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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
New goat owner here :) Couple of weeks ago we brought home two goats. One of them we got for free from someone we know and he never intruduced her to a buck since he had no desire to milk or deal with kids. She is two years old, which means she will be three or close with her first kids. Some woman who has goats was concerned she might have dificulty with kidding at this age. What would be the best thing to do: get her to a buck and not to worry or keep her as pet and find a younger goat?
Since everybody love photos, that's her and her name is Fly (in eanglish, Musė in my language)
DSC_0170.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
She's only two weeks here and I am feeding her well, minerals ect. so until the end of the summer she should be well fed. Not easy to do fecal here so I will see how she's doing. Thank's!
 

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If you cannot get a fecal, I would check her inner lower eyelid coloring.
Check for anemia.

It won't hurt to treat for cocci.

But if she is anemic, we have to be careful on what and how, we use a wormer.
 

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She's only two weeks here and I am feeding her well, minerals ect. so until the end of the summer she should be well fed. Not easy to do fecal here so I will see how she's doing. Thank's!
You can do your own fecals, you would need a microscope and a special slide, but it's not too difficult if you would be interested.
 

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Just wanted to chime in here and say that my doe had her first kidding about 3 weeks ago. She was almost exactly the same age as your doe (about 3 years old), and everything went beautifully. Kidding was quick and easy, the kids are healthy and growing well, she's giving lots and lots of milk. As those with more experience have commented above, it would be good to work on getting your doe into better condition before she is bred, but I thought I'd just share my experience with you as an encouragement. :) Best of luck with your doe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just wanted to chime in here and say that my doe had her first kidding about 3 weeks ago. She was almost exactly the same age as your doe (about 3 years old), and everything went beautifully. Kidding was quick and easy, the kids are healthy and growing well, she's giving lots and lots of milk. As those with more experience have commented above, it would be good to work on getting your doe into better condition before she is bred, but I thought I'd just share my experience with you as an encouragement. :) Best of luck with your doe!
Thanks! And happy for you and your doe :)
 

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You shouldn't have any problem breeding her at that age! She had very nice coloring, and looks like a sweet doe. :)
As they others said above, have you checking her inner, lower eyelids for any sign of worms? Do you happen to know her Famacha score? Here's a chart so you don't have to look it up, unless you already have one. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
CaramelKittey, thank you so much, it somehow did not come to mind to look for something like this. She's not used to handling at all and runs from any attempt to touch her (eats from hand and runs to meet me, but no touching!) so I left her alone for now and did not want to scare her to much by force handling since she looks fine otherwise, runs and jumps like a playfull happy goat. We will have to catch her for some hoove triming soon anyway so I will check the eyelid at the same time.
 

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CaramelKittey, thank you so much, it somehow did not come to mind to look for something like this. She's not used to handling at all and runs from any attempt to touch her (eats from hand and runs to meet me, but no touching!) so I left her alone for now and did not want to scare her to much by force handling since she looks fine otherwise, runs and jumps like a playfull happy goat. We will have to catch her for some hoove triming soon anyway so I will check the eyelid at the same time.
No problem!
That sounds like a good idea. Do you have a milking stand or some way to hold/brace her? Maybe a lead rope tied tightly on a fence? Goats tend to kick when you trim their hooves so hopefully she behaves herself! You may want to wear gloves while trimming her hooves just in case she kicks and you get hurt but, at the same time, I don't use gloves so I can get a good feel for their hooves. Most people choose to wear gloves. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have my husband :D I do not use glove anywere I can avoid. I like to feel thing I am working working with with bare hands so I guess I will not be using them :) I already trimmed hooves on my second goat and we did pretty well. Not there yet, but I go easy on both my goats and myself. We plan to put some big rocks we have laying around in the pasture for them to climb on and I guess it will help with hooves too.
 

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Sounds like you are all ready to go! (thumbup)
Having rocks in the pasture is a good idea to wear down their hooves. If you want to, you can use a small rasp to even out the hooves after you trim them. I find I am always just a little nervous with the clippers so I like to do all the harder, finishing touches with the rasp but, it's up to you. ;)
I'm glad to hear everything went well with the first goat!
 
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