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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are three Lamancha does for sale. These girls look like they are slick and healthy and they are a pretty reasonable price. I want to make cheese and Lamanchas are good milkers from what I hear. Also I have a coulple Nigi bucks who could probably make some kids with these gals. I have no experience w/ the Lamancha breed so I was hoping somebody here might be able to lend an opinion. So... what do you think?





p.s. Im waiting to find out how old they are and if they're bred
 

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they look like they are decent does. ai dont like horns at all though. i would say they are yearlings. judging by the horn growth and depth of body. So two year olds next spring, ready to breed in the fall. Do you know anything about their dams production? their sires dams production? do they have any older sisters in milk?
beth
 

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Ditto what Beth and Fritzie said, but before you decide you really need to decide if they are worth the trouble with the horns. Horns on a dairy animal are really not good and although LaManchas are sweet, they can be really mean to their herdmates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ill ask about production numbers. Horns dont bother me. They evolved with them, they live with them. Then again, Ive never had to deal with a puncture wound on an animal before. I DID catch one right on the face when I was moving a buckling, it hit about an inch below my eye. Didnt break the skin but it was a real wake-up moment.
 

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thats exactly why i dont like horns, even if the animal doesnt mean too, they move their heada certain way and you catch it in the face it hurts a lot. they can really hurt eachother get caught in fences and its really hard to find a milk stantion that will acomadate an animal with horns. plus if you ever decided you wanted to show youwouldnt be able. I know you said youre just interested in milk production, i hear a lot of people say that then they get bitten by the show bug.
beth
 

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Also another problem with the horns is that these are dairy goats. Unlike boer goat horns that curve back and around their heads, dairy goat horns grow strait up out of their heads then curve around. They get in the way a lot more than boers and cause more injury as well. We have had a few boers that did get their udders nicked up and it really isn't pretty or fun.
 

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plus you can't show a dairy goat with horns :wink: (if you ever thought of showing them)

however I wouldn't suggest dehorning them unless you want a really Big Deal on your hands - can show you pics etc of Demi's dehorning process if that helps! Plus you couldnt dehorn until after fly season anyway.

LW
 

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ditto, the horns dont bother me, and if they dont bother Alec, then I think they are a nice group, I particularly like the chocolate girl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
they are only 4 months old :( I wanted to breed them but thats just too young. No sense in buying them now and feeding them for half a year before I breed. Thanks for the help yall
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the tip Stacey. Ive never seperated bucks & does before (they were always pregnant or had just given birth) so it would be a challenge. Id have to keep them (the Lamancha does) penned up at all times OR rotate feeding times which isnt feasible. My herd relies almost 100% on forage and not grain/hay/etc so Id have to think the mechanics of this one through.

On the other hand, Id REALLY like to throw some mini Manchas :)
 

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its smart of you to not want to run the young does with the buck -- BUT if I were you I wouldnt run my buck all year long with my does period. Nigerian does can be bred all year round even when raising kids which can cause you to have kiddings back to back constantly with does which isnt healthy. Just a tidbit of information
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks! I agree that constant rebreeding is too hard on the girls and I dont want to do it. When I bought my second herd (8 Nigis...1 buck 1 buckling & 6 does) the girls were all already preggers so I just left the boys in with them. Once they kid Ill split everyone up. My electric fence is keeping them where they should be for now but Im not sure how it will hold them once the smell of love is in the air... Maybe I should do a test run now before its do-or-die time :idea:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
StaceyRoop said:
might not be a bad idea-- and if the boys stay put then you can get these new girls to run with your nigerian does :)
yeah that would be excellent, if everyone stayed where they were supposed to! Then again, if they did that, they wouldnt be goats lol. Ill never forget what one book said about goats: "Pick one place in your mind where you DONT want them to go. The goats WILL get out eventually and that is where you'll find them!"

Here is my setup. I have two separate areas, close to each other but not completely adjacent. They are separated by about 20 feet at the closest. Each has its own shelter and several paddocks. Both areas are contained by electric fence (11,000 volts, 1.5 joules. Its H O T H O T H O T!!!). In one area I have 2 females (mom and daughter) and 2 bucklings. The females are pregnant (< 1 month). In the other area I have 1 buck and 3 does, all pregnant, unknown due dates. They were pregnant when i got them, former owner has no idea when they got pregnant as they were a "wild" herd always with bucks. If they got pregnant the day before I bought them, they are due @ end of September.

Im thinking I put the Lamanchas in with the 3 does, move the buck to the other pen w/ the 2 does & 2 bucklings. He is really laid back, getting a little on in age (~ 6?) and I think he would be content with them.

Heres the problem: I let them out every day to forage and they are very social and mix immediately so the new does would get pregnant immediately. I already have 2 births set for Dec/Jan which Im not looking forward too and I dont want 3 more!!! Since I have to let them out to get sufficient food, maybe I can let out the 3 pregnant does and keep the 3 new girls in the pen and feed them w/ hay & grain. After two months, I can let them breed for a spring kidding.

Ideally I would just wait to buy them in the fall and not worry about it, but they are a good price and look like good girls and I dont want to pass this up. Im sure they'll go quickly if I dont get them and there arent many Lamanchas in this area.

What do you think Stacey?
 
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