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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. So I know someone on here recommended kelp for wethers to help prevent UC? I’m guessing this is because of the sheer amount of calcium in it. I just wanted advice on the minerals from the kelp in the picture. Is this too much when compared to the phosphorus?
Currently my pets are having a balanced feed (like 2.2 calcium to 1 phosphorus)
No loose minerals here so I’m doing this to ensure they get their minerals, particularly in winter.
Would the kelp help prevent any problems? Or is the calcium too much?
Thanks everyone. Also for anyone who uses this, how much do you feed?
 

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Are you in a country that doesn't have loose minerals for goats? We actually give kelp for the iodine. It is good that it has more calcium than phosphorus but the amount that is truly eaten isn't enough to really throw off the balance of the whole diet. Kelp doesn't have enough of minerals and vitamins to replace a goat mineral.
 

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Hi there, it was probably me! Resident wether lady!

@ksalvagno apologies but you are incorrect, kelp does alter the calcium:phosphorus ratio just enough :) it's a useful balance tool.

You do need loose minerals, choose one with a 2:1 calcium to phosphorus ratio.

Kelp is NOT a replacement for loose minerals. It's an iodine and calcium supplement.

It is free choice, though.

I need to know what else you are feeding (everything!!) and your water source to help balance the diet, you can do it yourself by reading this link:

https://thegivinggoat.home.blog/2020/08/18/diets-for-male-goats-how-to-prevent-urinary-calculi/
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi there, it was probably me! Resident wether lady!

@ksalvagno apologies but you are incorrect, kelp does alter the calcium:phosphorus ratio just enough :) it's a useful balance tool.

You do need loose minerals, choose one with a 2:1 calcium to phosphorus ratio.

Kelp is NOT a replacement for loose minerals. It's an iodine and calcium supplement.

It is free choice, though.

I need to know what else you are feeding (everything!!) and your water source to help balance the diet, you can do it yourself by reading this link:

https://thegivinggoat.home.blog/2020/08/18/diets-for-male-goats-how-to-prevent-urinary-calculi/
yes, I think it was you

Unfortunately there aren't any loose minerals in my country. I wish I could get some, my American friends has offered to send a few, but this really wouldn't be feasible in the long run and would cost him too much money imo.
The people I've encountered in the UK mainly say they just use feed and hay, but I'm not sure what the agreed upon diet is here

I did want to find out if the kelp would put their calcium up and how much to feed, but if you have any advice on food please let me know. The second picture is the feed I use, which is pretty popular in the UK, and the first (the goat nutrition one) is a type of mineral I found while googling. It doesn't seem to be like US minerals as it's recommended only 15g be fed per day. If it's not too much trouble, I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts about the minerals in the feed/uk mineral and if feeding that would help, as well as the kelp. Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What type of hay?

What is your water source like? Well water? Is it hard? High calcium (leaves white residue and deposits?)
the hay is just regular grass. I make sure to get hay that hasn't been fertilised by chickens though. It's just regular water here, not hard. Pretty sure it's soft/medium.
 
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