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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! We are pretty new to all things goat, and it seems we just can't get the hang of them. We have alpines that we bred to a boer, and got some pretty nice looking babies. Trouble is, I feel that I have had to doctor these goats more in the year that we've had them then I have my horses in the 10 years that I've had THEM!
We weaned a few of our older babies a couple of weeks ago, and have been milking one of the mamas since, once/day. At first I was worried she might have mild mastitis because I thought her milk tasted slightly salty, but my husband thought it was fine. The next couple of days, though, it tasted great and my kids were even asking for it! (When I first started milking a month after the goat kids were born, my kids liked it, then we had a worm flare-up and some resulting nutritional issues, and the milk tasted really 'goaty,' causing my 4 year old to ask every time I gave him milk, 'What kind of milk is this?')
So, anyway my husband has been milking this past due to my work schedule, etc, and because I'm a control freak, we've been using it for the kittens or to put in my freezer stash for lotion and soap. Today, though, I had some extra time and thought it would be nice to have some to drink again. I 'filter' the milk with a clean towel over the bucket as I milk, then filter it again when I bring it in the house. When I was pouring out the last of the milk from the bucket, I noticed small chunks, for lack of a better term, of congealed milk.
It's cooling right now, so I haven't tasted any, but what else could this be?
Also, this particular doe will give anywhere from 1.5-2 qts for my husband, but 0.5-1qt only for me! :(
Any suggestions??
Thanks and sorry for such a long post!!!!!
 

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Definitely do a mastitis test.

Has it always been that the goat gave you less milk or just since your husband has been milking? It may be your technique.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, her udder does not feel hot, although it does feel 'ropey' which is another red flag, if I'm correct? When we had a first freshener get mastitis BAD early this summer, she had actual chunks in her milk, blood, the whole nine yards. This was just some spots of congealed milk in the bottom of the bucket. I know the bucket was clean because I'd just washed it. :)
I have a bovine mastitis test that I got from our local farm supply store, but I'm not sure it's reading right. It didn't even react when our young doe had the bad case of mastitis mentioned above.
My husband never really milked earlier this year after we first started milking - that was more my thing and he's just been helping out lately. Maybe he's just a natural? She actually gave the most from all our goats earlier this year, which is why we chose to milk her and let the others dry up.
I'm just sick of all the meds we've had to give these goats - antibiotics, wormers, etc. Maybe I just wasn't prepared for all the meds goats really require?? I don't think we have a dirty environment. They were pastured with a run-in shed for most of the summer and were recently just moved to a smaller pen that goes into our machine shed for the winter.
Maybe my Negative Nancy side is just showing tonight. :)
Thanks for your quick replies!
 

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Do a search on here for a mastitis test with dish soap.

There is a lot more to livestock than people realize. But getting the goats copper and selenium levels right will really help with a lot of issues.
 

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Hey I agree with you. I have had horses for over 20 years and hardly a problem. These goats are high maintenance. I have been shocked at how much you have to give them care and meds to keep them healthy.I do love them and love to milk also. So will pro ally keep them.
 
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