Kikos

Discussion in 'Meat Market' started by Dover Farms, Nov 1, 2007.

  1. Dover Farms

    Dover Farms New Member

    Oct 16, 2007
    NW Ohio
    Kikos are a very hardy and parasite resistant breed. Developed in New Zealand. The person who bred the Kiko took the biggest New Zealand Feral does he could find and bred them to the larger dairy bucks like Alpines, Nubians, and Saanens. Then they were carefully selected for their hardiness and better milk production and bred to others alike. That's how Kikos originated in a nut shell. Kikos aren't quite as meaty as Boers and Myotonics, especially in the thighs. But there are some Kikos out there that are just as meaty. They have a higher meat to bone ration than Boers.
     
  2. lacy_94

    lacy_94 Guest

    192
    Oct 6, 2007

  3. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) Guest

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
    The kikos have the higher ratio because they have smaller bones. The boers are very big boned. This spring we will have our first fullblood kiko kids. I'm very interested to see the weights.
     
  4. Dover Farms

    Dover Farms New Member

    Oct 16, 2007
    NW Ohio
    lacy_94,

    I really can't see him to well in that pic. Although, since his head is all white...maybe Saanen? Do you have a body shot of him? Does he have horns? Kikos usually have very distinct horns that spiral outward.

    Julie,

    I hope your Kikos perform very well for you! :D You may have already read this on another post, but since we cannot afford buying new bucks of both Nubians and Kikos every few years, we are going to soley focus on our Nubians...
     
  5. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    I am adding a Kiko/Spanish doe to my herd tomorrow! I am very excited to see what she produces crossed to my myotonic buck.
     
  6. getchagoat (Julie)

    getchagoat (Julie) Guest

    603
    Oct 5, 2007
    congrats. Kiko/Spanish makes for good moms. Guy at Tennessee State University did a study between kiko, boer, and spanish moms. I'd love to have Spanish crossed with anything. We have one.
     
  7. alyssa_romine

    alyssa_romine Breaking Dawn Ranch

    Oct 4, 2007
    arkansas
    I am so glad to hear that. I guess I made a good decision on that doe.
     
  8. dvfreelancer

    dvfreelancer New Member

    192
    Aug 15, 2009
    One of my neighbors has a Kiko buck. Looks like he's got some size on him.

    Wicked set of horns on Kikos.
     
  9. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    Does Sydell make a goat flopper that is extra wide at the top so that the Kikos will fit? :ROFL: We cross our boer billies with a lot of cross-bred goats and they make the VERY BEST show wethers. Boer/Alpy and Boer/Nuby are the best with Boer/Kiko right behind them.
     
  10. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    i had a kiko/boer once and she was great. good mom and never let her kids leave. ;)
     
  11. DPW

    DPW New Member

    92
    Mar 13, 2010
    Crow, Oregon.
    Have been toying with the idea of adding some Kiko blood into our herd for some time now. The traits associated with Kiko's interested me very much. A friend of ours just happened to have a four month old buckling that was a 50-50 Boer/Kiko cross.
    She was going to sell him for meat so when we expressed interest she practically gave him to us.
    Mostly dirty white with some brown down his back and around his neck. Not a very "handsome" fellow coloration wise but at this young age has the potential to have it where it counts for a meat production buck.
    We're pretty excited to see how he turns out. The buck we have now, fullblood Boer, grew into nothing like his sire. We were a bit dissapointed to say the least. We bought him at four months as well but paid a substantial more amount of money.
    As of now we have 4 Boer/Nubian cross does we need to cull for one reason or another so I am keeping my eye out for a nice Kiko doe or two to help fill the void.
    Here's one of many articles I have read about Kiko's that helped nudge me in that direction.

    http://www.kikogoats.info/articles/My%2 ... ation.html
     
  12. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    There is a kiko round up this weekend June 10-12 at the Georgia National Fairgrounds. Sell starts Sat. at 12:30. You can go to www.southeastkikoroundupsale.com for more info. They also have an online catalog listing the animals that will be for sale.

    Gina
     
  13. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    I loooooove kikos :) I got a 6month old that's possibly bred (the guy traded her to us, she's pretty good sized, I figure for having raised them for 11 years he knows what he's doing), so with luck, she'll give us a fullblooded off spring, if not, I got a kIko/boer male (Sunny), he's taken up a lot of the kiko trait, but you can tell he has boer in him. I'll breed them together if she doesn't show signs. She's lovely.. I'll look for pics :D I have mountains of pictures of my farm.
     
  14. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Re:

    This is personally my favorite cross for meat production... don't know why more people don't breed the kiko/myo crosses.

    Obviously this depends on the quality of your myo buck... but you have everything from this cross that you can possibly want... greater meat to bone ratio coming from both breeds, great mothers from both breeds, production of multiples that are dam raised from the myos, Ease of kidding from the myos and the color variety, possibility for blue eyes and polled from the myos.... the positives to this cross are endless.... the problem would only be making sure you have a quality myotonic buck to breed to kiko does... there is such a large variety of size in the myotonic breed that you really need a good solid buck preferably one whose lineage can be tracked (by photos would be best)so you know that you are getting a buck from heavy meat lines NOT from the mini pet lines. :)
     
  15. Lexibot

    Lexibot New Member

    326
    Jul 27, 2010
    Missouri
    Is there any pics of the myo? I would like to see ;)
     
  16. Re: Re:


    Personally, I loved the kids of this crossing as well. However, I was not to fond of the upkeep on the does after kidding. I do not like my does loosing any weight and if they do very little is allowed. My kiko does seemed to just look so dairy during and after kidding. Big bags that caused the sink in look. Also, the nice nice ones I did want want to go to meat. So you had to find a meat breeder wanting that cross. It became too much for me that is why I went to the TMG genetics this year when I got rid of my meat does. Just my feelings.
     
  17. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    I have three boer/kiko cross doelings who just turned a year old. They are the most maintenance free babies we raised. The boers seemed to get the worms and come down with the occasional cold. The two does we lost were boers (both had severe worm infestation when we got them and the doctoring didn't work). I do love our boer/kiko girls. They are much lighter boned than the boer babies were but as yearlings they are starting to fill out and pack on some muscling (even while pregnant). We've had no worm issues with them at all and they've all been wormed twice...once when we got them and once in the middle of summer as precaution. Very healthy girls!
     
  18. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    I have a kiko doe and her July 2010 boer doe - she looks just like mama other than color.
    I don't know anything about kiko's. What kind of build do they have compared to a boer or a dairy such as a nubian? I know boers are thick, and nubian's are much slender. But I am uncertain what a kiko should be like? My doe just seems...thin even though she has a good sized preggo belly and due any day. I just don't know what kind of build she should have. But then I was told she probably has some dairy in her too...
     
  19. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    I'm no expert, but the kiko is supposed to be a pretty big meat goat...smaller than a boer in muscling but larger than a nubian for sure in muscling. The best touted features about them is that they are supposed to be very resistant to parasites, their kids are born with more vigor and grow at a more rapid rate than boers (though the boers are always bigger anyway), and do extremely well on browse only.
    I imagine when they become more popular and modernized they will loose their "wild" vigor. I think the boer/kiko cross can be exceptional. My boki girls are smaller framed but extremely healthy. They "take a lickin and keep on tickin" :laugh: One is obviously more kiko and a smaller one at that. We plan to cull her once she has weaned off her baby. We are going to look at another boki doeling tomorrow. In the southeast parasites are tough to manage in boers especially, so a little kiko blood thrown in the mix can only help imo (if commercial and obviously not for registered stock and show).
    I think my blk/wht paint buckling is part kiko. His horns (need to upload a frontal shot) look identical to the young kiko buck and he's got that same knot on his forehead, no roman nose.
     
  20. HoosierShadow

    HoosierShadow Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    Central Kentucky
    Thanks Aimee! My doe isn't heavy or meaty, but she had twins in July, and then was rebred at the end of Sept so she really never had a chance to regain herself. I didn't want her bred but had no idea she was coming in heat and the buck got to her before I did. Out of all my girls she is the only one I didn't know was coming in heat and she was the one I didn't want bred. figures! So she's getting a break after this kidding.
    Her July doe has never had any issues that I can think of, no hoof problems. She's on the small side- short but chunky. She still has a lot of growing to do. But her mama has grown a lot in the last several months as well.
    Now that I know they are meaty, but not as muscled as Boers, I can work on getting weight back on her.

    The sad thing about it is, her daughter is going to be registered as 50% whenever I send her paperwork in, but she doesn't look boer at all...nothing about her IMO looks boer.