Laziest Buck I've Even Seen

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by badnewsboers, May 28, 2009.

  1. badnewsboers

    badnewsboers New Member

    429
    May 9, 2008
    Newport, NC
    I swear I will never understand goats. Yesterday Ken, his wife and I drove 2 and a half hours to get some does bred. The buck we were planning on breeding two is the sire to two does we bought last year that are just tremendous does-structurally correct, wide, muscular and still feminine. He is a Ruger son and while not much to look at himself throws consistent goats that can compete with the top breeders in the state. The does we were taking to be bred were all Ken's. I had put a CIDR in one of mine at the same time as his three planning on bringing her up there but she ended up getting an infection and I had to pull the CIDR before it could do any good. We had CIDRS in Ken's does for 21 days and pulled them 24 hours before we would be at the other farm. When we got to the farm we tried putting the does in one at a time. It was obvious they were coming in but weren't in a raging heat yet. But most bucks still would have blubbered and pawed and acted a fool-helping them come in right? Not this buck. He took one sniff of each doe and laid down.

    We waited awhile but the buck was not interested-despite all the flagging the girls were doing. So the buck's owner Steve sent his son to get another buck hoping competition would get the first buck moving. Even after the two bucks were put in with each other and allowed to spar a bit-the first buck when put in with the does again just laid down again. THe other buck however cleared the fence to get in with them-so we had to go lock him up. After standing around for a while longer Steve offered us the choice of leaving the does there or bringing the buck back with us. I mentioned I had one or two does I would like to breed to him back home but didn't CIDRS in them. He said he wasn't breeding to that buck this year, he was trying new blood, and didn't need him back right away. Ken was a bit hesitant because he was afraid of being responsible if something happened to that buck. Steve said he trusted us and said what happens happens. He'd lost a few bucks to freak occurrences and knew how finicky goats could be.

    Finally we decided to take the buck back with us. We loaded the goats in the trailor and Rudy laid down and started eating the pellets we had in there for the does. He's lazy and gluttonous. So Rudy (the buck) should be with us for about 3 weeks. Hopefully he will do his job that time. His laziness has me a bit worried.
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Was he being fed ...show feed? Some show feeds ....have something in the feed to calm the bucks down ......and make them lazy.. :wink:
     

  3. badnewsboers

    badnewsboers New Member

    429
    May 9, 2008
    Newport, NC
    He was being fed this winter maintenance feed offered by a nearby breeder. He had more weight on him than the last time I saw him but was not overly fat like how you see much show goats-just in nice shape. He himself is not a show buck. :shrug:

    The owners said he as real mellow and not an aggressive breeder. He's supposed to be real gentle with does. It was just odd though. I know if I had thrown those does in with my buck Earl he would of been hollering, blubbering and chasing them around.
     
  4. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    How old.... is the buck that is Lazy?
     
  5. badnewsboers

    badnewsboers New Member

    429
    May 9, 2008
    Newport, NC
    Uh...maybe 2 or 3? He can't be that old since Ruger is only 4 years old.
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    so he isn't that old.....sometimes older bucks get a little lazy.....


    I did have a buck that was lazy in the day...but liked breeding at night.......it was probably because ....it was to hot for him during the day...... :shrug:
     
  7. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    What is "CIDRS"? Thanks ahead for the explanation!
     
  8. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    NIGHT RIDER!

    lol

    Honestly, I would be suspicious but not too worried. I had a buck once that would completely ignore the does, never saw him breed one. But 5 mths later kids everywhere. I figured he was joining them at night. Also I've had mostly bucks who hollar and blubber and paw and carry on, but also some that dont - are real quite, rub the doe once or twice then mount and go back to sleep. I've also had some bucks that refuse to perform when people are around. Stage fright.

    On the other had I've also had some bucks that I never saw breed, and turns out one was petrified of does, one had an abcess between the toes so it was painful to mount, one was sterile.

    So this is a difficult situation for you - you have to place your bets one way or another - if you take the chance he is a night rider, you run the risk of having your does turn up empty. If you turn him away in case there is a sterility or mounting problem, you need to find a different buck and lose access to his particular genetics.

    Tough call
     
  9. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    CIDR = controlled internal drug release

    Its a plastic device that is inserted into the doe's vagina and slowly releases progestogen. the mickey mouse of it is that the doe's body thinks she is pregnant so doesnt cycle while the cidr is in, upon removal of the cidr the body is kick started to cycle again - they usually come into heat between 24 and 48 hrs after cidr removal (I've seen them earlier and later than that)

    cidrs are fantastic things - I think I wrote a more detailed explanation once with pics and all, do a search for it :)
     
  10. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    Thank you Keren; fascinating!
     
  11. badnewsboers

    badnewsboers New Member

    429
    May 9, 2008
    Newport, NC
    Thanks Keren. I really am counting on this buck breeding these does. He is nothing much to look at but throws some amazing kids. The two we have at our farm out of him are our best does. He could really put us ahead.

    Another issue though is one of my does is being bullied bad by all the other does. Even the two her own age and size beat up on her. I was concerned how this bullying affects her chances of getting bred. She can't stay with the main group becuase the other does will not allow it. I've been considering putting her in with our buck Earl because he only has two young does with him now. Any thoughts would be appreciated.


    Ken'ss dad Ray claims he has seen the buck on two of the does. I still haven't seen him do anything. When Ken was out at the farm yesterday one if the does, 12, was pushing on him to make him get up. He finally got up and chased her a bit.

    I'm thinking the problem has been compounded by sore feet. He had some bad looking hooves. I noticed him limping yesterday so we caught him and trimmed his hooves.
     
  12. JK_Farms

    JK_Farms Well-Known Member

    Nov 11, 2016
    Tennessee
    This is a very old thread GoatGirlInTraining.
     
  13. GoatGirlInTraining

    GoatGirlInTraining Member

    226
    Mar 26, 2017
    thanks,sometimes i just follow to read it later.:)