The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys!
As a kid, my family raised goats. We always had them in pasture but they loved to rummage around in the woods.

My husband and I would like to get two pet goats, but our home is up on a mountain and the acreage is primarily wooded. We wouldn't have any ability to clear for pasture.
My question is, would we be able to keep two healthy, happy goats in a wooded area? How would I need to supplement their feed?
Also sorta off topic, how do goats and chickens do together? I have silkies that I am obsessed with, but I could see a goat trying to get a taste of their fluff or trying to stomp all over them.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
59,770 Posts
Goats are browsers so they would love the woods. The big thing would be keeping predators out. You'd probably want to have a good shelter that you can lock them up in and have the shelter in a clear area. Chickens and goats can be in the same area but I would be concerned about the Silkies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
615 Posts
Our goats are in an area that is kinda half woody half open. They do fine, however y’all will have to keep on top of any dead trees. Dead trees can easily pull down a fence or hit a goat. We have to cut a few trees every hurricane season. Keep the stumps for a goat playground though. We have goats and chickens together. They do fine, the only issue is the goats constantly trying to break into the pens and steal chicken food when the chickens are up in the pens. The only time we have trouble with chickens getting run over are if the goats stampede for some reason. We have 9 though so it’s more of a deal than just a few would be. I have yet to have a goat even acknowledge the chickens other than if a chicken starts pecking them. The chickens sometimes use the goats as rides too which is always fun to watch.
 

·
Registered
Kinder Goat Breeder
Joined
·
4,285 Posts
I keep my goats in the woods and they absolutely love it. I do give mine hay because they have eaten the pasture down to almost nothing, but if your brush is diverse and plentiful enough you might be able to get away without feeding hay in the summer, but goats are set up for their diets to be 60% brush 40% grass so that's something to keep in mind. You will definitely need hay in winter when there's nothing for them to eat. Whether or not you will need to add grain or pelleted feed to their diet will depend greatly on age, gender, and body condition of your individuals. They will need free choice loose minerals and as you most certainly know access to fresh water. ;) Make sure you don't have any poisonous plant in your pasture. Rhododendron and mountain laurel would be big ones to look out for.

I also keep chickens with my goats and yes, you must keep the goats from getting into the chicken food. I have a board across the door of my chicken shed with a small gap at the bottom to let the chickens through, but to keep the goats out. I don't really enjoy having chickens in with my goats because chickens are messy with their poops and I don't like gross chicken poop all over the place where my goats sleep. This is why I have my chicken shed pretty much as far away from my goat barn as possible. They are on opposite ends of the pasture so the chickens aren't constantly going and hanging out in the goat barn. I also don't like how in one of my barns the chickens dust bathe and make giant holes in the floor. But, my goats have never hurt a chicken and I don't think they really would.

Good luck with your goat adventure, they sure are a lot of fun.
 

·
Fair-Haven
Joined
·
4,822 Posts
You will have to try to identify any potential poisonous plants in the wooded area. Otherwise they will love it. You do have to have a nice dry shelter, and of course good quality hay for winter along with free choice loose minerals. Keep goats away from chicken feed always.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,932 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Watch for downed trees and stumps near the fences, goats will use this as a booster to escape.
Otherwise, woods are goat heaven.
A good shed with covered access to put feed pans, loose minerals, and a dry sleeping area (bonus points if it's a bit elevated). Full access to water and a place to pen them up/shut them in or possibly isolate one. I feed according to weight, general size and breeding/pregnancy/life stage.
My main herd right now is not getting any feed or hay, just minerals and pasture/forage. A bunch of wethers, with ample forage, should be fine without feed until things freeze. Once the forage loses nutritional value you will need to feed hay and/or other feed. You need to look at their condition and adjust as needed.
Goats get along fine with chickens but, as everyone pointed out, they are devils about getting into chicken feed/scratch. And rubbing on/climbing on your chicken coops & nest boxes, turning things over and general mayhem... My chickens are allowed to get into the goats area but the goats are NOT allowed into the chicken area.
Goats will also work very hard to get into and eat dog food, cat food, horse feed, any grain/vegetation around.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top