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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. So there’s this tree right next to my fence, and I’m unsure what it is. Every app I’ve used to identify is unsure too.
Sorry if this is something entirely different, I have no knowledge of plants at all. Please don’t laugh.
Obviously I’m concerned, because yew is extremely toxic. There’s an electric fence between, but I’m still worried.
 

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No, shame in being concerned when it comes to the health of your goats. It is a very serious matter when their health is at stake.

It looks like it could be it to me, but Im not an expert on identifying trees/plants. I would cut off all the low branches and branches anywhere within reach of your goats just to be on the safe side.

Have you seen any yew berries on it? It could just be a type in the pine family, but I always like to play on the safe side when it comes to something as toxic as yew can be.
 

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It looks nothing like the Yew that is native to America. The bark is the telling feature.
 

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I shall send a link to a friend who knows about plants.

And welcome, Fool! :)
Got half an answer: "Is there no photo of the entire plant? I THINK it is a normal spruce, but I need a picture of the whole plant, where I can se both the trunk and the twigs.

I would also like to know what kind of earth it is, and where in the UK you live."
 

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Not a yew!! It looks like a fir or spruce to me. We have both on our property and the goats love to eat our evergreens and don't even consider nibbling the yews. We're slowly getting them cut down anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Got half an answer: "Is there no photo of the entire plant? I THINK it is a normal spruce, but I need a picture of the whole plant, where I can se both the trunk and the twigs.

I would also like to know what kind of earth it is, and where in the UK you live."
Hi! Thanks for your help. I'm sending more pictures now. As you can see, the first one is so overgrown that I couldn't even see the bark, so I took the one next to it.
Im really not a gardener, so I couldn't tell you about the earth. I never looked at these things twice before the goats sorry.
I live on the Isle of Man, but nobody has ever heard of it

Thank you for your help again :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the help everyone :) I definitely hope it’s not a yew it would be weird for someone to plant one right next to a field that’s been used for sheep since the beginning of time.
 

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I've always been taught the trick that firs have flat needles. That looks like a fir. ("Friendly fir"- you can shake it's hand/branches without ouches). Actually, I first learned that in Scotland! And I've been to your Isle. :)
 

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Isle of Man - I THINK it is in the Irish sea? :)

Answer from my friend:

"Looks mostly like a damaged Abes relative. Not yew! The damage seems to depend on a combination of fungus and insect attack. Probably it started because the tree has been relocated in a climatic zone where the tree did not thrive well. My suggestion is that you take that tree away, so that its neighburs do not get hurt from those fungi and insects. These Abes relatives are not the first hand choice to feed goats, because of their very high content of manganese (Mn), but not really toxic, in small quantities."

I got the impression that my friend suggests burning of the sick tree.
 

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Not a yew!! It looks like a fir or spruce to me. We have both on our property and the goats love to eat our evergreens and don't even consider nibbling the yews. We're slowly getting them cut down anyway.
Why cut them down? These are a sign of a good forest, as ive only seen them deep in a forest where there is shade. If it is such a concern, cut off the lower branches which the goats could eat and burn them or something. No need to cut down such a lovely tree, they are a rare tree which we highly prize! I know where most of them are on our property and i often point it out to new people. Please no war on trees!
 

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Why cut them down? These are a sign of a good forest, as ive only seen them deep in a forest where there is shade. If it is such a concern, cut off the lower branches which the goats could eat and burn them or something. No need to cut down such a lovely tree, they are a rare tree which we highly prize! I know where most of them are on our property and i often point it out to new people. Please no war on trees!
Do you have it out for me for some reason? I don't have a war on trees; I'm a commercial organic farmer and permaculturist and don't appreciate assumptions made against me and my decisions.

Ours are highly toxic Japanese yews that are planted in the middle of grassy areas that we are cutting down. These are not a lovely tree, (not even a tree, maxing out at about 6'- about a goat's reach), and not at all rare. They are cheap, nursery stock foundation plantings.

Please don't suggest burning yew! They are extremely toxic and nobody should breath that smoke. Perhaps there's a native yew that is much less toxic but do take care suggesting burning.
 

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Do you have it out for me for some reason? I don't have a war on trees; I'm a commercial organic farmer and permaculturist and don't appreciate assumptions made against me and my decisions.

Ours are highly toxic Japanese yews that are planted in the middle of grassy areas that we are cutting down. These are not a lovely tree, (not even a tree, maxing out at about 6'- about a goat's reach), and not at all rare. They are cheap, nursery stock foundation plantings.

Please don't suggest burning yew! They are extremely toxic and nobody should breath that smoke. Perhaps there's a native yew that is much less toxic but do take care suggesting burning.
Yea sorry for the assumption. I was imagining a tree deep in a forest, and you going out of your way to target it.

so yours were planted by the previous owner?

the tree you are describing sound way different than the ones i have up here...

what are some other ways you would suggest people avoid there animals from not eating the branches? bury them perhaps?
 

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The animals will probably not eat a sick tree, but the insects and/or fungi that have infected it, should not be allowed to infect another tree, that is still in good health.
 
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