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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, tomorrow we are going to go and pick up our first doelings! Finally! My question is when we get home should we leave them alone to get adjusted to their surroundings or can we shower them with love and affection to help them get over their separation sadness? Also is there anything I should do to make this the least stressful possible? I saw on the back of the Power Punch bottle that you can give that to them during move. I know that moving can sometimes cause health issues to crop up. Is there anything like that that I should do proactively or would it be better to wait for dings of a problem? Also because diet changes are such a big deal how do I handle the fact that my pasture is very different from what they have been on?
 

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Woohoo! Congrats in your first doelings! If they want love, shower them with love! If they are more skittish, I would just leave them alone for a day or so, aside from feeding and basic checks to make sure they have no problems and are adjusting well. After that is they aren't very social, you could start to socialize them. For the diet change, if you have an area to keep them separated from the pasture I would keep them in there for the first couple of days, bringing them out a few times a day to graze if that's what they want. Just try to do it so it's not a huge shock to their body. It should only take a day or 2 before you are probably safe to leave them out there fulltime to eat. Some get scours the first day or so, so I like to have electrolytes in their water for their first 24-48 hours or until it is cleared up. For making sure they are comfortable, just provide them with a shelter, safe to sleep and so they can get away from a situation if they get scared or stressed.
 

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Well, tomorrow we are going to go and pick up our first doelings! Finally! My question is when we get home should we leave them alone to get adjusted to their surroundings or can we shower them with love and affection to help them get over their separation sadness? Also is there anything I should do to make this the least stressful possible? I saw on the back of the Power Punch bottle that you can give that to them during move. I know that moving can sometimes cause health issues to crop up. Is there anything like that that I should do proactively or would it be better to wait for dings of a problem? Also because diet changes are such a big deal how do I handle the fact that my pasture is very different from what they have been on?
First of all, welcome to the world of goats! Now....Not Power Punch. Probios. You want to give them Probios during any move or time of stress. Probios really helps with the diet change, preventing problems and health issues that may arise in a new situation. As for separation sadness and affection -- let the goats' behavior decide that. If they are skittish and don't want to be around you, give them time to gain their trust. If they are interested in you, go ahead and love on them! But don't do anything they don't want you to do.

You are going to love owning goats, and I can already tell you are going to be a caring owner!
 

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Woohoo! Congrats in your first doelings! If they want love, shower them with love! If they are more skittish, I would just leave them alone for a day or so, aside from feeding and basic checks to make sure they have no problems and are adjusting well. After that is they aren't very social, you could start to socialize them. For the diet change, if you have an area to keep them separated from the pasture I would keep them in there for the first couple of days, bringing them out a few times a day to graze if that's what they want. Just try to do it so it's not a huge shock to their body. It should only take a day or 2 before you are probably safe to leave them out there fulltime to eat. Some get scours the first day or so, so I like to have electrolytes in their water for their first 24-48 hours or until it is cleared up. For making sure they are comfortable, just provide them with a shelter, safe to sleep and so they can get away from a situation if they get scared or stressed.
I wouldn't keep them off pasture, I think that would be more stressful. A good dose of Probios will prevent scours and rough changes to pasture.
 

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I wouldn't keep them off pasture, I think that would be more stressful. A good dose of Probios will prevent scours and rough changes to pasture.
Yes, that's true. I guess I was thinking about how my pasture is. I don't know their set up so a bit just guessing. My set up has a holding pen, it is like a large chicken coop. The shelter and about 1/4 acre of grassy, weedy area, so they can still eat but won't be overwhelmed by eating too much rich or unused too food. If you don't have a set up kinda similar to that then they should definitely be put on pasture so they don't go hungry. And yes ProBios are always great to have on hand!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a probiotic paste that is not probios (probiotic plus it's got a purple label) would that be the same? Or should I get some probios?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No it doesn't specifically have to be probios. But it should be labeled for ruminants, not horses.
Yeah it's labelled for goats. Also it actually won't be tomorrow when we get them as we had some car troubles taking longer to resolve than we thought, so it will probably be Friday or Saturday, but it could be a little later.
 

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Yeah it's labelled for goats. Also it actually won't be tomorrow when we get them as we had some car troubles taking longer to resolve than we thought, so it will probably be Friday or Saturday, but it could be a little later.
More time to get ready! If it's labeled for goats that's perfectly fine.

Sometimes it's easier if you bring it when you pick them up so the breeder or owner can administer it for you.
 
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