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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you teach your goats to keep their disputes away from you, the farmer?
Both my adult bucks caught on pretty quickly that if they bucked at their buddies next to me, that I did not tolerate that. I grab their horns and force them on the ground, hold them there for a bit, and the lesson is done. It’s just a reminder where I stand. But one of my wethered kids does not seem to get it. He often will wield his horns around when I come to give him and his brother anything, treats, love... He bucks at him, but too close to me. Any teaching tricks that have worked for you? Thanks for any hints!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He does respond to it for the moment, but the behaviour happens again on another day.
I will try a spray gun, as GoatRocks suggested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I should add that this wether has a retained testis. He is acting very much like a buck. He has a rougher path than his cute little brother, who gets to eat alongside his Daddy. That’s the three of them on our avatar picture. Jersey, the white and black one of the left is the rough little guy that needs tracing in respect.
The black guy next to him is Coco, who is sweet as can be. In the back is Momo, the dad.
 

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I'd get that retained testicle removed as soon as possible. I'm not sure about goats, but with horses, cryptorchid stallions display more overt aggression and sexual drive than normal stallions. Not only does this make them more dangerous, but often they can actually still breed, and since cryptorchidism is dominant, the unfortunate trait is likely to pass to his offspring.

I'm not a fan of grabbing horns. It works on some goats, but on many goats it actually causes the bad behavior to escalate. At some point, your goat will be big and strong enough to win a hand-to-horn battle, so this is a road you really don't want to go down. Squirt bottles and riding crops can be very handy for correction as Goats Rock suggested. These are my favorite go-to's. Goats are never allowed to fight near people. If goats start misbehaving toward me or around me, I like to run toward them and shout, wave my arms, clap, stomp, or whatever else will scare the pants off them. If I have a squirt bottle or riding crop handy I'll use it. I want that goat to be terrified of me in that moment. He should run the other direction with his tail tucked into his butt cheeks.

If he turns around with his hair up and a challenge in his eyes, I go after him again. I do not corner him (this will make him turn and fight you). I want him to run away and be able to get away. Then I turn my back on him and walk away like he's not important. Don't go after him and try to make friends. He's scared of you in that moment and if you keep approaching him when he's trying to get away he will think you're picking a fight and he'll eventually turn on you again in self-defense. You can make friends later when he's in a gentle and submissive mood. I find it's much easier to win over a nervous goat than battle an aggressive one. If your goat approaches you with gentle eyes and a submissive posture, pet him and make a fuss over him. He should soon learn that getting loves and scratches is much better than getting shouted at and chased!

Good luck!
 

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A short, stiff whip used while riding horses. Usually it has some sort of leather on the end to slap together and make a loud noise.
Oh! :funnytech: And I was wondering how one could ever mount and ride on the back of wheat, maize or other crops ...

With this clear, I might as well repeat that pain will make a buck start fighting, rather than stop.
 

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It's not so much the pain a riding crop administers as it is the loud crack. I swat the wall or my leg (if wearing tall snow boots) and make a loud slap. It gets their attention. Rarely do I actually hit a goat. And then it would usually be a rutting buck that forgets that I am not a doe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank for all your advice!
 

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Depending on the level of the offense, I'm not against hitting a goat hard with a riding crop to the point where it gives him a good, sharp sting. The nice thing about a riding crop is that while it can deliver a very sharp sting if you swat hard, you can't actually injure him with it like you could with a stick. Once the goat has a healthy fear of that riding crop, all I usually have to do is slap it on my leg or against the gate to make everyone step back. Soon all I have to do is carry it, and before long I don't even have to do that any more.

You don't want to hit your goat so hard he becomes afraid of you. You need to instill enough fear that he will run from you in that moment, but not so much that he hides the next time you come in the pen. You have to think like a goat and treat him the way a senior goat would treat a disrespectful young upstart. A good herd leader can smack very hard, but if the other goat runs away he doesn't pursue. If the younger goat turns and challenges, the leader not only pursues but will usually mop the ground with the little stinker until he's made his point. Once the fight is won, all grudges are forgotten and the younger goat is usually allowed to come eat at the feeder as long as he's not challenging the leader or abusing his herd mates.
 
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