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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

I have two batches of kids... one is just at one month, the other batch is about 3 weeks. Neither have shown interest in grain very much yet. I started pulling the kids at night and putting them together in their own stall with a small container of grain, but 9 times out of 10 when I go let them out in the AM the grain is still in there.
I've tried feeding them at the same time as their moms, but the does are such grain hogs that they don't let the babies near the grain.

Any thoughts, tips, suggestions? Is this normal?

Also - One of the bucklings out of a triplet birth is rather skinny. We've been letting him nurse exclusively in the AM and the PM, and he's put on weight but not as much as I would like to see. What do you suggest , considering he isn't eating any grain or much hay at this point?

Thanks!
 

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It’s not uncommon for the third to grow slower then the other two. Definitely get a fecal ran to be on the safe side, he’s already getting the crap end of the deal with moms milk so you dont want anything else that works against the little guy gaining weight. You can try a bottle but try not to get discouraged if he doesn’t take it. That’s part of the reason why I really detest more then 2, by the time you can really see one is behind it’s so imprinted on his dam they usually won’t take a bottle. But keep trying. If he flat out refuses it’s not the end of the world, when he starts eating grain he should start to catch up more, also siblings will eat grain and should give him more of a chance for milk.
For the grain I agree with salteylove. Even at weaning time when kids know how to eat hay and grain, 5 minutes after forcing them away from mom they scream rather then eat. A creep feeder is the best invention ever! It’s on their terms, which goats like, so more willing to try new things. One thing that I have figured out on getting them to go in and check things out is to hang a light in the creep feeder. With it all bright in that area at night they can’t help but go in and see what’s up in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are they stressed when stalled separately? A "creep feeder" (even if the grain isn't free choice) that they can access at will rather than a forced separation may work better.

For the thin buckling - have they had coccidia prevention?
They don't seem stressed at all. They cry a bit but they settle down.

I have not done coccidia prevention - My vet said that unless I see any signs of being unthrifty , aside from his weight since it was obvious he was the low man on the totem pole, then I could just monitor and treat if needed. Do you recommend proactively treating them ? We use corid here.

Do you have a photo or a link to a creep feeder you recommend?
 

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I recommend coccidia treatment in a preventative manner whenever breeders have at least three does producing kids. Once you've got 5+ kids on the ground, I feel it's a good measure.

I'm extremely surprised the 2-4 week old kids are not eating a pan of grain when stalled overnight and not exhibiting stress from the separation. No suggestions, just surprised!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I recommend coccidia treatment in a preventative manner whenever breeders have at least three does producing kids. Once you've got 5+ kids on the ground, I feel it's a good measure.

I'm extremely surprised the 2-4 week old kids are not eating a pan of grain when stalled overnight and not exhibiting stress from the separation. No suggestions, just surprised!
I may monitor since we are right at 5, with two does. They have a pretty nice sized barn to themselves and spend all day on the pasture.
I know, I was surprised too!
 

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I always keep a separate feeder for the kids down low from mama to begin with when they are stalled with her. I also will do a co-parenting - offering bottles for kids when there are more than two - I do start from birth tho. I would try to get them their own feeder when you feed mama. They tend to mimic behaviors.
 

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I agree about a fecal - coccidiosis is a problem for a lot of people right now. We do preventative treatment about every 3-4 weeks on our kids when they are young, then check fecals when they are a little older. Have a doe turning 5 months old that has looked scrawny and a bit sunken in lately, and she had enough cocci in her fecal that I felt she needed to be treated and I think it may be helping.
There always seems to be one triplet that doesn't grow quiet as well as the other 2 as others have said.

As for feeding, unless you are milking the mom's I would not separate them. Instead, I would definitely make a creep feeder. We've had some kids eat a little feed at 4 weeks, but honestly, with our Boer kids, I don't see them eating much other than nibbling until about 5-6 weeks old. We've had a creep feeder for the 4 May born kids for about a week and a half and I'd put a handful of feed, and basically have to toss it the next day. In about the last 3 days they are starting to eat, and when they start, then I increase. Last night I put down almost 1/2lb. and they had it cleared out this morning. Now this is in the barn. Out in the day time pen we have a creep feeder and we put a few pounds in it. I don't know what the babies are eating out there because they share the creep feeder with a few January born does. But creep feeding is absolutely the way to go if you want your kids to grow well. Along with cocci prevention or regular fecal checks. Especially this time of year.
 
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