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
Joined
·
4,805 Posts
You are correct. There is no difference other thent he dosage. There is a buffered aspirin that is easier on the stomach but thats about it.

Did some research and I couldnt not find a site saying Ibprofen was bad for goats. In fact found many that suggest using.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Back in the 70's/80's. After a friend of ours child died and aspirin was
determined to be part to blame.
Here is a 2011 article that may show that I am not off my rocker.

http://www.drdavidcotlar.com/?p=267
1980 the CDC began warning pediatricians to avoid aspirin and aspirin-containing products in flu and chickenpox, and later in other viral febrile illness
acetaminophen (Tylenol and others) and later ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil and others) became the stables of controlling fever and pain in pediatric illness
I was a young mother, then. And I remember they
changed baby aspirin. I just assumed it was still changed.
Looks like I need to read some labels. LOL
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top