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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently searching for a boer blood line for meat goats not show goats. I've noticed that boer bloodlines have Lost there way, seems everyone went to breeding for show any suggestions
 

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Well, our main goal is meat. Only if I think it is showable does he/she get papers.
Showing is fun & a mini vacation for me even though we don't usually do real well.
Come take a look see someday!
 

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I'm currently searching for a boer blood line for meat goats not show goats. I've noticed that boer bloodlines have Lost there way, seems everyone went to breeding for show any suggestions
I would suggest you reconsider your current opinion. ABGA Boer show goats are actually evaluated by real livestock judges who are certified through a rigorous training and evaluation. If you have ever met one of these judges, you would know they are not flakey wanna bees, but farmers and ranchers who have years of experience with the Boer breed. Inherently, the goats they select at a show they are judging would be the goats they would most like to put into their own herd if they could. Their selection criteria is up on the ABGA website for all to read. You will notice the standards are for a breed of goats bred for meat. Simply put, I'm saying the best Boer bloodlines for "meat" are the same as those for "show". The difference IMO is that those condemning the show goats have never had their goats subjectively evaluated by anyone. You are taking their word for it.
 

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Show goats are meat goats, just fancier, when conditioned. ;) Most are easy keepers and have meat on their bones for more meat per lb.
You feed them differently of course, if you want to raise them for meat, you want less fat on them, but carcass weight, will be better, if fed properly.

You don't have to show them to own them.

Bloodlines really don't make the goat, it is the way they are bred and matched up.
if you want that and want more meat.

Breeding a narrow chested, narrow hipped, no big bone structured boer, to another similar goat, you won't have the good weight yield, when ready to butcher, as you would one that is big framed, wider and bigger boned. The most important one in your herd is your buck, he has a lot of influence. If you want to start there and then work up to bigger framed Does, it is a start. It is worth paying a bit more for the buck to better your herd, with what you already have. Get what you can afford of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I would suggest you reconsider your current opinion. ABGA Boer show goats are actually evaluated by real livestock judges who are certified through a rigorous training and evaluation. If you have ever met one of these judges, you would know they are not flakey wanna bees, but farmers and ranchers who have years of experience with the Boer breed. Inherently, the goats they select at a show they are judging would be the goats they would most like to put into their own herd if they could. Their selection criteria is up on the ABGA website for all to read. You will notice the standards are for a breed of goats bred for meat. Simply put, I'm saying the best Boer bloodlines for "meat" are the same as those for "show". The difference IMO is that those condemning the show goats have never had their goats subjectively evaluated by anyone. You are taking their word for
 

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Show goats are meat goats, just fancier, when conditioned. ;) Most are easy keepers and have meat on their bones for more meat per lb.
You feed them differently of course, if you want to raise them for meat, you want less fat on them, but carcass weight, will be better, if fed properly.
You don't have to show them to own them. Bloodlines really don't make the goat, it is the way they are bred and matched up.
if you want that and want more meat..
I agree you don't have to show your goats for them to be good goats. That's silly. But what I see happen is people accusing the goats that show breeders have as somehow *not* being good goats. OR good "meat" goats. That's even sillier and is border line lying. For the most part, ABGA judges have no idea what the "bloodline" of a goat in the ring is. They are judging the goat.

Are the goats in the ring arguably too fat? Yes, but that doesn't make them a bad goat either. You shouldn't confuse "management" with "genetics". Like Pam said, Boer goats should be easy keepers, period.

Just as "ennoblements" on a goat's papers don't make an individual goat a good goat, they sure as heck don't make them a *bad* goat. ABGA registration and the ennoblement designation are tools to evaluate bloodlines. ABGA shows are tools to have your goats evaluated. People who routinely use these tools often have very good goats.
 

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I read your reply that is now edited, Silver Star.
I'm sorry you feel that way, but you asked for good bloodlines for boer meat goats. If you are working off the assumption that bloodlines that are successful in the show ring are not good bloodlines for meat goats, you have wiped out the vast majority of good bloodlines period. For meat.

If you are wanting to find a breeder that has reasonably priced, hardy, good mothering, type Boer does for sale, then you should say so.

Hopefully Pam Toth won't mind me using her as an example... Pam has awesome goats. All you have to do is look at the pictures of them. I don't think Pam shows that much, but her goats are registered. If you look at the pedigrees of Pam's goats, you will see many of the very same foundation goats that are found in pedigrees of the successful show goats. Good is good. Bad is bad. It has nothing to do with the papers. Show Boers are meat goats.
 

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I agree with everything Tenacross has said.

Boers are a meat goat regardless of whether they are shown or not. They're are different styles of boers just like they're are different style and types within any breed of animal from any species.

If you want just meat animals and do not worry about show or registry I would suggest looking at individuals rather than lines. Either way you look at you want the same traits in a show goat and a commercial doe. Judge them as individuals in this order- structural correctness, volume and capacity (spring to ribs, bone, hip size ect), muscle and then femininity and masculinity (or style and balance over all)
 

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I don't know what Silver Star said before, that was edited and don't need to know, but, I don't mean to hurt anyone's feelings at all.
This is just truth and what good, meat goats represent. As in cattle, you want a good weight and carcass size, when butchered, to achieve more good cuts and meat itself, in lbs.

That OK Tenacross, to use me and my goaties as an example, thank you for the compliments. :)
I have shown in the past, however, I am just not wanting to subject my goats to diseases, that may be out there. I try really hard to keep a clean herd.

Registration papers don't make the goat, I have seen some with super genetics, but don't look good at all.
When you buy, look at the goat overall and how it can perfect the meat quantity for your herd. Cause you cannot judge by genetics alone.
All my goats are registered FB, I have the option to sell them as registered or not. The ones that don't make the cut are sold for meat, but have the meat on their bones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I read your reply that is now edited, Silver Star.
I'm sorry you feel that way, but you asked for good bloodlines for boer meat goats. If you are working off the assumption that bloodlines that are successful in the show ring are not good bloodlines for meat goats, you have wiped out the vast majority of good bloodlines period. For meat.

If you are wanting to find a breeder that has reasonably priced, hardy, good mothering, type Boer does for sale, then you should say so.

Hopefully Pam Toth won't mind me using her as an example... Pam has awesome goats. All you have to do is look at the pictures of them. I don't think Pam shows that much, but her goats are registered. If you look at the pedigrees of Pam's goats, you will see many of the very same foundation goats that are found in pedigrees of the successful show goats. Good is good. Bad is bad. It has nothing to do with the papers. Show Boers are meat goats.
So basically ur saying a grand champion goat is the best goat I can buy for meat?
 

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Managment has a lot to do with it. For youur lines, yes a winning or high placing goat might be the best. But really look at each animal and then choose. Most of the time people don't sell their best goats. Also depends on what your doing with them... breeding or just buying to slaughter
 

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I am not a meat breeder at this time. I do know exactly how I would start out though, partly through research and partly through reading these meat goat threads.

First I would work out with Tenacross to buy the very best buckling I could afford. I've seen his goats, I've seen the bloodlines he AI's with and I know that he runs disease free animals. I would raise that buck as well as I could and try to get him enobled. Not because that makes better meat but, because it raises the demand and prices on his kids.
I would also go to one of two of the other WA breeders and get 2 registered does. These also would be shown. Their kids would hopefully be sold for FFA projects.
The rest of my does would come from a gentleman I know here in OR that raises a wonderful herd of disease free Boer/Kikos. These would be my commercial does.

They are not saying that a GC is the best goat for meat...They are saying a GC quality is the best goat to breed for meat and perhaps make a little more selling for youth shows.
 

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So basically ur saying a grand champion goat is the best goat I can buy for meat?
I'm saying if you are looking at Boer bloodlines, you shouldn't consider successful show goats as inferior. But to your new question, if you were looking for a buck to buy, yes, a buck that was grand champion at competitive ABGA show would likely be a good buck to buy to sire meat goats. He would have been evaluated by an expert against many other nice bucks. If I was buying him, I would also want to know what his and his mother's teat structure is. If price of the grand champion was way more money than you wanted to spend, then you might consider a son of his. If I was only raising commercial goats, I would be more likely to try and buy (hypothetical) the buck kid that got 3rd - 7th in the GC's class of 20 bucks. Actually, an ABGA show is a great place to buy a reasonably priced, yet reasonably awesome, buck. Come see me. I'll sell you one. :)
 

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I had to crank my neck. Can you post this better? edit; Never mind.
I see some awesome names on there.
2dOX TnP is no longer alive. There might be semen around somewhere.
What do you want to improve on?
 

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Good lines.

For selling meat, I feel differently about having to have an ennobled or show goat, in order to sell the meat.
Get one with substance, he does not have to have to be perfect in every aspect to breed for meat. Meat sells per lb or on the hoof. It isn't worth any more than what going price is, for that week in ones area.
We are talking about goats bred for meat here, not wanting an exquisite specimen, he can have a few flaws, but not major.
Look at the goat, you will know, whether or not he has substance and that is what you want. Also shop for something in your price range and what will improve your herd from that moment to give more meat per say.
Remember, pedigree and the goat may not match, in other words, he or she may have tremendously good bloodlines but, the goat itself, isn't much to look at or have good meat ability.
Hope I am on the right track in what you are seeking and helped some. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yea it helps a lot it's a hard subject to explain what looking for so sorry for that. In my community there all old dairy farmer's thanks everybody
 

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Shows don't take into account mothering ability, parasite resistance, or the ability to thrive on forage. These are very important qualities in raising meat goats, and they have nothing to do with winning shows.
 
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