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Hi all,
The does we got seem a bit skinny, clean on the fecal check. Any advice on what to supplement with to get them gradually to weight? They're browsing on brush and I've been giving them a bit of Artois goat feed, which is local to Cali, a sweet cob mix. Don't want to overload them with that. I've been told that alfalfa might lead to some issues in the heat out here (supposed to be 108 by Saturday) We've had them for two weeks and I know they've put on a couple pounds by the look and picking them up... Just want to make sure we're doing it the right way and get them as healthy as possible. Their bellies are fat but thin on the back behind the ribs to the haunches.
 

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Boers & Nubians
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I would deworm them and keep them on that sweet feed you are giving ;) People give beet pulp and stuff to, so I will let them answer with the more intricate things.
 

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They do look a bit skinny. You might consider buying some loose goat mineral high in copper in lieu of the salt block. You should also devise a way to feed the hay off the ground. Doesn't have to be an expensive feeder, you can usually make something pretty reasonable. I'm not familiar with Artois, but most COB feed is only around 10% protein and not properly Ca:p balanced. I would recommend something like Noble Goat Grower or Payback Boer Goat Developer. Both come medicated with Rumensin to help prevent Cocci and inhance rumen function. It's not as dangerous to over feeding as well. I would mix a little alfalfa in with the other grass hay to up the protein and calcium.
 

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Sunk in in front of the hip bones is usually an indication that they are not getting enough to eat, or what they are eating is not a high enough nutrition plane. I would supplement them with either a good quality grass hay or grass/alfalfa hay. Feeding bagged feeds is usually expensive and can cause more problems than it solves, so I would think long and hard before I took that route. Beet pulp will add roughly 8% protein, usually has a lower cost than grain and, more importantly, will increase their feed conversion along with several other benefits. Do some research and compare your costs before you decide how to handle this.
 

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Hi all,
The does we got seem a bit skinny, clean on the fecal check. Any advice on what to supplement with to get them gradually to weight? They're browsing on brush and I've been giving them a bit of Artois goat feed, which is local to Cali, a sweet cob mix. Don't want to overload them with that. I've been told that alfalfa might lead to some issues in the heat out here (supposed to be 108 by Saturday) We've had them for two weeks and I know they've put on a couple pounds by the look and picking them up... Just want to make sure we're doing it the right way and get them as healthy as possible. Their bellies are fat but thin on the back behind the ribs to the haunches.
I need to tell you about Atrois feed, it was a really good feed for quite a few years, we used it and it put the weight on our goats.
We notice our goat kids, weren't doing as well on it, about 2 years ago. Couldn't figure it out, it wasn't worms or cocci. The next year they were losing more weight and not looking so good or growing. Looked closely to the grain and low and behold, there was a lot missing, just by looking at it. We concluded, they are cheating buyers and leaving out the most important ingredients to help them put on weight and grow.
It is equivalent to cob now.

We stopped buying it, and telling all of our buyers, not to get it.

Getting any goat feed, that is high in protein will help with weight and growth.

I feed Alfalfa in hot or cold weather, it doesn't affect them at all.
But,If they are not use to it, give just a little, at a time, then increase.

Feeding to much hot feed, such as Alfalfa, will bloat or cause scouring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the advice all and heads up on the Artois feed TBG. I'm going to weld something together this weekend for a feeder.
 

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Well, here's what I'd do,

Calf Manna (or Excelerator)
Black Oil Sunflower Seeds
High Protein grain (try a grower grain)
Sweet feeds
Alfalfa pellets
Beet pulp
And some GOOD hay, pasture would help too.

The grain is what I use, just mix it all together. Its more of a show feed or a lactation feed mix, but it will put weight on fast.

My does get 6lbs a day of grain, and 2 lbs beet pulp if they eat it all. My does aren't great fans of beet pulp, so if yours don't like it try mixing honey or molasses in it.

Even if they only get a pound of grain a day, it will help a lot.

The way I mix it is
2 parts high protein grain
2 parts calf manna
2 parts sunflower seeds
1 part alfalfa pellets
1 part sweet feed
 

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My goats LOVE beet pulp, but it has to be soaked, they refuse to eat it dry.

Meat goat grower is usually a good thing to feed for weight gain because it has a higher fat and fiber % than regular feed.

Worm eggs do not always show up on fecals, it depends on the cycle of the adult worms. They could have worms that are not shedding eggs at the moment.

To fatten up thin dairy does, I feed a high energy pellet, soaked beet pulp, alfalfa pellets and top dress it with Rice Bran meal.
 

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Hi all,
The does we got seem a bit skinny, clean on the fecal check. Any advice on what to supplement with to get them gradually to weight? They're browsing on brush and I've been giving them a bit of Artois goat feed, which is local to Cali, a sweet cob mix. Don't want to overload them with that. I've been told that alfalfa might lead to some issues in the heat out here (supposed to be 108 by Saturday) We've had them for two weeks and I know they've put on a couple pounds by the look and picking them up... Just want to make sure we're doing it the right way and get them as healthy as possible. Their bellies are fat but thin on the back behind the ribs to the haunches.
I am getting ready to post up a before/after of my 2.5 year old buck. He is a boer and was 75lbs under weight. I've had him for a month and been doing nothing but natural treatments on him and changing his diet up. Please look for it with in the hour. Thanks.
 
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