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· Registered
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537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK.
I have the oppertunity to get a doe.
And I have my pick.
There is a registered Oberhasli yearling doe $100.
Or a large weanling mix doe (oberhasli/alpine) for $50

What I want is a milk doe. But my husband says to get
a doe that when she has kids. I can place the wethers easier
if they were packer prospects. He knows how I am. Always
fretting.
So can I get some of your opinions on this?
thank you,
 

· Registered
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537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
PS. This same person has 3 ober/alpine bucklings,
that she will be needing to sell. Is open to offers.
She lives on the Oregon coast. just let me know privately
and I will forward you to her.
 

· Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
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4,806 Posts
So your first goal is milk. With that in mind you need to check what each bloodline is producing and if the amount works for you. Here, every year, we get a few of the, "Oh we just had a great idea about getting a milking goat, so we can drink the milk and be all natural, blah blah blah." We refuse to sell to these kind of people as we know that even if they dont tire of the milking chores, there is just no way they will be able to handle a gallon to a gallon and a half a day. Which will put the doe as risk for mastitis and other udder ailments. (this is not to imply that you are like this but an example of what to much milk can lead to)

So, figure what you think you will be doing with it. A high production animal is great for someone looking to drink milk, make cheese and make soap with the milk. But if you are just looking for fresh milk in the morning and at dinner, a lower produce would fit better. So once you figure out your needs and which one of the does will work best if there is a difference in production. AND MORE IMPORTANT, udder shape, support, teet placement and how easy do the dams / grand dams milk. If they have small openings, you will become tired of milking real quick.

Now with that being said, and moving onto the pack prospects, of course the ober color is a big hit because they resemble an elk. But you will get hybrid vigor from a cross bred AND a good chance at the ober color especially if breeding to an ober buck.

Once you do the above, you will be able to choose just the right goat for you :)
 

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Easy milking udder as Dave suggested is important on a doe. You'll soon tire of the whole thing if the goats is hard to milk. If everything else is even, I'd pick the largest most structurally correct doe for future pack goat prospects. I'm guessing the crossbreed doe will be larger but can't say without seeing them. Upright pasterns, good feet and legs with a nice backline are all things to look for structurally.
 
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