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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does this doeling appear underweight? She had just started eating in this picture from the topside, and any from the side will have to go in responses since file naming on an iPad is not smart.

Ruby is five months old as of yesterday, and weighs 53-55 lbs (giving a little bit of room for error due to weighing via the human-holds-the-goat-on-a-bathroom-scale method). However, she is the same height as my almost six month old doeling (six months next Monday) who is 65 lbs (both doelings have the same sire, different dams obviously). Ruby is definitely narrower over all.

If she does seem underweight, what can I do to get some weight on her? She currently gets to graze and gets feed twice a day. I give hay on days when they don't want to leave the barn due to wind, snow, rain, or some other event that makes them go all special snowflake on me.

Also, I had been feeding Noble Goat (ducks behind something big to avoid the grooming brushes about to be thrown), but I want to switch to something else (comes out with hands in the air). Not many options locally. If I have to mix feed I will, but I haven't done that before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Health history on Ruby:

At three weeks old, she had a bout of pneumonia. We also spotted lice. treated the pneumonia and dusted for lice.

She was showing signs of copper deficiency recently, so all three got bolused last weekend. We have high amounts of iron in our soil. Anything magnetic gets it stuck to it. I am having our soil tested next month for both the goats and our garden's benefit.

Her eyelids are getting pinker again. They were on the pale side.

I had her stool sample checked nearly two weeks ago. At that point her stools were on and off soft, not always berries. She had roundworm. I wormed with Safeguard and gave her a BoSe shot. Then I realized our friends, lice, were back, so I went the route of Ivomec SQ. Didn't do the shot right (tented skin, but accidentally poked out other side of the tent, so only partial dose went in). In the meantime using Python dust.

They have some dandruff, so I am going to start adding some vitE to their food.

On the upside, her coat is glossy (except where she is scratching with her back feet up by her shoulder), and she is an eating machine who is energetic and cuddly.

I got some of the herbal worming stuff, as I would rather not be putting so much chemical stuff in them. I came in the mail a couple days ago. Haven't used any of it yet.
 

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She's not quite as plump as I like to keep my doelings over winter, but she's not underweight either.
 

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If you feel their ribs, is there a layer of muscle over them, or just skin?

I hear ya on the Noble Goat, I hate it, the goats don't like it, but I am having the darndest time finding something better around here! Free choice alfalfa is good for growth.
 

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You could add some alfalfa pellets or calf manna. She doesn't look underweight but could be a little heavier. Really not bad though.
 

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Not sure if you are more looking for an explanation; but my dairy doe just got skinnier and bonier for really no good reason; one of the vets at my feed mill said that condition was key and to feed corn. Which I did. And now that her frame is back on and she's getting plenty carbs, she is thriving. Odd because I had the babies on grain as well, so I couldn't figure out why her and no one else. The corn though (whole, not cracked) is apparently a goat equivalent of a pasta meal vs salad in humans. Both are good to eat, but growing toddlers cannot live on 'salad' (i.e. pellets) alone and they need full fats and carbohydrates for many good reasons. Maybe that's a terrible analogy. Anyhow, from a vet's advice, and it worked in spades!!!!
Good luck!

Ps and I have tapered it off, now that she is robust, I don't want her overweight :)
 

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My Bella is like that, and calf manna worked. She is still on the thin side, but she had a rough start, she's only 5 months. So she gets grower pellets, alfalfa and beet pulp pellets, and some spent brewery grain which she shares with a friend Beebop who is a couple months younger. Hay too:)
 

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I agree...not too thin..I too like them to come into the cold months a bit thicker..but she is by no means underweight..and her coat is glossy...you did well with her!..You can add wheat germ oil to her food or mix 50/50 wheat germ with flax seed in enough coconut oil to make a paste..I fed 2 tablespoons a day to my girls who had flaky skin and dry patches...they love it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks. Sorry I didn't get back on here sooner. My daughter's tenth birthday was yesterday, and I am turning a 7cubic foot freezer box into a Whac-A-Mole costume for my eight year old son's Halloween costume. And my youngest has his birthday in a couple days. This part of the month gets a tad crazy.

I do remember now that the breeder from whom we got all three goats feeds something different. i think she said ADM? I have Timothy/alfalfa pellets and a little bit of alfalfa hay left. I give the doe her usual feed, and give her the pellets if she runs out before I am done with her (having to do frequent trims to work on her wonky hind hooves). I will talk to the breeder (I have a feeling Bree didn't take when we bred her three weeks ago, which might not be a bad thing since she started showing signs of copper deficiency about the time I bolused her and the little girls a few days ago) and see where to find better feed around here. If I'm wrong, I'll look into some of the suggestions on here. Now the doe on the other hand, she has no food to fat conversion problems (140-145 lbs). I've bee cutting her back some on feed, but still have to resort to giving more alfalfa pellets if I need to work on her feet.

Yeah, the girls are glossy. They have dandruff underneath, but are glossy as all get out. They also try stealing my sunflower heads that are drying in my garage right now. Little goobers.

For comparison, here is my other doeling from above. I don't know if Ruby is tall for age, making her look skinnier compared to Tulip, or if Tulip is short for age/stocky in build.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here are some pictures of both of them together. Like I say, there isn't much difference between them height wise, but my other doeling is more solidly put together. At least, there should be some pictures if they ever choose to upload. Okay, so they finally attached. Anyway, Tulip is definitely a wider built girl. I am not sure if that is the main difference in them.

Ruby is barely shorter than Tulip, but by so little that they look nearly the same. Tulip, as of a week-ten days ago, was 65ish pounds. Is Ruby tall but narrow framed, or is Tulip just more solidly built or short?

I have also included a picture of all three goats, so that you can see their size compared to the doe, who measures with a tape at 140-145lbs.

The differences are more pronounced than any picture I took out there would let you see.
 

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We feed black oil sun flower seeds for dandruff. I just mix it right in with the grain. At first they go nuts for it so you could give it as a a treat all by itself if it isn't something they are used to getting. Mine get it all the time now to keep that glossy coat and moisturized skin. Just a thought for you. We have a young buckling who will actually nibble out all the sunflower seeds and leave his grain behind. Unbelievable! I sat there and watched him one day. He pushed the grain pellets out of the way to eat the seeds. Blows my mind how smart they can be sometimes!
 

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Feel their ribs. How hard/easy is it to feel the bone? If you can just lay your hand on their rib cage and feel bones, then they are too skinny for sure, but if there is a layer of fat/muscle on them, they should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I took in a stool sample on Ruby to retest after the roundworms being found last time. Two eggs total on the whole slide! And they totally will remember me.

I knew I needed to get a sample and retest her so I can sleep at night (mildly obsessive here). I sent my daughter back into the house when I saw Ruby poop, and my daughter brought me some latex gloves. While waiting for said daughter, I remembered I am out of ziploc baggies. So what do I do? I use the gloves as baggies. Picked up the poop with one hand, took off the glove inside out, and used the "clean" glove to bag the other glove. Shoved that puppy in my pocket. Later on, I took that glove baggie to the vet's office. The vet, who has only seen me once before, asked as soon as I came in the door if I was bringing another sample from my goat (I hadn't called before I came up there, as they don't require that for stool testing). So bonus points that she remembered me (of course, I do have pink streaks in my hair and I mentioned FAMACHA last time she saw us, which baffled the desk workers at the vet clinic). They busted up laughing when they saw in what I brought the stool sample. Yeah, I am sure they will probably remember me as the crazy pink haired, poop gloved, eyeball gazing woman with goats. Thankfully, Ruby's stools were nice, firm little berries and not the soft stuff I brought in two weeks ago.
 
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