LGD transplant question (she's home)

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by Perfect7, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    We recently bought our nubian, and the breeder is selling Great Pyrenees females, adult. I watched the dogs, who were some distance from the herd when we arrived but when I stepped in with the goats the dogs were both there in a flash. They were friendly but watched every move I made with the goats, and one stayed glued to my side. She was nice, but cautious. I was very impressed.
    So, we are thinking of returning to the breeder and buying one of these girls. My question is, how well do adult LGD's move from one herd to another? She would be familiar with the nubian we just bought, but the eight boer does would be all new to her.
    I haven't seen any predators around here, with the exception of the neighbor's dogs that border the back pasture, but our girls will eventually have access to the back pasture and I can't see a lot of it from the house. So, a LGD makes sense and I like the idea of an adult with experience instead of a puppy. The breeder said this LGD also helps deliver the kids (how cute!).
    Anybody transplanted an adult LGD into a herd with good results?
     
  2. CrossCreekTX

    CrossCreekTX New Member

    356
    Aug 10, 2009
    Central East Texas
    Re: LGD transplant question

    Yes, I have and she did fine.

    One of my Pyrs "attended" my last goat (FF) this season. I didn't even know she was in labor, despite thinking I was keeping an eye on her. Checked on her, seemed fine, about an hour later went out to feed the pig and she had a dry, fluffy doeling nursing. Pyr was over in the corner asleep when I got out there.
     

  3. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Re: LGD transplant question

    As long as you build (or have) an escape proof pen in the middle or bordering your goat area she will be fine. I'd keep her in there until she gets used to her surroundings... her new charges and you. Take her for walks on a leash everyday around the perimeter of where you want her to be guarding.... introduce her personally to each of YOUR animals... that way she learns exactly who belongs and who does not. LGD's are order nerds... they must know where everyone is and who everyone is at all times! :slapfloor: What a great oppurtunity to get an already trained adult!!!! :wahoo: Just make sure to ask what her flaws are so that you can be prepared in advance.
     
  4. CrossCreekTX

    CrossCreekTX New Member

    356
    Aug 10, 2009
    Central East Texas
    Re: LGD transplant question

    One of my Pyrs likes to bring me animals. Neighbor's goats and pony were rounded up, put in my pasture and not allowed to leave.
     
  5. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    Re: LGD transplant question

    :ROFL:

    My neighbors who do rescue horses/ponies will sure love that! The only place I can put her besides in the pasture with the goats is in my backyard with the other big dogs (rottie, great dane, and old english mastiff). That's probably not a good option. Will have to figure something out as far as that goes. I will ask about her faults and her age (something else I don't know). Just glad it's a possibility! I really don't like the puppy stages at all.
     
  6. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    Re: LGD transplant question

    She is 11 months old, registered. She's huge, so I expected her to be at least two or three. Has never escaped the pasture, helps clean off the new babies, keeps strangers and strange animals out. Fault: May be aggressive with small dogs. Hasn't attacked any but has growled and run them off (I have a small dog that likes to go out with the goats). Of course, that's also part of her job, so not sure if I can count that as a fault. She was born/raised with goats and mom/dad were a working pair with goats. She comes home Saturday. :leap:
    If she comes into heat, wont that attract all the male dogs around and kind of defeat our purpose? Just an oddball question and wondering if we shouldn't get her spayed. Of course, would be nice to keep one of her puppies later for a working pair.
     
  7. DPW

    DPW New Member

    92
    Mar 13, 2010
    Crow, Oregon.
    Re: LGD transplant question

    Not being spayed you should expect her to be distracted when she goes into heat. Her guarding responsibilities may take a back seat to finding a mate. Not etched in concrete as every dog is different but it is a distinct possibility.
    Domestic dogs kill more goats in this country than any other predator.
    Pyr's are one of the oldest and most intelligent breeds of dog there is. They are also very independant. They will do everything you ask them to do. As long as they feel like it. Their hearing can be very selective.
    I would encourage you to get her. Being owned by a Great Pyrenees has been a wonderful experience for us. I highly recommend it.
     
  8. cmjust0

    cmjust0 New Member

    237
    Oct 8, 2009
    Re: LGD transplant question

    The first LGD we brought in was 7mos old and probably around 100lbs when he came here. Totally unsocialized, and very people-aggressive.. He was given to us simply because we had time to work with him and were willing to give him a shot.

    He and the herd queen had it out on DAY ONE. It ended with her raring up to butt him and him leaping into the air and grabbing her by the ear.. She FREAKED, jerked her head back, and ran away.. When we investigated the damage, we found spit...that was all. Not a drop of blood -- just SPIT.

    LGDs know what they're doing, usually... Even if they don't really get on with the goats right away, they're most likely not going to hurt any of them.

    The dog in question here is a Sarplaninac.. They're simply known to be more aggressive than Pyrs anyway..

    When we brought home a 5.5mo old Sarplaninac/Pyr (25%/75%, respectively) cross, she was kinda lost until she saw goats walk out of the barn. I've never seen a dog so happy in my life as she was to see goats.

    Of course, they immediately broke her heart when she proceeded to run directly at them (to say HI!) at full steam.. They weren't used to that, so they bolted and she stood there kinda... :( ...they got used to ber being very "paws on" in short order, though, and now the kids curl up with her pretty frequently. She'll be 9mo here in a few weeks.

    All in all, though, I don't think you'll have a problem.. :)

    If you were introducing an adult "LGD-breed" dog with no actual livestock experience to goats as an adult, that might be a different story.
     
  9. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    I got off work early today so we got to bring our LGD home a day early! The owner hadn't transferred the paperwork into her name from the breeder, so we got to name her "Tuteur De La Chevre" (Guardian of the Goat) in French. Let Miss Tuteur sniff the area then go out to meet everybody on a leash. What a welcoming comittee! She had a herd of snorting, stomping, angry girls. Even the nubian who lived with her didn't seem to recognize her and joined in with the snorting! Tuteur didn't make a sound, just sat there looking a bit terrified. Finally the herd queen broke the ranks, where she had been in the back protecting her new baby, and came forward to check it out. Suddenly she lowered her horns, met Tuteur in the head, and drove our poor dog's head into the ground. She's okay, but she's now inside in my bathroom for the night. Tomorrow, we shall try again. However, as upset as I would have been about that headbutt, Tuteur barked ferociously at the horses as they charged up near the goats (seperate fencing but close by). Poor girl.
    Maybe the goats can protect Tuteur once they all get attached and bonded? :laugh: She's never been with the horned variety before. And here I was afraid she may be a little too rough with the week-old doeling.
     
  10. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    oh no don't put her in your bathroom... do you have a pen for her?? She needs to be somewhere in a pen near the feeder so the goats can get used to her scent and learn that she is not going to hurt them. (yet where she is safe from them) If she can't be near them they won't ever bond.
     
  11. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    I only have the buck pen (two goats), the isolation pen (currently occupied with two goats), the chicken coop, and the backyard with the other dogs. Since it's dark and she doesn't know the perimeter yet, I was just going to keep her in one night and then tomorrow she and I would spend all day out with the goats together when everybody can see and we can walk the pasture perimeter together. My neighbors also have a large dog kennel I can borrow tomorrow morning to set up out there for her. I know the bathroom isn't ideal at all, but it's just for tonight. :shrug:
    My big dogs all live outside and she wont become the exception.
     
  12. CrossCreekTX

    CrossCreekTX New Member

    356
    Aug 10, 2009
    Central East Texas
    Be careful of kenneling a Pyr. Many do not do at all well in a confined space.
    My goats head butt the dogs all the time. The dogs just stand there till the goat settles down and get on with whatever they were doing. Even the goats with horns don't seem to bother the dogs.
     
  13. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    Dh went down to the neighbors house and they use their kennel for their shepherd during the day. But, we took the advice on here and Tuteur is in the buck pen right next to where the does come in to eat in the morning. It's about 100 feet x 100 feet with our 4 month old buckling and 5 month old wether. They are non-dog aggressive and she's doing great with them. She cowered away from them, showed no interest, and is pretty much keeping her distance. In the morning we will go back out with the girls. 2 1/2 acres is enough room for her to get away from them. :thumb: Thank you. I need to remember she isn't a "normal dog" for me to pamper like a pet dog I brought home.
     
  14. CrossCreekTX

    CrossCreekTX New Member

    356
    Aug 10, 2009
    Central East Texas
    Sounds like a plan to me! She will be friendly enough without pampering. Pyrs like people.
     
  15. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    These dogs are just awesome! The goats are more tolerant today and she can get within twenty feet before somebody snorts (while still chewing cud and laying down). She acts aloof with the goats like she's ignoring them, but when the horses came up to drink (which always sets off the backyard dogs to barking for fun), she was up and moved between the herd and the barking sounds. I've also noticed that about once every 30 minutes she will actually circle the entire perimeter of the pasture. WOW! Did somebody teach her that, or do they just do that naturally?
    She seems very content now to be out with the girls. :love:
     
  16. logansmommy7

    logansmommy7 New Member

    925
    Nov 11, 2009
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Do you have chickens? I'm thinking of getting a year old Maremma/GP from a lady who is local. The dog is already with goats and does her job well-but has never been around chickens. Trying to figure out how I might work her into that. From what I've learned so far about this particular dog is that she is all LGD-she is very serious about her job...but I don't want to get her and then have her eat my chickens!
     
  17. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    Yes, I do have chickens but they aren't free range. They are in "Fort Knox"! :p They have a 20x30 run with a big shed. The 5 foot fence is lined on the inside with chicken wire and the outside with welded wire, 1x6 boards along the top and bottom, and a run of electrical fencing along the bottom. It's also seperated by three feet from my back yard where my humungo dogs keep anything away that might be tempted.
    I did try to walk Tuteur in there last night with the chickens, but she tucked her tail and turned back to the gate. She didn't want any part of them. I don't think she would try to kill them, but I don't think she'd protect them either unless we worked on it. She doesn't seem to mind the "cow ducks" that fly into the pasture with the goats to eat their poo (free worm control!)
    **Edited to say the previous owner had chickens as well, and I think hers were free range. So, she may have been taught to leave them alone.
     
  18. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    Perfect7,

    Just got the pm. Did you check out the two at the vet? We wouldn't be able to get there anytime soon I'm afraid. :sigh: Are you getting one of them? I clipped Grumpy and gave him a bath Saturday plus frontline. He did very well. Still has not wagged his tail but he lets me pet him and he listens when I talk to him. He still looks so sad. ( granted, the hair cut looks bad but he should be cooler)We are going to put up some chicken wire so he can't get through the fence anywhere and turn him out with them. Cross your fingers and I'll cross mine for you. :laugh:

    Gina
     
  19. Perfect7

    Perfect7 New Member

    Apr 19, 2010
    South Georgia
    Crossing my fingers for Grumpy! The lady who found the two Great Pyrenees puppies has already taken them to the local animal shelter and they have been closed for the holiday, opening tomorrow. I'm going to go look at them in the morning and see if we could do a "trial run" to see how they do with goats. Since they were abandoned at a farm, there's no telling how well they would even do with livestock. Things sure would have been simpler had they not already gone to the pound! They are also both female, so not sure how well Tuteur would accept another girl around. :shrug:
    Tuteur's doing great, though! Tonight she even herded everyone into the shelter when it began to rain. :thumbup: She's awesome. Everything they say about them seems to be true. Here she is!
     

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  20. mrs. lam

    mrs. lam New Member

    Apr 20, 2010
    She looks very happy. :thumbup:

    I have an update of my own....Grumpy is out with the goats. (drum roll) He's HAPPY! Tail up walking the fence even...are you ready for this....playing with his toys! He was in the goat yard this morning when I called him for breakfast. (he eats on the back deck) He put his head up ears perked and came right up. First time he's done that. Looks like all he needed was some goats to make him happy, just like his owner. :laugh:

    Gina