Let's here from the Fiber Goat people!

Discussion in 'Fuzzy Fibers' started by MissMM, Dec 24, 2007.

  1. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    We need more postings from fiber goat people!!!!!

    How are your goats surviving the winter so far? I went through all the trouble of shoveling a path from the barn door to their outside toys (over a foot of snow so far) and they won't step a single hoof in the snow. They are getting so dirty from staying inside all the time....

    Does anybody have any winter care recommendations for Pygoras they'd like to share? Like tips for keeping their fleece clean?

    Thanks in advance - mmm
     
  2. rgbdab

    rgbdab New Member

    252
    Nov 26, 2007
    TEXAS
    Hi, I don't have fiber goats, but I am very interested in them. I have boers and it is hard for me to sell them for meat because I fall in love with each one. Fiber goats sound very interesting to me since they don't have to be killed to be productive for the owners bottom line. I live in Texas and it gets quite hot here in the summer and relatively mild winters. I have seen some info and it seems they can be either combed or shaved for their fiber. I don't have any answers for you, but I will be watching the post for info that hopefully someone on here has for you. Good Luck, D
     

  3. jBlaze

    jBlaze New Member

    254
    Oct 9, 2007
    Oregon
    Well, here is my update of my pygoras. I never did find the time to shear three of them, they look pretty ragged! (however you spell that - lol) The 5 that i did shear look great! Only one of them is really friendly, he is so soft and fun to touch. The others would rather not be touched but may let yo touch their nose. lol. Even in lots of fleece they are sure goats, the rain shall not touch them. THe alpacas and llamas will stay out in the rain and light snow, frost, as long as it in not windy they just stay out. It snowed here for Christmas yesterday. It didn't stick, but still neat for us. (Willemette Valley - Oregon)
    Ya, we need more folks to get some fuzzy goats. :D
     
  4. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    This is the hardest time for us. We have to lock them up because the snows blows in the barn, and the older ones bully the others out of the barn.
    For our Cashmere fiber, it is just really hard to keep clean. I though about it tonight with this storm that we are having right now, about putting goat coats on them to keep the straw out of the fiber and the hay. But if I did that it will cause the fiber to mat, and that will ruin the fiber. I have to say I believe they are all warm as ever, because of the fiber. Have you ever worn a Cashmere a sweater? They are hot as ever.
    I was a little worried about my buck, he was shaking because it is so cold here, and I had not had a chance to clean his barn, but today I was able to clean the barn and bed it back down with fresh warm straw.
     
  5. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    I'm very lucky to have a barn w/indoor pen & sliding door to their paddock. I'll open the door just wide enough from them to get through. All they'll do is look outside. The barn isn't heated, but the kids seem to be doing ok.

    My goats are lap goats so far & all get along perfectly. Except when they're vying for cookies.

    I brush them as often as I can to prevent mats, but they're hay dust & gunk all over in their fleece that brushing doesn't get rid of.
     
  6. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I also have indoor stall. I Have a rather large barn, (because we have added on to it 4 times). I am able to lock mine up in stalls but I don't like to do that right now because they are all pregnant and they need to move around. So for now I have some of the goats locked in one are and the bullies in another area.
    Miss MM, I wish I could comb mine. If I did that it would ruin the fiber. I am waiting until it starts to blow (come out), and then I will comb it and bag it for shows.
     
  7. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    How would it ruin the fleece, may I ask? Maybe I shouldn't be combing them, I new to all this stuff - but they look so darn cute afterwards. So clean and curly-Q locks that are soft as a cloud. I use my horse mane comb to work out any snarls & to prevent matting, then go back through with the undercoat comb. Hardly any fleece comes off, mainly just hay & junk. I have 2 type As, a B, and 2 type C's. The C's are a breeze to comb out, but the others..... it works when I only have 5, but when I have 40, I'm sure I'll change my mind about the grooming thing.
     
  8. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Well with the Cashmere it will straighten it out, and it will lose the crimp and style for the prime cashmere. We will just brush it out with our hands, and try to "shake" as much hay and stuff out of it. We use to use a blower to blow the hay and stuff out of the fiber before we combed them, but we noticed that also will straighten it just enough to really see it. So we wait until it is ready to come out and they we use a dog under coat brush and comb it out and just collect it for show. Now if you are not selling it for style and showing it then it really will not matter.
    Wow, you have 40 goats? Are you going to sheer them all? Do you do it yourself? or do you comb out those that you can?
     
  9. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    Oooops. I better clarify........ right now, I have 5 Pygora goats that are thus far, very spoiled lap goats. Hence the ability to groom them regularly. I hope to increase my herd to 40 within the next 2 years ( a combination of fiber, dairy and meat goats). A pipe dream, I'm thinking at this point, as I really don't see how I can give adequate attention to that many critters and still work full time for the "secure income."
     
  10. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I was wondering how you were able to spoil them all. I guess if I would of red the bottom of your posts, it says 5 Pygora goats.
    I have had several of those lap goats. For some reason this last years kidding they were not near as friendly as all the other years. My daughter and I were just talking about that last week. We use to have several goats that as soon as we went into the barn, they would come up to us for some loving and we would just sit in the pens and they would come get in out laps and go to sleep. We were at a show and we both had a year old doe in our laps, and people took pictures like crazy. They acted like they had never seen a goat like that. They all commented that who needs a lap dog when you can have a lap goat? I am really hoping that we have some friendlier babies this year. I think it has a LOT to do with the fact that we had so many babies that it is really hard to get that involved with so many babies. We have a lot of babies expected this year also. We are expecting 7 does to deliver twins for all of them but one. I would guess she will have only one because she is not real big, and she is a first timer, but we do have one that looks like she did when she had triplets.
     
  11. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    I'm excited for you. There won't be any babies around here until March of 2008 as mine are too young to be bred just yet. I might get more this summer, but am making myself go through a full winter, at least one round of shearing, and testing the market up here before I get more.

    Good luck to you during kidding season.
     
  12. artzkat

    artzkat Member

    123
    Oct 22, 2007
    West Virginia
    Pygoras outdoors

    Hi all..I am having an opposite problem with my 7 pygoras...The want to stay out in the WORST weather..as long as it is not raining or sleeting. They stayed out all night last week when the temp went down to 9 degrees with high winds. When I got them into the barn in the morning they were all covered with ice and just as happy as could be. Bright eyed and bouncing.
    They have 3 shelters to chose from - free choice hay, minerals, baking soda..all under cover -plus I even tried to make the barn more attractive to them with heated water buckets and lots of snuggly bedding...but they won't stay in the barn unless it is raining. When we had a 6 " snow they jumped around in it like puppies.
    This is not what I expected! They seem to be thriving..thick coats and bright eyes...but I'll check on them late at night and it is frigid outside and they are just lying in the middle of the field like it was summer.

    Today, we are having bizarre weather..temp 70 degrees (after the cold of last week) and they are panting. I am worried about them getting pneumonia from all this temperature shift. Is there something I should be doing as far as feeding them to help avoid peumonia?

    Kat C
     
  13. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    You could give them some Probios just to boost their immune system, but I wouldn't due anything else unless they started coughing, running a fever, or had runny noses (with cloudy discharge).

    good luck
     
  14. Di

    Di Crazy Goat Lady

    Jan 29, 2008
    central PA
    Well, my 3 Pygora girls are about the most friendly goats I've ever seen, they are such "girly girls" though. They haven't left the shed except to go in the barn for weeks. My hubby shoveled the snow away from the front of the shed and they tippy toed out and looked around and went back in! The Cashmere's are somewhat braver about being out, but they don't like to be rained or snowed on either. We've had pretty good weather here, although we've had a cold snap lately. But, I don't really worry about the weather...they have shelter and warm bedding. They won't be kidding till mid-March, hopefully it will be good weather then. But, my husband helped me finish the new stalls in the barn so everyone can get inside when "their time comes", and of course, being in the barn will be somewhat more comfortable for me! LOL
     
  15. KikoFaerie

    KikoFaerie New Member

    162
    Jan 21, 2008
    So. Central Kansas
    I, too, know nothing about fiber goats nor do I have any but am very fascinated by them and will be watching this thread. Keep learnin' us up, ladies! ;-)
     
  16. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    It's been in the double-digit below zero for air temp (wind chill puts it into the -35 or worse category) for almost a week straight around here - for the 2nd time this winter, and my pygoras seem to be doing just fine. I keep the pen door shut during severe subzero wind chill days, which means they are bored as heck.

    They are premaddonas though. Wont step in the snow for nothing, till I put the XMas tree out there, then they couldn't help themselves. Dolly, my white doe, ran through the snow to get to the tree, took a few bites of it then started screaming. Had to go carry her back into the barn. She was just fine and dandy once her little hooves were out of the snow.

    Go figure. High maintenance lady - that's for sure :)
     
  17. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    That is funny. I wonder WHO spoiled them in the first place?????
     
  18. MissMM

    MissMM New Member

    645
    Oct 22, 2007
    McGregor, MN
    Me, me and me. And I've had an absolute blast spoiling them. They are all lap goats for sure. We'll see how well that works when they're full grown :).