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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we are going to move to Washington state in a few months and thinking about adding some cashmere goats to our herd of milking alpines. We have always been in hot areas so I didn't feel right getting goats with heavy coats but now see the opportunity!

I understand the shearing process and read up washing the fiber but how difficult is it to take the sheared coat and say create a scarf out of it? Sorry if a stupid question but just curious if there might be a sight that is more dedicated to the equipment like looms and spinners out there.
 

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Not a stupid question at all. Some good people to talk to would be the folks at Goat Knoll. I believe they used to shear and she has created things from it. Most of the people I know and have talked to send their fleeces off to a processor to get deviated and cleaned and either get it made into rovings or into yarn.

Lucky for you there are a lot of cashmere breeders in Washington down to California :)

Where in Washington are you moving?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not a stupid question at all. Some good people to talk to would be the folks at Goat Knoll. I believe they used to shear and she has created things from it. Most of the people I know and have talked to send their fleeces off to a processor to get deviated and cleaned and either get it made into rovings or into yarn. Lucky for you there are a lot of cashmere breeders in Washington down to California :) Where in Washington are you moving?
Thanks for the info...right now we are looking at maybe south near Tacoma or way up north on the island above brain bridge in Kingston. ..trying to determine what location will be he most goat friendly
 

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Eastern WA is nice, and goat friendly ;)
 

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I know some people that don't shear their goats but comb out the fibers. This means there are less guard hairs and it's easier for them to process. If you shear you need a processor that removes guard hairs from the softer good stuff. Once you have fiber that's usable, just spin it and then you can make a scarf.

Do you know how to spin yarn? knit/crochet/weave? Are you thinking of making items by way of a business or for self use? I don't know the goat end of the cashemere business well but I am quite familiar with the fiber/spin/knit end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I know some people that don't shear their goats but comb out the fibers. This means there are less guard hairs and it's easier for them to process. If you shear you need a processor that removes guard hairs from the softer good stuff. Once you have fiber that's usable, just spin it and then you can make a scarf. Do you know how to spin yarn? knit/crochet/weave? Are you thinking of making items by way of a business or for self use? I don't know the goat end of the cashemere business well but I am quite familiar with the fiber/spin/knit end.
I work full time but my side business is goat milks soap as we currently own a small alpine herd. My mother in law is a master when it comes to knitting and always wants to teach me how to do it...I am really just wanting to get into it so I can create a scarf or 2 or maybe even a nice throw blanket.
 

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I would start with going to a wool festival or buying some fleece from someone and seeing if you like working with it first.

Having just a small batch of fleece processed by a mill can get expensive.
 

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Have you considered Angoras, Pygoras, Nigoras? They aren't Cashmere but they're really nice and produce fibers that are worth spinning and knitting with a little less work that Cashmere. I process through many fleeces a year of all kinds and I wouldn't hand process a sheared Cashmere. Separating guard hairs from the good stuff is a pain in the tush.

But, take a look around, contact some mills and see what they charge, it might be worth it to you. Make sure they know that you need a dehairer - not all mills will do that.
 

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So we are going to move to Washington state in a few months and thinking about adding some cashmere goats to our herd of milking alpines. We have always been in hot areas so I didn't feel right getting goats with heavy coats but now see the opportunity!

I understand the shearing process and read up washing the fiber but how difficult is it to take the sheared coat and say create a scarf out of it? Sorry if a stupid question but just curious if there might be a sight that is more dedicated to the equipment like looms and spinners out there.
You are moving to the land of PYGORA goats, a breed developed in Oregon..and there are many breeders in the area you are moving to. Pygoras are sturdy and have a lovely disposition.

Just do an online search for "how to work with Pygora fiber" and you should find a ton of information. You can easily spin enough pygora yarn on a simple drop spindle to knit or crochet a variety of things. I spun the yarn and crocheted a baby cap in under 3 hours - raw fleece to completed cap.
 

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Washington and Oregon are a Pygora wonderland! And the fiber is just .... like Godiva chocolate to a chocolate lover.... but... I would recommend washing the fiber yourself then sending it off to be de-haired. It's pennies on the dollar to have it carded into roving as long as they have it already... then you have exotic fiber that goes for $8 an oz. Cloud roving around here... if not more if your inventory is limited and you are internet savvy. Just saying....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nice info.. I usually hang out in the dairy section because that's all we have had but think I found a new cool spot! We got to seattle today to look for houses, looking around port orchard for work commute..sounds like its bout time to start looking for pygora breeders also
 
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