Is a $200k budget good and drylot questions

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by AlabamaGirl, Nov 23, 2020.

  1. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    If she wants dairy there are many more considerations than meat goats. You need to bring them in and milk 2x per day per head. Grain and calcium requirements are higher for a milking doe as well. I agree to start smaller. The start up cost can be extremely high - plan to not make an income for a good long time.
     
  2. AlabamaGirl

    AlabamaGirl Active Member

    137
    Jun 18, 2020
    Southeast
    Thanks!
     

  3. NigerianDwarfOwner707

    NigerianDwarfOwner707 Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2018
    East Coast, USA
    Errm, no, 10k gets you about this: 1600x1200-woodtex-the-original-535x363.jpg
     
  4. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    Since this is all hypothetical and "someday in the future," something to think about would be buying a place that is already largely set up the way you want. Even if you had to improve the fencing or redesign the barn, that would be a heck of a lot cheaper than building from scratch. When you're ready to start thinking about launching out on your own, look around the country for property you can afford. I'm often astounded at how cheap property is out east compared to here in Colorado! Heck, even within a single state there are places that are super cheap compared to others. I got lucky and found an undiscovered corner of Colorado where I could afford to buy a gorgeous house and property for 1/3 the price it would have been in most of the state. Now my area is discovered, but places come in and out of fashion over the years and sometimes the bottom falls out of an area because a factory or mine closes (or in our case where a land scam from the 1970's tainted the area's reputation for over 30 years!).

    One of the smartest things my husband and I did was we took a couple of years to tour the west before we owned anything. We packed up our camping gear and went on a series of road trips through various states we thought we'd like to live in. We narrowed it down to Colorado and then toured this state, picking up real estate brochures in every area that piqued our interest. When we got home we poured over the different prices for comparable real estate and eliminated a lot of areas right off the bat. It was a lot of fun and set us up for success in the long run. If I'd just been going for "cheap" I would not have chosen this state. I would have spent my time looking east of the Mississippi. However, "cheap" wasn't our highest criteria. Public land access was. Figure out what's most important to you and then go from there.
     
  5. AlabamaGirl

    AlabamaGirl Active Member

    137
    Jun 18, 2020
    Southeast
    Thank you, I use to want things for cheap but I'm starting to figure out it's going to cost be quite a bit if I want a sturdy farm.
    That teeny thing?!
     
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  6. NigerianDwarfOwner707

    NigerianDwarfOwner707 Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2018
    East Coast, USA
    When are you planning on starting your goat venture?
     
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  7. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    Not necessarily. I remember being astounded one time when I went back to western NY for a visit and saw a farm for sale for $150,000! It was fenced, had a newish house, nice barn, good fencing, and a huge, fantastic equipment garage. I can't remember exactly how many acres but it was at least 20 and maybe more like 50. It was located in the poorest county in NY state so real estate was very cheap there. If you're flexible on the location, you can sometimes find some amazing pieces of property that already have many of the features you want but would be very expensive to build or buy from scratch.
     
  8. AlabamaGirl

    AlabamaGirl Active Member

    137
    Jun 18, 2020
    Southeast
    That sounds like a steal! I'm always on the lookout for a good deal especially if it's in the south.
    After highschool, I'll more likely than not have a job, and I read that people usually spend half the time in class during college than in highschool. So I was thinking that this would be the best time to start again. I'll also have support from my family too, so if I can't milk that day they probably would.
     
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  9. CountyLineAcres

    CountyLineAcres Well-Known Member

    Jan 22, 2014
    Mineral Ridge, Ohio
    You may spend less time in class, but I can promise you that compared to college, high school is a breeze. While, yes, most of the work is done outside of class, it is a blessing and a curse... especially if you have another job or are in any clubs on top of that. I recommend waiting until you’re a semester or two in and have a job, so you can see if the workload is too much.
     
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  10. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    I had the opposite experience... for me college was a breeze compared to high school, and I went to a very high-end college. But then, I was homeschooled during high school so... yeah. ;)
     
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  11. AlabamaGirl

    AlabamaGirl Active Member

    137
    Jun 18, 2020
    Southeast
    Hopefully it'll be a breeze for me too!
     
  12. CountyLineAcres

    CountyLineAcres Well-Known Member

    Jan 22, 2014
    Mineral Ridge, Ohio
    It will definitely depend on your major!
     
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  13. shunter10

    shunter10 New Member

    3
    Feb 23, 2013
    I have been teaching biology to college freshmen for 32 years, and we have a farm with boer goats, so I know a little about the time required for both activities. If you want to do college well, don't plan to start a dairy goat operation while you are doing that, especially if you also have to work off the farm to pay bills, etc. We obviously don't milk our goats, but I know people who have dairy goats and it is a full time job in itself. Also, talk with lots of people in the business so you have a good idea of what is involved. It won't answer all your questions because actually raising goats is different than just having information. We bought an old cow dairy farm and didn't start goats for several years. We started with a few goats and talked with everyone I met who raised them. I also read everything I could, and joined this group where there is alot of experienced folks willing to share information. We try to plan kidding in Dec and Jan between semesters so it doesn't conflict too much with the college work. I have lots of support from family and friends when I need extra strength managing the bucks, hoof trimming, barn repair, etc. Start small, small, small because you can quickly get overextended especially with college work.
     
  14. Caileigh Jane Smith

    Caileigh Jane Smith Well-Known Member

    269
    Dec 1, 2019
    Missouri, USA
    My first bit of advice would be to find a good mentor! I have connected with a couple of goat people in my state, now, and they are generally quite excited to help out a younger person who's getting started in goats.
    I have had goats for about two and a half years now, and this was my first year with kidding and milking. It was a lot, even though I was only milking two does! There's just so much maintenance that goes into taking care of a milk goat, and then you have to think about the proper handling and storage of the milk, plus all of the work that goes into marketing and selling your product. I'm so glad that I started small, otherwise I think I would have gotten burnt out really fast!
    Even if you have an amazing mentor, you still have to develop an eye for things that may be going wrong with your goats, and head them off before they become a big problem. Nobody else can do that for you. I don't know what you're playing to study in college, but I can tell you, college can be very intense! I made the choice to skip college, since I did not need to go to college to learn any of the things that I wanted to learn, but several of my close friends did go, and I got to be there for all of the stressed-out conversations. I'm not saying that to discourage you, but I definitely agree with those who are encouraging you to get your feet wet in college before you try to start dairy goats. I am working a part-time job in a town near me, on top of doing my goats, and a small business out of my house, and most days, I feel like I'm running around like a chicken with its head cut off. I don't actually know how many hours a day I work, but it's quite a few! And when you're the one who's solely responsible for your goats, you have to figure out ways to deal with emergencies, birthing, etc, on top of getting to work on time or showing up for class at the right time. It's definitely worth the struggle, but I am currently actively seeking a job that will give me more flexible hours, so I can be there for my goats a bit more. There have been multiple occasions, now, when I have had to call in late for work, or leave my goats in a situation I wasn't 100% comfortable with, simply because my animals do not understand schedules, and will not confine their births or catastrophes to non-working hours. :D
    That being said, it's very exciting that you want to do this! And The Goat Spot is definitely the right place to come for advice! But again, I would definitely encourage you to try to find a goat mentor; someone who is doing what you want to do, and best case scenario, lives close enough to wherever you end up starting your goat venture that he / she can come over and help you out with the hands-on stuff when you need it.
     
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  15. goatblessings

    goatblessings Fair-Haven Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    Southwest Ohio
    I would keep making plans, but do nothing until you are working and in school. My kids did both, and it's a lot to keep up with by itself. They had no time for anything else. Keep planning, find great dairy producers, and study hard.
     
  16. AlabamaGirl

    AlabamaGirl Active Member

    137
    Jun 18, 2020
    Southeast
    I won't be starting a large dairy operation, just a hobby one and I'll grow it to no more than 10 animals because of my property size and until I finally get my MD and have my own property.
    Hopefully!
    I'll definitely want to find a mentor when I start my farm again, my hobby farm will probably be me just milking goats and making treats for myself and my family. Nothing too-too major, and I'm DEFINITELY going to keep it relatively slow because after college I still have 8 more years of education before I can finally start actually working.
    I'm going to keep planning until I can balance out my schedule with all I plan to do!
     
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  17. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    Think about why you even want to go to college. College is super expensive. If mine hadn't been completely paid for by my grandparents it would have been a huge, regrettable mistake setting me up for long-term debt and financial difficulty with limited career choices as a result. If you go to college, make sure you have a specific purpose for going and a very detailed plan on exactly how to pay for it.

    You may do well to go to a few specific classes at an ag school but skip the degree. You can learn things about business and financial planning, marketing, genetics, and all kinds of other things that are very important for running a farm business. If you go to classes targeted specifically toward your eventual goals you could get much of the benefit of college without so much time and expense wasted on a degree that includes a lot of stuff you'll never use. I mean, racquetball was fun and all, but those college credits cost money and time that have served me no purpose in the 20 years since I took it, and my calculus classes were a total waste of time. In fact, I could list a lot of courses I took that were a total waste of time (and money!). I think a lot of people who go for a college degree would tell you the same thing. The time and money you spend on a degree sure cuts into the time and money you have to launch into business!
     
  18. Damfino

    Damfino Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    Ah... I posted while you were writing your last reply and didn't see the part about you wanting to get your MD. Well, if you go into medicine you can't skip the degree. ;)
     
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  19. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    I told my daughter when she was in college that college is a full time job- whether on or off campus. Then her job was full time and then she added a boyfriend. They talked about marriage. I asked how could she do 3 full time jobs and still sleep? (spouses require a lot of work!). So she gave up the idea of marriage until after college.. oh, and he dumped her and she was super happy to find out there were many other good men out there that shared her passions in life!

    The only reason I bring this up is, probably at some point- you may meet a potential love interest. (what is the appropriate term?) and then your goals may change. But, if you are set on a goal, unless harmful, don't let anyone derail you. If someone really cares about and for you, they will aid you and not play the "if you really love (like) me you wouldn't do that.... Strive for whatever you think will bring you success and contentment in your life!
     
  20. AlabamaGirl

    AlabamaGirl Active Member

    137
    Jun 18, 2020
    Southeast
    Thank you! Hopefully, if I ever get a boyfriend in college he'll be more than happy to join me in my hobby!
     
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