In labor or not?

Discussion in 'Kidding Koral' started by Kristendanae, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. Ron at BFAD

    Ron at BFAD New Member

    24
    May 2, 2018
    Mercer, pa
    I don't know if its to late to do this, but when i was a lad and had goats my father and his father shared some information with me. I'm 68 now so i guess it's been a little while now. As my goats would get ready to kid, my dad said to feed them rye grain. And it would help with delivery, needless to sag my kids come flying out. Last kidding didn't have rye grain but had rye flour so fed it to the doe a couple of days before and they still flew out its an old farmers trick but seems to work.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2020
  2. Denise lynn

    Denise lynn New Member

    9
    Dec 1, 2019
    Texas
     

  3. Denise lynn

    Denise lynn New Member

    9
    Dec 1, 2019
    Texas
    Yes, that is normal for some goats. The clear thickish fluid is normal too. They can all be a little different each time they kid. When she is ready they start getting up and down, pawing the ground, wandering off to a quiet spot. They start straining and some will make blubbering noises, already talking to their babies to come. I had one that just kidded that acted like yours for two weeks before she kidded. Had two big bucks, so she was miserable.
     
    Moers kiko boars likes this.
  4. Denise lynn

    Denise lynn New Member

    9
    Dec 1, 2019
    Texas
    Invest in a vial of oxytocin. It is cheap and that is what the vet would give her unless you want surgery. I use after some kid if they have a difficult birth and may have retained placenta or a dead kid. It also helps if u have one that isn't making milk. Some their timing is off on milk coming at the same time they Kidd. Oxy will help them come into milk. I know a breeder who always gives a penicillin and oxytocin shot soon as they kidd, just to be proactive. My dog wasn't having her puppies, not pushing. One vet wanted $700 for a c section. My old vet told me to give her an oxy shot and a few minutes later the puppies finally started coming.
     
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  5. Denise lynn

    Denise lynn New Member

    9
    Dec 1, 2019
    Texas
    This will be my third post, so hopefully I will be a member now, have had goats since the 70's. I have raised dairy, angoras and now Boer which I put some dairy on them. I have 47 breed stock plus kids. Still calling the vet sometimes. Most vets are woefully ignorant about goats and give bad info. Hard to find a goat vet.
    Good luck
     
  6. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    Thats why we help each other on TGS! Its from experience & love of the goats! Please help all of us learn. It is important. For some...this is all they have! :up:
     
  7. FoxRidge

    FoxRidge Well-Known Member

    848
    Aug 25, 2016
    Minnesota
  8. Wild Hearts Ranch

    Wild Hearts Ranch www.wildheartsranch.org

    Dec 26, 2011
    Oxytocin causes contractions, which can be painful and even dangerous if the cervix isn't dilated. Shouldn't be used until they're already in labor - I've only given it afterwards to help pass the placenta. And giving antibiotics to a healthy animal "just because" is a major factor in antibiotic resistance. Since penicillin-class meds are used in humans as well, you could potentially risk worse infections in yourself as well as your animals.

    When I have a doe who's overdue I only use lute to induce. All it does it destroy the corpus luteum, which stops the production of progesterone and triggers normal labor. Much easier on them, I've never had any complications with that method. Some people also use dexmethasone, but steroids have a wide range of effects on the body and I prefer to only use it when it's specifically indicated. However, if you have to induce the doe early for her own sake (such as toxemia), dex will help mature lungs in the kids. I believe it needs to be given 24-48 hours before the lute though, to allow it as much time to work as possible. You can give it to the kids after they're born too, but their chances aren't as good if they're already having trouble breathing. I lost two this year that were premie (not induced, I think the doe was rammed.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
  9. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Please listen to this. Very important.
     
  10. Kristendanae

    Kristendanae Active Member

    Thanks for all your help. She had one that was dead and another that didn't last a full 12 hours. She is about to pass and I'll probably just have the vet put her down. I really don't know what I'm doing wrong at this point. I try to be extremely hands on and am constantly cleaning their pens and bowls. Keep mineral out and give them herbal dewormer 2 times weekly. But am not afraid to give them chemical dewormer if needed. Am constantly getting fecals to check and make sure everyone is good. They are in my care and depend on me and i have no idea what went wrong and I'm failing them. The vet said maybe "milk fever" I guess I just got lucky the first 2 years with not having any issues and now I've had multiple one die. I'm just at a loss.
     
    Trollmor likes this.
  11. Kristendanae

    Kristendanae Active Member

    I think the babies were early bc the ones lungs didn't sound developed and she was choking on milk. I guess I could've stressed her out and caused her to have them early. She didn't really like being handled and always ran from me.
     
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  12. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Milk fever is treatable.
    Calcium drench.

    Did the vet give you anything for it or recommend something?
     
  13. Kristendanae

    Kristendanae Active Member

    I gave her calcium drench which I had on hand and I don't know if it helped or not. Her temperature was good earlier today and she was eating and everything. Now she's on her side crying out and her temperature was 93 and she has diarhea still.
     
  14. Denise lynn

    Denise lynn New Member

    9
    Dec 1, 2019
    Texas
     
  15. GoofyGoat

    GoofyGoat Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2018
    TEXAS
    I'm so sorry about the kids and your doe having such a rough time of it.
    It's heartbreaking when things go so wrong.
    Can you try to warm her up and give her some flat dark beer. Wrapping her in An electric blanket might help.
     
    Trollmor likes this.
  16. healthyishappy

    healthyishappy Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2019
    Utah
    How much did you give them???
     
    Iluvlilly! likes this.
  17. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    Im sorry you lost the kidds. You did not do this! Part of our raising goats is loss. Things happen that we have No Control over! Please dont blame yourself. Just put your efforts into helping your doe
    Has she passed her afterbirth yet,? Is she warm? Sometimes with the loss of blood she will need warmth and b vitamins. Hang in there..
     
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  18. Kristendanae

    Kristendanae Active Member

    She passed as well. We tried warming her with heated blankets but she was too far gone. It was such a cold day here.
     
    Trollmor likes this.
  19. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    What a heartbreaking thing to happen, and right before Christmas! First off, this was not your fault. Sometimes bad luck happens, and for some reason it usually happens all at once.

    Calcium deficiency (milk fever) is possible. It would explain the lack of contractions. If the doe was unable to push, labor would not have proceeded as normal. I'm guessing the first kid in line was the one that was dead on arrival?

    For future reference, if you see strings of clear goo but nothing happens within half an hour or so, do as Goats Rock suggested and have a feel inside. Sometimes the doe can't push because of calcium deficiency, and other times it's because a kid is positioned wrong. A kid in the birth canal stimulates strong contractions (it's why a doe contracts reflexively when you put your hand inside). But if the kid is laid wrong and can't get into the birth canal, it won't stimulate strong contractions, which is why you might see labor fizzle out or not really even start at all.

    In either of these cases it's very important to help the doe by reaching in after the kids. It sounds scary but thank goodness with goats it's usually pretty straightforward and doesn't take a ton of strength or special skill (although it helps to have small hands). If you think your doe might be in labor but nothing is happening, it's ok to take a quick feel inside to be sure. If she's in labor the cervix will be open and introducing your hand will stimulate contractions. You'll feel some part of a kid either in the passage or stuck at the end of the passage. If she's not in labor you'll have a hard time getting much more than your fingers inside, you'll hit a dead end, and no harm done by having a quick feel other than your goat might be kind of mad at you.

    Once again, I'm sorry this happened but it's not your fault. I'm sure you didn't cause it by making her nervous. Any time an animal gives birth there's a chance of something going wrong. I hope your other kiddings have happy endings.
     
    MadHouse, GoofyGoat, Trollmor and 2 others like this.
  20. Moers kiko boars

    Moers kiko boars Well-Known Member

    Apr 22, 2018
    Oklahoma
    You did everything you knew to do. Its an awful feeling to lose something you love and are wanting to see. It is part of being human. We try to do all we can. The best we can. Sometimes we dont win. Please take this education and apply it . You have grown immensly in your knowledge of goat birthing. Its a risk for all of us.