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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had anyone on here made yogurt with their raw goats milk? This is my second batch and it's really runny... Taste a lot different but I've followed the directions both times...If it is supposed to be runny, any ideas on how to thicken it up a bit?
 

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It is runnier than the stuff that you buy in the store, because they add gum to theirs. However, I add 1/4 cup of dry milk per quart to the yogurt before I put it aside in the heat. This thickens it up and adds some depth to the flavor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I think I'll try that next time, because I'm quite sure this second batch is not yogurt. It is rather weird tasting, not bad, it just looks like curdled milk... I know we lost out power for a bit so maybe that's why...
 

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It is critical to hold it at the proper temp for the proper amount of time. I have yet to get that part working right.
 

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Here in Arizona, the proper temp is the outside temp, LOL, but if you have an oven with a proof setting, that's perfect. We put ours in there overnight, in the jar, with a plastic cap on top, for 8-12 hrs and it comes out wonderfully.

For us, the longer we keep it in the tangier it gets. We like ours to double for sour cream, so we stop at about 10 hours and it can go either way--on top of potatoes or mixed with fruit.
 

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Are you making sweetened or unsweetened? I made both in my biology class one time (with cows milk) and the unsweet was nasty! I don't know if it makes a difference in taste or consistency, but my biology teacher did say it was important to heat the milk first to kill any other bacteria that might be in it, even with store bought pasteurized milk, so that the good bacteria (that makes the yogurt) is the only bacteria growing in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was going to use the oven but the lowest setting is 170 f isn't that too hot? I was thinking of just getting a yogurt maker off of CL...
 

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if you just turn on the oven light it will keep it at the proper temp. at least mine does. i heat the oven up for couple mins then turn it off. then leave the light on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
if you just turn on the oven light it will keep it at the proper temp. at least mine does. i heat the oven up for couple mins then turn it off. then leave the light on.
Really? Yeah, thanks for the tip... That would be much easier:)
 

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I make it using my oven at the lowest temp (150). I heat the oven until the light goes off, then I shut it off and let it set. Every so often I put the heat back on for a few minutes. I leave it sit overnight, sometimes longer, until it thickens.

I always pasteurize the milk first because of all the other bacteria that will grow and possibly over take the "good" cultures. When I make yogurt for my dogs, I do leave it raw and it does sometimes come out wrong because of the contamination.

To me, unsweetened, unflavored yogurt tastes like Elmers Glue.

Gelatin, dry milk, stuff like that will help thicken it.

170 will kill the bacteria, most pasteurizing is done at 165.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I heated it to 180... as per the direction. So I did pasteurize it first. I think I'm going to try the oven method next, and will put some gelatin in it as well...
 
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