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Hey everyone!! Sorry it has been so long, life has gotten busy busy busy!!

As you can tell from the title.... I am pregnant with my third and due mid April! Of course, that's exactly when I was planning to have my does kid. So, I need to change plans and was looking for any advice on when to plan breedings? I have two March doelings I was planning to breed this fall and then two does that I am planning to breed next month. For the doelings, they are already at the recommended weights and will be bred to a ND buck (they're lamancha and minilamancha) but I was planning to wait and breed them November-December. Now I'm wondering if it'll be worse to breed them then and have a newborn with me than it will be to breed them to kid before my own baby arrives..

So, is it better to go through kiddings while nine months pregnant, or while breastfeeding a newborn? I was also planning to bottle feed any doelings that are born but I'm willing to reconsider that.... Help me weigh this out please please please!
 

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Congrats on your pregnancy! I would probably lean toward after birth. I think it would be very hard to do all that in the 9th month. I'd also just leave kids on mom and make it easier on yourself.
 

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Ohhh congrats!!! I get so excited thinking about babies lol
Is this your first baby? I would have to lean more towards after as well. Don't get me wrong I was due any day with my son and I was still ridding a horse and doing things that I did before I was pregnant, the day I had my daughter my mom snapped a picture of me on a tricycle when I was showing my so. How to ride it. I felt great. But that's not always true for everyone. I loved being pregnant and I know a few girls that stopped at one because it was hell. I would probably plan for about a month after your due. You can get past all the postpartum fun and baby is still sleeping more then he/she is awake. 3 months seemed to be the turning point for my kids where it just seemed their naps were way farther apart and just kept being awake more then asleep. FYI play pens are a out side moms best friend ;)
 

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congratulations!! luv babies . My daughter was a January baby bang smack in the middle of summer and we are in the near tropics so humidity is horrendous with heat 35c +. I had my girls kid in the spring and was milking 8 by myself and bottleing all the kids and still going to shows when I was 8 months. Dr was not impressed when I told him I was still mowing the lawn in our heat and that Id lost weight he told me I should be resting. I told him Im pregnant not sick!
So as it turned out Husband had to milk as Id had an emergency cesarean that layed me up for a good 8 weeks.In the meantime husband complained about having to do the milking so I said fine :( and dried them all off.
So when bub was little Id put her in the stroller and she would go with me to feed the goats and chooks (chickens)so it all worked out in the end.Oh I also reared a baby Kangaroo while preg. teejae
 

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Catharina
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Congratulations!!!

Personally, I'd rather be 9 (or less, preferably!) months pregnant at kidding time. Otherwise you might have a hard time if nobody's there to take care of your baby while you take care of a kidding doe. It would be really stressful for all involved if the baby had to lie crying in a stroller next to the birthing pen while you tried to assist a doe with a kidding problem. Would you have to go back in the house afterwards to wash your hands before you could pick up your baby? I guess you could keep containers of sanitizing hand wipes around the barn...

Well, either way you'll find a way to manage--we mommies are good at that! How old are your other human kids? If they're at all old enough I'm sure they'd love to bottle feed your doelings or at least help. Maybe you could try to make that part easier by portioning & freezing goat milk now so it's ready to defrost & go. Easiest of course would be to make the mammas happy & let them nurse their babies. They'll still end up tame.
 

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Congratulations! How exciting for you!

I have no advice, but I have several questions that may help you and your family decide how to schedule breeding season.

How much can your hubby help?

How agile and strong are you? Some folks would have a tough time laying on the ground with their arm up a goat (and then getting back up!) (I shudder at how often I would have to leave the barn to pee!) Others wouldn't blink at the work.

I hope you're not planning to bottle feed this batch of kids. Are you?

What contingency plan can you have in place if your own pregnancy and/or birth aren't as easy as we all hope they will be?

How old are your other children and are they more of a help or a hindrance in the barn?

Do you have any neighbors who could step in to help for a while - maybe in exchange for milk.

Do you have any beloved relatives or friends who move in to either nanny or do goat chores for a month or so?
 

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GreenTGoats
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Congratulations!!!

I would certainly plan for your does kidding after you have your baby. My mom was due somewhere in the middle of my girls this year (thanks to a fence jumping buck I didn't have any due dates). What ended up happening was, she had her baby, a doe kidded five days later, and then a week after that. And the other one kidded three weeks later.

I'm really glad it happened that way, because if she had had the baby after kidding started, I would have had to figure out care of the kiddos, and I'm ready particular when it comes to my kiddos ;)

Also, you could always put the baby in a carrier to attend a goat birth. If your does are all healthy and not mineral deficient (which I am perfectly sure of from hearing how you keep goats :D) you shouldn't have problems anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for all of the responses!!


So this is my third, I have a two year old and a three year old. (The three year old will be four by then.) I wouldn't exactly call them a huge help or anything but, they're able to entertain themselves and help with small chores, I'm pretty sure my oldest would be a help with bottle feeding if needed. They're good kids and would be more on the helpful side than being more stress and work. My husband is an awesome daddy and if he is home, would be fully capable of handling the human kids but he knows nothing about the goats, although he'd do what I told him if needed. He does work full time though so, that limits his involvement. With my first two I had uncomplicated, unmedicated, natural deliveries. I also breastfed both and plan to do the same with this one, and I babywear, which might work with milking and such..gah, idk, we'll have to see I guess, so many variables and unknowns! I won't have much if any outside help from family or friends other than my husband. I do have a neighbor that would be happy to feed for me but she is not a "country" person (and she is an older woman) so, anything beyond that would be too much for her. And as far as my physical agility, well, I'm not exactly in the gym daily but I'm still fairly young and strong and don't have any health problems that hinder me. (Well, besides the human zapping my energy.)


So, it sounds like after the baby would be best and, if possible probably 4-6 weeks would be ideal? Assuming this isn't a colicky baby, that'd mean I would be likely fully recovered, able to take longer breaks between breastfeeding sessions and baby would still be napping often.

Oh gosh y'all, pray this will be a happy, easy child!! :D lol!!!
 

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Congratulations! I'm also expecting by third but I'm due in February which is when we kid for 4H kids. What I decided to do was pick 4 does to breed for January kids and the rest (7) I will breed in October for late March/early April kids. The problem with kidding before you have your baby is all the health risks when assisting a birth so I'm going to make sure I have lots if gloves on hand and only assist if needed. I'm also going to put up a barn camera so I'm not trekking back and forth pregnant or in the cold with a new baby
 

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First of all, congratulations!:balloons:
Then, flashback to 1981 when my 4th was due April 1. My doe had been at a friend's and was bred without authorization; so to speak. So we had no say in the due date. I remember well going to the doctor's the next week and explaining the iodine stains on my blue jeans from pulling not one but two head first babies.
Luckily, Rod and I have always shared the goat duties and he was the one with his arms up the goat. But I did need to assist. My advice from experience is to have them before and let the babies stay on Mom. I ended up having an emergency C-section and could not have milked daily and fed babies in those first weeks after. But Rod just made sure everyone was watered and fed before work in the mornings and I was able to get back into a milking routine by May.
Here's hoping for a smooth easy pregnancy and delivery.

>>>FYI play pens are a out side moms best friend<<<
Unless, and this is a true story, you walk past the playpen into the house, go into the nursery to find the baby gone, panic and start searching the house. Then just as the DH comes home cry, "I CAN'T FIND THE BABY!!!!" So then hubby panics thinking maybe our huge dog may have drug him under the house. (All this happened in about 2 minutes time.) Then, you go out the back door to find the baby, in his playpen, happily laughing at his feet; totally unaware of the chaos that has just ensued.

>>>I told him Im pregnant not sick!<<<
Amen to that, but that surgery can sure knock you on your butt!
 

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I agree with the goats kidding after you do! (by a month or two, at least). Best of luck to you having an easy pregnancy and delivery!
 

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I had my baby during kidding season.

One doe kidded when I had a month left to go and the other two weeks after I gave birth. I dam raise.

I'd have them kid when you are six weeks PP if you plan to bottle feed.
 

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Congrats!

For what it's worth, this is what I did when I was pregnant with my 3rd son and had a herd of both dairy cows and dairy goats.

I bred the does to kid in March, my son was due in early April. I figured it would be easier to deal with kidding without an itty bitty of my own who would want a bottle or a changing when I was trying to deliver a kid. The cows were on their own, but, the 3 that were due at the same time I was held off until i got home from the hospital. Back then they wanted to keep you for several days, but I left AMA on day 2 because of the cows. (and because I hate hospitals)

I used a lamb bar for the kids, back then I pulled all of them at birth because we shipped the goat milk with the cows milk.

For me it was no big deal because I had to be in the barn milking and caring for the cattle all thru my pregnancy and beyond. It did work out to be easier to deal with the goats kidding before I did. Jarrod was such a good baby, slept all night long from day 1, but most of my does kid during the day!

My kids were raised in a barn. I had cribs and play pens set up in the milk room and the main walk way in the barn.
 

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I would definitely delay goat breeding until after your baby is born. Assisting with goat births while pregnant can be pretty risky for your baby ESPECIALLY with regards to toxomplasmosis, chlamydia, and several other infections.
I can deff say that I had more bladder/kidney infections while my goats were in kidding season or if I were milking when I was pregnant. Stools were uncomfortable to sit on so I sat on the milk stand and the hay in their stalls... Even though they were clean I still ended up with some type of bacteria which not only was painful but frustrating...I did not put two and two together at the time though until it happened again in my third pregnancy!
 

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Congratulations! I am in a similar boat, except due mid-February, so am also arranging kidding around that.

I'm planning to bring in the buck around mid-November for mid-April to mid-May kids. That way I'll be past the craziest part of the newborn stage, and should be able to leave the baby with my husband or mom if I have to go down to the barn and assist.

I'm really hoping this baby is not colicky (my daughter was) and will be content to sleep in a wrap while I do milking and such. I'm planning everything to make it as easy as possible, with a screen-covered pack-n-play in the milking area, etc.
 

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Make sure you have a 'total emergency backup' of some kind - I didn't. And my own birth didn't go well, though it was predicted to be 'perfect'. I couldn't even get into a car by myself for weeks - I wasn't able to step _inside_ to sit down.

I had been very, very fit, but to be honest, it was two months before I could walk as far as the mailbox. :worried:

I know it totally sucks and it's REALLY rare, but if things go into 'ah crap' mode, you don't want to lose everything you've worked for.
 
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