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Hi all,

I'm sure that like most goat owners, I would love if my favorite goats would live forever, lol. Assuming that they do not have any medical issues, what is the typical life expectancy for goats? Does it vary between breed and gender?

I have heard 12-15 years is a good average life expectancy for dwarf breeds. In your experience, does this hold true?
 

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@Orcakat from this group there are owners who have goats that are as old as or older than 11 years. I am not sure what breeds they were. But if an animal, any animal has a perfect life they can live extensively. Maybe a few more knowledgeable people will be able to advise.... It will be interesting to see
 

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Hi all,

I'm sure that like most goat owners, I would love if my favorite goats would live forever, lol. Assuming that they do not have any medical issues, what is the typical life expectancy for goats? Does it vary between breed and gender?

I have heard 12-15 years is a good average life expectancy for dwarf breeds. In your experience, does this hold true?
Well I have the Nigerian dwarf breed and have also heard that but I only have had my goats for 1-2 years and they are only a little over a year or younger so can’t help you with that..
 

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I had an old Pygmy buck from the Zoo that lived to 17 years, if the zoo paperwork was correct.
I currently have one doe who will be 13 this year. She faithfully pops out one buck kid each spring, always the biggest, fattest baby here, she was mooching up to the buck yesterday. I have kept her all these years waiting on just one doe kid because she's a mean little stinker who bites people but is the easiest keeper, almost worm-free, good-footed & healthiest goat ever. So I want her genes in the herd.
I have 2 eight year olds still healthy & shiny, they are co-herd queens.
Barring accidents, mine usually pass between 12 and 15.
But I have to say, despite years of goat-proofing, my #1 cause of death here is still death by misadventure, no matter the age.:oops:
 

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What I’ve heard (tho I have no goats that old yet) bucks tend to live shorter lives than does (do to the stress of going into rut). While does live longer (and wethers) I also depends on the stress they experience in there lives, and their care obviously.

 

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What I’ve heard (tho I have no goats that old yet) bucks tend to live shorter lives than does (do to the stress of going into rut). While does live longer (and wethers) I also depends on the stress they experience in there lives, and their care obviously.


I was reading your article and is says this about Oberhasli's: "We might say those oberhasli goats are the breed which asks more special attention. Make sure they have a proper space living and medical treatment, such as vaccinations. Oberhasli goats are prone to tetanus infection which a serious issue for them. Compared to the pygmy breed, oberhasli is smaller and cuter. That is why this goat is susceptible to diseases."
I thought that was strange. I haven't ever dealt with that breed but I thought they were standard sized goats? Are they smaller than pygmies?
 

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I had an old Pygmy buck from the Zoo that lived to 17 years, if the zoo paperwork was correct.
I currently have one doe who will be 13 this year. She faithfully pops out one buck kid each spring, always the biggest, fattest baby here, she was mooching up to the buck yesterday. I have kept her all these years waiting on just one doe kid because she's a mean little stinker who bites people but is the easiest keeper, almost worm-free, good-footed & healthiest goat ever. So I want her genes in the herd.
I have 2 eight year olds still healthy & shiny, they are co-herd queens.
Barring accidents, mine usually pass between 12 and 15.
But I have to say, despite years of goat-proofing, my #1 cause of death here is still death by misadventure, no matter the age.:oops:
Maybe that doe is telling you that you need to keep a buckling and continue her line that way. ;)
 

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@Orcakat I have been wondering the same things. My oldest goats are only 4ish, so I hopefully have a long time before I face the possibility of losing one.
I think, with any animal, the care, and understanding what they really need, makes a huge difference. When we raised rough collies, our original dogs only lived to a maximum age of 10. Since we changed some things in their management, we had one live to 12 and an half (and I think she would have lived longer, if she hadn't been hit by a car, resulting in ongoing health complications). And one will be 10 in January and still going strong.
 

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Average of a normal working goat fed properly 12 to 15 years. I had a Sàanen that lived until a few weeks before her 14th birthday. She had a tumor.
 

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Had boers at 15.

Really it depends on care throughout the years.

Proper feed, hoof care.

Keeping worms, cocci, external parasites at bay.

Making sure you don’t feed hard feed, keeping their teeth longer.
The longer they keep their teeth, the better they can maintain their bodyweight and thrive.
If they get too thin from no teeth, their years thereafter are numbered, as winter can get too hard on them and can go Sub temp or can get illness from a down immune system.
 

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My granny Aria, Shere Country SH Aria 1*M VEEE 90, will be 12 yrs old in the Spring. These pictures taken this last summer before she was Appraised as an 11 yr old VEEE 90 <3
 

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I agree with all the above advice. 🙂👍

What I’ve heard (tho I have no goats that old yet) bucks tend to live shorter lives than does (do to the stress of going into rut). While does live longer (and wethers) I also depends on the stress they experience in there lives, and their care obviously.

That's what I've heard too, makes sense as well.
I don’t know. I thought they are standard size too- I’ve never owned an Oberhasli either. (That isn’t my article, just one I found to help OP with life expectancy lol)
Yes, Oberhaslis are standard sized goats. I honestly think the person who wrote that article has no experience with goats. 😉😅
 

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Yes, Oberhaslis are standard sized goats. I honestly think the person who wrote that article has no experience with goats.
At first I just scanned over that article for the life expectancy, but reading it more that person definitely has no goat knowledge lol!
 

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I just now read the article to see what everyone was talking about and yep, that person has no first-hand knowledge of goats! I started laughing as soon as I read the description of the Boer goat:

Boer goats are the tough type. They have a high resistance to any disease. Surprisingly, they can also survive in extreme weather. Starts from the lowest degree until the highest degree according to the goats’ body ability. That is why people love to raise this type than any other. Besides their body resistance, farmers like to get their milk too.
How long do goats live according to this type? Boer goats usually live until their old age. Mostly their death caused by natural reasons. These goats live from eight to twelve years as the bucks, while the females tend to reach twelve to twenty years. It is good for you if you choose Boer goat. They don’t need a special requirement. Just let them free on the grass, that’s what makes the happy most.


Yeah. Goats clearly aren't the author's area of expertise and I don't believe English is their first language. In my experience, Boers are shorter-lived and experience more overall health problems than most dairy breeds. The rest of the breeds have descriptions that are just as wacky!
 
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